7

In the online report of the lectures by Ken Dark to which OP's links refer, there is a comment thread from some very learned participants. I take the liberty of quoting extracts from two of the key participants. Richard Bauckham (11th June 2013): The urban site currently being excavated between modern Migdal and the coast is part of the same city as the ...


5

Yes, though ‘Jerusalem’ is not a Hebrew word we can properly parse because it’s a transliteration of an older Semitic word. As a city name Jerusalem predates the Hebrew language by at least a millennium; its first known appearance is in Egyptian execration texts in the 20th century BCE. According to Yisrael Shalem, the exact pronunciation of the hieroglyph ...


5

Short Answer No, the Bible does not teach that the earth is flat. Authorial Intent If we want to understand what the Bible teaches, we have to start by asking what the authors were trying to communicate to their original intended audiences. We can not start with our own questions and try to "see what the Bible says about it". This is something you learn ...


5

According to many Rabbis, Meroz is a planet from which heavenly beings inhabit like the JUDGES 5:20 REFERENCES: 5:20 From the sky the stars fought. From their courses, they fought against Sisera. 5:23 'Curse Meroz,' said the angel of Yahweh. 'Curse bitterly its inhabitants, because they didn't come to help Yahweh, to help Yahweh against the mighty.' Rabbi ...


5

There is, as Richard points out, a whole Wikipedia page dedicated to the subject which is far superior to my quick answer down here. Topheth is probably synonymous with the valley of Hinnom (Jer 7:32), which is exactly that valley south of Jerusalem where children was sacrificed to Moloech. So you are right when associating this with Gehenna/Hell. The ...


4

Image courtesy of Google Maps The image above shows a modern terrain view of Israel. The circular area represents the extent of the horizon1 from the top of Mount Nebo, where currently sits the Memorial Church of Moses.2 God sent Moses to the top of Mount Nebo (Deuteronomy 32:49, 34:1) to see for himself the wonder of הָאָ֣רֶץ הַטּוֹבָ֔ה אֲשֶׁ֖ר בְּעֵ֣בֶר ...


4

This is a famous debated question. There are two possibilities: One is that ἐν τῇ ἀνατολῇ means that the Magoi saw the star while they were still “in the East”. The other is that they observed the asterism at its heliacal rising, which would of necessity be “in the Eastern sky”.


4

Jesus was going from Judea to Galilee (John 4:3). To get from Judea in the south to Galilee in the north, Jesus had to pass through Samaria in the middle.


4

This cannot be answered with any certainty. Almost every Bible atlas and Bible commentator offers a different theory about the route of the Exodus. Here is what can be known: 1. The Hebrew name for this is "yam suph" = "sea of reeds". Note the differences in probable reference as from BDB for the word סוּף (suph) a. to Gulf of Suez ...


3

Rather than enter with the people, Moses is allowed to see the land: Go up to the top of Pisgah and lift up your eyes westward and northward and southward and eastward, and look at it with your eyes, for you shall not go over this Jordan. (Deuteronomy 3:27 ESV) When Moses looks west he will see Jericho and the first lands which the LORD delivers to the ...


3

Saadia Gaon does explain this verse geographically: The Book of Beliefs and Opinions 3:8 (p. 164-165) The first of these is the statement of the Torah, And he said: The Lord came from Sinai, and rose from Seir unto them; He shined forth from mount Paran, and He came from the myriads holy (Deut. 33:2). In reality, however, these three are all of ...


3

According to The New Ungers Bible Dictionary under the term GO'SHEN page 492 and 493 A northeastern section of the Egyptian Delta region usually called "the land of Goshen," "country of Goshen" (Gen. 45:10; Josh. 10:41), or simply "Goshen" (Gen. 47:27) and "the land of Rameses" (47:11; cf. Ex. 12:37). In this region ...


3

Probably not. They didn't believe A few verses earlier we are told of the group: And their words seemed to them as idle tales, and they believed them not. (Luke 24:11) Not the route you'd take to Galilee The most direct route to Galilee would be through Samaria, but many Jews avoided the Samaritans and didn't go this way (e.g. see John 4:9); the next best ...


