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21

It is easier to say 'Thy sins be forgiven thee'. The audience will not see anything happen. Anyone can say to anyone else, 'Thy sins be forgiven' and nobody will be any the wiser - until the Day of Judgement when it will be demonstrated (and that for all eternity) whether or not eternal punishment has been avoided. So for Jesus to say 'Thy sins be forgiven ...


17

This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. The NA28 includes the text similar to the GNT you quote: . . . τοῦτο τὸ γένος ἐν οὐδενὶ δύναται ἐξελθεῖν εἰ μὴ ἐν προσευχῇ (NA28) . . . this kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer (ESV) The apparatus notes the variant you ask about (the addition ...


15

A Plausible Majority Text Argument Susan's answer has correctly given the direct answer to your question when she states: This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. That is the simple fact. Which manuscript tradition the particular translation in question is following determines the omission or ...


11

Another addendum to Susan's fine answer and ScottS's alternative account. All manuscripts are not the same, which is why the text critic's job is not simply that of counting noses. We have two possible scenarios an original shorter reading, which was subsequently expanded in transmission by the addition of "+ and fasting" after "prayer"; an original ...


11

It depends on what one sees as the point of fulfilling the Old Testament prophecies. If you mean "is the only reason to ride a donkey because it matches the prophecy" as being a formulaic fulfillment then perhaps one has to expand the understanding of why the prophecy exists. The prophecy doesn't just identify the mode of transport, it also says something. ...


10

To me there is a far simpler and more likely explanation than errors or scribal slips. Especially considering cases like Matthew 27:61, which is surely no slip of the pen: Μαριὰμ ἡ Μαγδαληνὴ and the other Μαρία were sitting there opposite the tomb. Note that the author uses the phrase "and the other...", confirming that as far as they were concerned ...


9

The Jewish leaders wanted to arrest and kill Jesus quietly because they were afraid of how the people might react. Matthew 26:3-5 says, Then the chief priests and the elders of the people were gathered together in the court of the high priest, named Caiaphas; and they plotted together to seize Jesus by stealth and kill Him. But they were saying, 'Not ...


9

Mark is more reliable.¹ Even if you were to completely discredit Mark², something is more than nothing. You cannot reasonably compare the accuracy of one document that exists with one that is only speculated to exist. Anybody that tries to tell you differently is selling something³. Answering your stated question is really that simple. In the world of ...


9

Short Answer: "Two swords will be sufficient" fits the semantics, but has significant contextual difficulties. "Enough!" fits the broader context better, but has other significant difficulties. The best explanation seems to be that Jesus was not thrilled with their interpretation of His instructions, but this wasn't clear to them until after the fact, and ...


9

There would be no reason to doubt the veracity of the bible on the subject of the story of Barabbas and the custom of releasing a prison from prison at the time of the Passover. There is in fact evidence of the custom in the Mishnah. See snips of article below. Citation: Chavel, Charles B. “The Releasing of a Prisoner on the Eve of Passover in Ancient ...


8

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary ...


8

Short Answer The answer has everything to do with Psalms 2 and Jesus' claim to be king. Judas chose to sarcastically betray Jesus, the "supposed Son of God”, with a kiss. His kiss is deeply ironic. As with the soldiers in the crucifixion, He mocks Jesus in his claim to be the rightful king of Israel. Long Answer When Jesus entered Jerusalem on a donkey, ...


8

It seems that most of the commentaries take "at home" to mean Peter's home from Mark 1:29, which seems to have functioned as the base for Jesus' ministry in Capernaum. While both follow this majority opinion, J. Marcus allows that "en oikō̧" could simply mean "in a house" and R. Stein states the possibility that it is Jesus' own home. However, given that the ...


8

The precise meaning of the phrases ‘Son of Man’ and ‘Son of God’ in the Gospels has been a matter of scholarly debate for two millennia. While it was once widely believed that both had strong messianic intentions, this view has been strongly challenged in the last century following analysis of the wider range of literature now available from the period (e.g....


