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18

This passage is absolutely critical in reading the old testament. It's right up there with the tree of knowledge, as it records the founding of Babylon, one of the two evil empires (along with Egypt). A good chunk of the bible has to do with struggles against or prophecies directed against Babylon, so its founding story is a big deal. Here is the text (LEB) ...


12

Hmm I am not so sure about the question not referring to Adam...if one reads Genesis 3.22... And the LORD God said, "The man has now become like one of us, knowing good and evil. He must not be allowed to reach out his hand and take also from the tree of life and eat, and live forever." "The man" in chapter 3 vs 22 is clearly Adam. I ...


10

Two different nakednesses are in view here. The fig leaves covered his physical nakedness but did nothing to quench his awareness that his newly defiled conscience was naked before God. The sequence bears this out: Their eyes were opened and they knew they were naked, they made fig leaf coverings for their nakedness, they heard God coming and hid because ...


6

Adam said, "...I was naked" - past tense. So I don't think he was still naked and he didn't say that he was now naked while he was talking with God. I'm sorry but I think the question is flawed. Where does it say that Adam thinks he is "still naked"? That seems to be an incorrect assumption on the reader's part. If they took the time to ...


5

Tl;dr: No, I don't think there's consensus about how the Hebrew "זַרְעָ֑הּ ה֚וּא" should be translated, but the pronoun "she" doesn't seem to be justified in my view and receives little scholarly support. I found 2 good articles on Genesis 3:15 by OT scholars (no paywall): here and here. A non-journal article describing the Catholic ...


5

Nakedness was not the problem... Because prior to eating ... GEN 2:25 And the man and his wife were both naked and were not ashamed. The awareness of ‘nakedness’ came about because... GEN 3:7 Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked. The “key’ to understanding this verse is helped by looking at the Hebrew word behind ‘knew’. ...


4

That Esau held murderous, revengeful intentions is stated explicitly: Gen 27:41 - Esau held a grudge against Jacob because of the blessing his father had given him. And Esau said in his heart, “The days of mourning for my father are at hand; then I will kill my brother Jacob.” Because Rebekah knew this she sent Jacob away to her brother's (Laban's) family. ...


4

If the word “horror” is taken as a key word, that will dispense with mere darkness. Yes, there are lots of mentions of darkness in the Bible, supernatural ones too, but how often is that associated with ghastly dread? And if we take the matter of the carcasses laid out by Abram before darkness comes, we may well think of the body of Christ nailed and lifted ...


4

Is this similar to the plague of darkness in Ex 10.21? Or Genesis 32.24, where Jacob wrestles with the Angel? I doubt it. Let's see how far we get... It'll help if one understands what "deep sleep" is in this context. The "deep sleep" can mean just a "deep sleep" or it can have have a divine intervention linked to it. In the ...


4

The Idiomatic Use of הוא As noted in this question Why does Genesis 3 use male pronouns for Eve? and the answers, the pronoun in question is הוּא which is properly masculine or neuter. But as Gesenius' Hebrew-Chaldee Lexicon states, in the Pentateuch it also takes in the feminine as an idiom. Therefore, from the use of language as found in the Mosaic Law, ...


4

Was Genesis 41:49 literally true? It was both literally and metaphorically true. Let me explain. Genesis 41:49 Joseph stored up huge quantities of grain, like the sand of the sea; it was so much that he stopped keeping records because it was beyond measure Interestingly, even the English word "grain" can be used in two senses: countable and ...


3

The Septuagint does contain the female pronoun at least in some manuscripts: καὶ ἔχθραν θήσω ἀνὰ μέσον σοῦ καὶ ἀνὰ μέσον τῆς γυναικὸς καὶ ἀνὰ μέσον τοῦ σπέρματός σου καὶ ἀνὰ μέσον τοῦ σπέρματος αὐτῆς· αὐτῆς is "of her" (singular feminine genitive) https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/physis/septuagint-genesis/3.asp?pg=2


3

Genesis 39:20 says that Potiphar put Joseph into the prison where the king’s prisoners were confined. The NIV Study Bible makes this comment: Potiphar put Joseph in the “house of the captain of the guard” (40:3) – certainly not the worst prison available. There is no information to back that up. However, the ESV Study Bible makes this comment: The law ...