2

The bronze mountains represent the entrance or gateway to the presence of God and in particular are reminsicent of the two great bronze pillars of Solomon's temple. Context of the Canon Mountains Mountains are used often as symbols throughout the Hebrew Bible. Their use is not uniform, but there are identifiable symbolic themes. Mountains may represent ...


2

Short Answer: It depends on which hermeneutic you follow. To my knowledge there are three major hermeneutical approaches to this question: Approach #1: The literal hermeneutic In this approach, the text means precisely what it says; Bethel refers to Bethel, Judah to Judah, Ephraim to Ephraim. If we read a prophecy anticipating the downfall of Gilgal it is ...


2

Using literal hermeneutics it is indeed a fool's errand as mentioned by curiousdannii. There is no reason to expect post flood geography to look anything like pre-flood geography. If instead you turn to the hermeneutics of sensus plenior (SP), then all the scriptures speak of Christ, and if we miss him, we miss the intention of the author; God. In SP, the ...


2

Well this is really a very complicated subject, and the question has more to do with archaeology and geography than it has with biblical hermeneutics, indeed for over a century scholars have been trying to determine the correct route of the Israelites in the wilderness and there is still much disagreement, but I will try to keep my answer as simple as I can. ...


2

It wasn't necessary in the directional sense (physical sense). It was necessary in the spiritual sense. He was led to go there to meet the woman at the well. A similar example to this is Philip goes and stands by the chariot, except in this case, the words are used "The Spirit said to Philip" (Acts 8:29). When we do things in the physical realm there are not ...


2

The river is the Euphrates, "the great river" (Deuteronomy 1:7). "Beyond the River" in Ezra-Nehemiah refers specifically to the province called by that name, which was southwest of the Euphrates and thus beyond the river from the point of the Persian rulers in Mesopotamia. In Joshua, "beyond the river" would mean the northeast side of Euphrates, Mesopotamia, ...


1

I'm not sure if this is quite the hermeneutical type of answer you are looking for, but the rabbinic interpreters used this verse as a source for the rabbinic legend that God first offered the Torah to the other nations before offering it to Israel (and each nation turned it down because of a specific commandment therein that they didn't like). They explain ...


1

Here is what Köstenberger put in his commentary: The reference to the physical setting of this event serves as a structural link indicating the end of the paragraph (cf. 6:59; 8:20; 11:54). It also helps transition to the climax of John’s testimony in the ensuing verses (Ridderbos 1997: 68). John takes care to distinguish this “Bethany beyond the Jordan” (...


1

Below is a map of the two possible sites and their proximity to a verified Roman road of the time: Khirbet Kana, some 6 or 7km north of the road. Kafr Kanna, about 1km south of the road. Map courtesy of www.jesus-story.net Here is Nathaniel's1 contribution to a discussion with Philip regarding Jesus' birthplace: And Nathanael said unto him, Can there ...


1

The Psalms very often contain couplets that mean the same thing: Then Israel came to Egypt; Jacob sojourned in the land of Ham. The second line is just a repetition of the same thing as the first line, but in poetic language (Israel and Jacob are the same person). It is not the actual name of the area. All the sons of Noah spread out and eventually settled ...


1

Many locations have been suggested, but this is really a fool's errand. Genesis 2:10 clearly says that one river splits into four. But we can't see that now, because the geography is very different. Whether you think it is historical or not, the story of Noah's Flood in Genesis is of one that destroys the earth: I establish my covenant with you that never ...


1

Karkor probably corresponds to Qarkar mentioned by Shalmaneser II, S. of Hamath (KB, I, 173). It has been said to mean, “soft, level ground.” It was far in the desert, beyond the usual range of the nomadic tribes. A more definite description cannot be given and the exact site has not been located. Some argue that the indefinite article 'the' should be ...


1

Most of the brothers were born in the same place - The house of Lavan in Haran, which was the father of Jacobs wives. For more details I advice to to visit the excellent new site which is partly in English too: http://hatanakh.com/en/tanach/0.31.1


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