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10

Two different nakednesses are in view here. The fig leaves covered his physical nakedness but did nothing to quench his awareness that his newly defiled conscience was naked before God. The sequence bears this out: Their eyes were opened and they knew they were naked, they made fig leaf coverings for their nakedness, they heard God coming and hid because ...


6

Adam said, "...I was naked" - past tense. So I don't think he was still naked and he didn't say that he was now naked while he was talking with God. I'm sorry but I think the question is flawed. Where does it say that Adam thinks he is "still naked"? That seems to be an incorrect assumption on the reader's part. If they took the time to ...


5

Nakedness was not the problem... Because prior to eating ... GEN 2:25 And the man and his wife were both naked and were not ashamed. The awareness of ‘nakedness’ came about because... GEN 3:7 Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked. The “key’ to understanding this verse is helped by looking at the Hebrew word behind ‘knew’. ...


4

Was Genesis 41:49 literally true? It was both literally and metaphorically true. Let me explain. Genesis 41:49 Joseph stored up huge quantities of grain, like the sand of the sea; it was so much that he stopped keeping records because it was beyond measure Interestingly, even the English word "grain" can be used in two senses: countable and ...


3

Genesis 3:7 Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves. This only covers their physical nakedness. 8Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the Lord God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the Lord God among the ...


3

Yes, the Latin Vulgate has the error. I have come across other errors in Jerome's Latin Vulgate which I put down to certain learned biases that seeped into the church at Rome over the first 300 - 400 hundred years. The word "hu" from the original Hebrew is 3rd person singular and can be translated as either he, she, or it. (1) The word should ...


2

Stephen, as reported by Luke, in Acts, and the writer to the Hebrews, make it clear why this transaction means so much in regard to what was promised to Abraham, in the context of what he appeared to receive. Stephen states that 'the God of glory appeared to ... Abraham, when he was in Mesopotamia' and as a result Abraham removed to Canaan, wherein : he ...


2

How did Pharaoh find out that Sarai was Abram's wife? In short, the scriptures are silent in this matter. There is a second, similar account in Genesis chapter 20. This time it is the king of Gerar Abimelech that takes Sarai. But in this case, the scriptures tell us: But God came to Abimelech in a dream by night, and said to him, "Behold, thou art but ...


2

Adam said "ואירא כי עירם אנכי" — "and-I-was-afraid because naked I". There's no verb, thus no tense, in the second clause. He could have meant "I was afraid because I had been naked", "I was afraid because I was naked", or "I was afraid because I am naked". (The present tense of "be" is usually ...


2

Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges Ishvi] This name, omitted in Num., is probably due to the erroneous repetition of “Ishvah.” Another possibility is that Ishvah had no descendants.


2

Pyramids yes, 0’s no Ancient Egypt’s mathematical system did not have a “0”. 0 didn’t really solidify its place in mathematics until the 5th century (see here) This may seem a small issue until we consider the tremendous value of a placeholder in counting. To convey 4988 in Arabic numerals you need only 4 characters, and it takes but a split second to ...


1

The version of the OP is rather interpretive. Here is a more literal rendering Gen 23:6 (NASB) - “Hear us, my lord: you are a mighty prince among us; bury your dead in the choicest of our graves; none of us will refuse you his grave for burying your dead.” The word rendered (correctly) "mighty" here is actually, "elohim" = "God&...


1

Benson's commentary offers this - Genesis 38:17-21. A kid from the flock — A goodly price at which her chastity and honour were valued! Had the consideration been a thousand rams, and ten thousands of rivers of oil, it had not been a valuable consideration. The favour of God, the purity of the soul, the peace of the conscience, and the hope of heaven, are ...


1

You can certainly find some parallels to Gen 30.8 Younger versus Older Rachel wrestling with Leah would be one example of the younger wrestling with the older sibling, where God chooses the younger and rejects the older. This would be Abel vs Cain, Jacob and Esau, Rachel and Leah. So in terms of Jacob's life, I'd compare Rachel's wrestling with Leah with Gen ...


1

All languages have these types of parsing ambiguities that must be resolved via context or with the introduction of punctuation. In the MT, this punctuation would be the Masoretic cantillations, which group words into related groups of meanings to resolve exactly these types of ambigiuties. I've shown the cantillations for the verse in question, which ...


1

The lesser light rules the night and the stars This translation is not so tenable. The Hebrew conjunction for items in a simple series is the prefix וְ. In this verse, the conjunction is And [He made] וְאֵ֖ת (wə·’êṯ) Conjunctive waw | Direct object marker Strong's Hebrew 853: Untranslatable mark of the accusative case If the verb is "rules", the ...


1

The straightforward reading of the text is that although they had made the clothes, they hadn't put them on yet. Hence, they were still naked when they hear God. Note that in Genesis 3:21, God makes garments for Adam and Eve, and this is the first time in the text where it says they were actually clothed.


1

There are various answers given to this question in the traditional Jewish commentaries on these verses: There were two Korahs, one was Esau's son from Aholibamah (verse 14 and 18) and one was his grandson the son of Eliphaz who was Adah's firsborn (verses 15 and 16). See Chizkuni (citing Rashi on the Talmud) Korah was Eliphaz's son born from an incestual ...


1

One significance is that it served as an intergenerational family burial site: Genesis 49:29Then Jacob instructed them, “I am about to be gathered to my people. Bury me with my fathers in the cave in the field of Ephron the Hittite. 30The cave is in the field of Machpelah near Mamre, in the land of Canaan. This is the field Abraham purchased from Ephron the ...


1

There is some background cultural context to understand here. First in the conversation with the Hittites, Abraham says he wants his own burial site (v4). Then they offer to let him use one of theirs (v6), then Abraham presses that he wants buy his own site in verse 9. Then Ephron arises and says he will give to him, but here it is actually unclear if he ...


1

Genesis 1:16 New International Version God made two great lights--the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars. And [He made] וְאֵ֖ת (wə·’êṯ) Conjunctive waw | Direct object marker Strong's Hebrew 853: Untranslatable mark of the accusative case the stars {as well}. הַכּוֹכָבִֽים׃ (hak·kō·w·ḵā·ḇîm) ...


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