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18

This passage is absolutely critical in reading the old testament. It's right up there with the tree of knowledge, as it records the founding of Babylon, one of the two evil empires (along with Egypt). A good chunk of the bible has to do with struggles against or prophecies directed against Babylon, so its founding story is a big deal. Here is the text (LEB) ...


14

Succinctly stated, as Christ himself was circumcised,1 all those who are “in Christ” are also circumcised with Christ,2 just as all those who are in Christ: suffer with Christ3 are crucified with Christ4 die with Christ5 are buried with Christ6 are resurrected with Christ7 are made alive with Christ8 live with Christ9 are glorified with Christ10 inherit ...


13

The Hebrew word תֵּבָה (tebah) occurs 28 times in the OT and simply means (literally), chest, box, coffin, etc. That is, a box-like container used to house and protect some contents that are (by definition) precious. See BDB meaning in appendix below. Interestingly, the noun is only ever used to describe just two objects: Noah's ark - the great ship, 26 ...


12

Hmm I am not so sure about the question not referring to Adam...if one reads Genesis 3.22... And the LORD God said, "The man has now become like one of us, knowing good and evil. He must not be allowed to reach out his hand and take also from the tree of life and eat, and live forever." "The man" in chapter 3 vs 22 is clearly Adam. I ...


10

According to Genesis 27:39-40, Isaac did extend to Esau the following blessing. Behold, your dwelling shall be of the fatness of the earth, and of the dew of heaven from above. By your sword you shall live, and you shall serve your brother; And it shall come to pass, when you become restless, that you shall break his yoke from your neck. The ...


10

Simply put, the law of circumcision was given by God to the Hebrew people who made up the physical, geographical nation of Israel and to all the foreigners who would live in the nation of Israel. Jesus came fulfill the law and the prophets, and to be the atoning sacrifice for sin once and for all for all who trust in him, so thanks to Jesus, our right ...


10

Two different nakednesses are in view here. The fig leaves covered his physical nakedness but did nothing to quench his awareness that his newly defiled conscience was naked before God. The sequence bears this out: Their eyes were opened and they knew they were naked, they made fig leaf coverings for their nakedness, they heard God coming and hid because ...


9

Just focusing on your question, "What does John mean by 'The Word was God?'” John is making the most categorical and concise statement found anywhere in scripture regarding the deity of Jesus - He is GOD. If you need a more detailed explanation on this I would recommend you read the the answers posted on the following thread. "Why John 1:1 in (DRB)(Douay-...


8

”When did God speak these waters into being?” The answer is given in the Hebrew text בראשׁית ברא אלהים את השׁמים ואת הארץ The fact is that God ברא (created) the השׁמים (heavens - plural) in (the) בראשׁית and so that’s when the waters were made when the heavens were made. In Biblical cosmology the heavens were made of water hence המים (waters - also plural) ...


8

The verbs וּשְׁמָרַנִי (ushmarani) and וְנָתַן (venatan) have the appearance of verbs conjugated in the perfect aspect and would therefore be translated into English in the past tense, i.e., “and he protected me” and “he gave me,” respectively. The reason I say “they have the appearance” is because a verb conjugated in the perfect aspect, and a vav-...


7

The question is predicated on the implicit assumption that Gen 42:8-16 is a complete record of the conversation between Joseph and the 10 brothers. The above assumption is clearly untrue for two reasons: As evidenced by the record in Gen 43:7, 27, and The very common Bible practice of providing a shortened summary of events for the sake of brevity, ...


7

The understanding for the sign of circumcision is deeply embedded in the OT concept of covenants. All divinely initiated covenants in the Bible contain the following six elements: Statement of pre-amble and/or purpose of the covenant Promise of benefits given by God. This shows that such divine covenants are the initiative of God alone. In no case were ...


7

Did you pay attention to the masora? 3:12 has הִ֛וא, pronounced he meaning she, while 3:15 and 3:20 have ה֚וּא, pronounced hu meaning he. See the following: https://biblehub.com/hebrew/1931.htm What does "Qr perpetuum" mean? What is the meaning and function of הַהִוא֒ in Exodus 3:8? Note: the LXX translates הוא as αὕτη in 3:12. This significantly ...


7

There is little doubt that the author of the Gospel of John alluded to Gen 1:1 when he started his gospel with the same Greek words as the Septuagint Greek translation of Gen 1:1: ἐν ἀρχῇ . But mere allusion does not exhaust ALL meaning of "In the beginning" as the rest of this answer will attempt to show how time does not seem to be the only ...


7

Eight times, God utters 'Let there be' or 'be there ...', expressing no more than a statement that something should exist. 'Be there light', and so on. Genesis 1:3 (light), 1:6 (firmament/divide waters), 1:9 (waters gather/dry), 1:11 (earth bring forth), 1:14 (luminaries), 1:20 (creatures out of water), 1:24 (creatures out of earth), 1:26 (man). (Notice that ...