8

Your question already contains an answer that Jesus could not not know that what He asked. Similarly, when Father asked Adam: "Adam, where are you" (Gen 3:9), He of course knew with the Son and the Holy Ghost together, where Adam was; and When Jesus asked "who has touched me, for a power has came out of me?"(Luke 8:46), of course He knew who has touched Him; ...


7

Here's your irony: "Malchus" is the Greek version of the man's Hebrew name "Melek" (http://biblehub.com/topical/m/malchus.htm). This word actually means "counselor" and "king"! Peter judged these men for failing to acknowledge Jesus as King, but in the process, attacked the man whose name was "king". Didn't Jesus say "what you do to the least of these, you ...


7

About Time Does not need to be "the same" time, and is not the same time Notice that the Mk 15:25 (3rd hour) is stated as "when they crucified him." In the Jn 19:14 passage (6th hour) the reference is to when Pilate sat in his place of judgement for the final condemnation of Christ to the cross. There are time differences The easy way to state it is that ...


7

We can only take the literal meaning of the word of the word we find in the text. Wherever a word can have two meanings it should generally be read as normally used in the Greek language. The word used in both Matthew and Mark is ἀκρίς which translates as grasshopper.


6

The confusing passage here seems to be Matthew's account, which we will come to in due course. The other accounts, including the apocryphal Gospel of Peter give rather clear indications of timing, so we begin by examining them: When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus’...


6

I Personally Believe Peter Denied Christ Exactly Six Times I did a study of this exact problem in my seminary studies for my M.Div., and just looking at the textual details and collating the accounts came to the conclusion that the answer is best resolved as seeing it as two sets of denials of three each, with each group of the three occurring prior to a ...


6

I don’t know which religious denomination place the last words of Jesus in the order you present, but one Protestant source lists them but with the caveat that they are not in any particular order: Matthew 27:46 “Why have you forsaken me?” was spoken at about the ninth hour. Luke 23:34 “Father forgive them” was spoken during the period Jesus was being ...


6

The distinction between what the writer hears and his own added "interpretation" is usually documented as such. For example: Matt 1:23 - "Behold, the virgin will hold in womb, and will bring forth a son, and they will call His name Immanuel" which is, being translated, "God with us." Mark 5:41 - And having taken the hand of ...


5

Evangelion means simply "good news." The Greek comes from aggelion which simply means "message or news." (Note that two gammas together in Greek are pronounced as "ng.") The word in question has an "eu-" prefix which simple means "good." Thus, it is "good news." Always start with the simple meaning. If it is good news of a military victory, that will be ...


5

Before reconciling the synoptic account, generally, with John's account, it is first necessary to reconcile the different versions of the synoptic account. In Mark 1:16, Jesus sees Simon and Andrew his brother casting a net into the sea and calls them to follow him, and that he will make them fishers of men. Later, in verses 1:29-30, he visits the house of ...


5

Concerning the accuracy of the gospel The introduction to Luke's gospel is in "high" Greek, as was common in historical writing at the time. Moreover, the author claims to have researched events well. We know that the author had gained access to Mark, and claims to have utilized several additional sources until he got "perfect knowledge" of the events ...


5

There were two main qualifications, one is primarily cultural, and one is really universal. A host family (or person) would need to be hospitable. Abraham, Lot, and others throughout the Old Testament were "lovers of strangers" (to use an anachronistic expression derived from the Greek word for hospitality). In the ANE, hospitality and being a good ...


5

The passage in Luke 17 appears to be parallel to Matthew 24. If these passages are parallel, then the birds of prey refer to events evident in the heavens that point to judgment on earth. Like the lightning that flashes in the sky, these phenomena in the heavens "illuminate" the Day of the Lord when the spiritually dead are judged on earth. That is, birds of ...


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