6

The answer is quoted (Genesis 17:13) in the question. Your bodies will bear the mark of my everlasting covenant. If the covenant is everlasting, how can a human body, subject to death and decay, display that covenant . . . everlastingly ? It cannot. But the sign can be borne, during this life. And that is what circumcision is - but a signification of that ...


6

There is a lot more going on here than is implied in the OP's question. But first a simple principle of divine providence and grace. PRINCIPLE In John 11, when Jesus raised Lazarus (one of the greatest and most spectacular evidences of divine power!!), Jesus asked that men roll the stone away from the grave. Jesus could have done this by the same power ...


6

Adam said, "...I was naked" - past tense. So I don't think he was still naked and he didn't say that he was now naked while he was talking with God. I'm sorry but I think the question is flawed. Where does it say that Adam thinks he is "still naked"? That seems to be an incorrect assumption on the reader's part. If they took the time to ...


5

In fact, you are correct. In his commentary on Psa. 95:6, David Kimchi wrote,1 “Come! Let us worship…” – A man shall say this to his brothers, “Come! Let us worship,” because we are obligated to give thanks to Him and to bow before Him in all kinds of bowing. “Let us worship” (נשתחוה) refers to the flattening of the entire body on the ground, stretching out ...


5

Exodus 12:44 elaborates the phrase in question as, עֶבֶד אִישׁ מִקְנַת־כָּסֶף (eved ish miknat-kesef), “a slave, a man purchase of money.” Abraham was to circumcise both his own offspring (e.g., Ishmael, Isaac) as well as the slaves that he purchased from foreigners.1 Footnotes 1 cf. Lev. 25:44


5

In Gen. 2:19, it is written, “...whatever Adam called the living creature, this was its name.” Did Adam name each individual creature? No, rather, he named each “kind” or species of living creature, whether it be the “cow,” “goat,” “eagle,” etc. Likewise, in Gen. 5:2, when it is written that God “called their name אָדָם,” it is not referring to a personal ...


5

A few thoughts: (1) יוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי (yom hash-shish-shi) is a construct phrase where the adjective שִׁשִּׁי acts as a noun. The phrase literally means "the day of the sixth" or "the sixth's day" but can simply be understood as "the sixth day". This kind of construct where the last word is an adjective is not ungrammatical, but it ...


5

Jacob's blessing on Joseph is full of symbolism. Joseph himself is likened to a fruitful bough of a tree by a spring. The mention of the archers who bitterly attack him and harass him is a figure of speech; it is an oblique reference to how his brothers, who were jealous of Joseph, plotted to have him disposed of. But the 'Mighty One of Jacob'protected ...


5

Is there some link between the Egyptians refusing to eat with the Hebrews and the fact they were shepherds? - Yes. Khnum (𓎸𓅱𓀭) Sacrifice of rams, sheep & goats was detestable to the Egyptians, because Egyptians worshiped a false ram-idol named Khnum thought to be the creator of humanity by molding humans from clay. In context of Genesis 43:32 & ...


5

If you don't want to work with the original Hebrew, the King James Version is a very literal translation, and was written at a time when common English did distinguish between plural and singular second person. That translation makes a good reference for this kind of question: And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, ...


5

Joseph was pretending (as a ruse) to make himself look like a typical pagan ruler so as not to raise the suspicions of his brothers. Of course he would claim that he used the special cup for divination. According to Barnes (as per comments in Gen 44:5) and the Cambridge Commentary, such "hydromancy" was common for ancient rulers. However, Joseph ...


5

The difference is rather simple - the total family of Jacob was 70 people. Joseph had two children + Jacob himself were obviously four people. Therefore, we have: (a) 66 people other than Joseph's family and Jacob + (b) four people of Joseph's family + Jacob = 70 people in total. Note the difference in the carefully worded sentences: (a) all the people who ...


5

Tl;dr: No, I don't think there's consensus about how the Hebrew "זַרְעָ֑הּ ה֚וּא" should be translated, but the pronoun "she" doesn't seem to be justified in my view and receives little scholarly support. I found 2 good articles on Genesis 3:15 by OT scholars (no paywall): here and here. A non-journal article describing the Catholic ...


5

Nakedness was not the problem... Because prior to eating ... GEN 2:25 And the man and his wife were both naked and were not ashamed. The awareness of ‘nakedness’ came about because... GEN 3:7 Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked. The “key’ to understanding this verse is helped by looking at the Hebrew word behind ‘knew’. ...


4

The only other information available to us about the matter is in the description of Enoch's being taken in Hebrews 11:5 where the word metathesis is used which the KJV renders as 'translated'. The Greek word occurs only three times in scripture. Thayer says the word means a transposition, a change or an exchange. 'Metathesis' is used again in Hebrews 12:...


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