3

According to this article by a Jewish OT scholar, the correct parallel for Noah's drunkenness is not Adam and Eve, but the time Lot gets drunk and his daughters sleep with him after Sodom and Gomorrah are destroyed. His argument is basically that both stories are meant to be the same genre of destruction story as the flood story in the Epic of Gilgamesh, a ...


3

The Hebrew expression (MUT TMUT) in this passage does not focus itself about a ‘kind’ of death, at all. In fact, this wording structure – really, a repetition of the same verb – points to a sureness of an action (or, of a condition), as I’ve explained in another answer (Why does the ESV use "surely" in Genesis 2:16 when all others say "freely&...


3

Rebekah knew his son Esau's behavior and predicted his anger would subside: Genesis 27:42 When Rebekah was told what her older son Esau had said, she sent for her younger son Jacob and said to him, “Your brother Esau is planning to avenge himself by killing you. 43Now then, my son, do what I say: Flee at once to my brother Laban in Harran. 44Stay with him ...


3

What did earrings have to do with idolatry? Aaron made the golden calf from earrings. Exodus 32:2 Aaron answered them, “Take off the gold earrings that your wives, your sons and your daughters are wearing, and bring them to me.” 3So all the people took off their earrings and brought them to Aaron. 4He took what they handed him and made it into an idol cast ...


3

Yes, the Latin Vulgate has the error. I have come across other errors in Jerome's Latin Vulgate which I put down to certain learned biases that seeped into the church at Rome over the first 300 - 400 hundred years. The word "hu" from the original Hebrew is 3rd person singular and can be translated as either he, she, or it. (1) The word should ...


3

Note the general instruction in Heb 13:2 Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have entertained angels without knowing it. Abraham and Lot were, in most respects, typical eastern men who practiced generous hospitality. It is almost certain that they were unaware that these "strangers" were as special as ...


3

There are some nomadic peoples on earth. Not many, in comparison to the vast majority who settle, farm, build and cultivate. It is estimated that in 1995 there were about 35 million nomadic persons in the world, at a time when the global population was 5.7 billion, that is about 0.6%. The earth was very different after the Flood, compared to previously. ...


3

Genesis 3:7 Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves. This only covers their physical nakedness. 8Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the Lord God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the Lord God among the ...


3

Adam said "ואירא כי עירם אנכי" — "and-I-was-afraid because naked I". There's no verb, thus no tense, in the second clause. He could have meant "I was afraid because I had been naked", "I was afraid because I was naked", or "I was afraid because I am naked". (The present tense of "be" is usually ...


2

Laban worshiped idols: Genesis 31:19 Berean Study Bible Now while Laban was out shearing his sheep, Rachel stole her father’s household idols [teraphim]. Laban was a polytheist. He believed in many gods, including his version of the LORD. That's why he could say to Jacob in Genesis 24:31 "Come, you who are blessed by the LORD." Laban didn't say ...


2

In https://biblehub.com/genesis/27-39.htm, 12 versions translate it as "away from" fatness of the land and 7 versions say Esau would dwell in the fatness of the land. Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges https://biblehub.com/commentaries/hebrews/11-20.htm By faith Isaac blessed Jacob and Esau] It is true that the blessing of Esau when rightly ...


2

I believe Saro is correct, but want to provide some additional comments. A lot of the answers are launching into a theological interpretation of Adam's death, which is fine, but I'd like to just focus on understanding the text of these passages by providing some background material, so we can understand better what these passages are saying, regardless of ...


2

Genesis 1:16 New International Version God made two great lights--the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars. And [He made] וְאֵ֖ת (wə·’êṯ) Conjunctive waw | Direct object marker Strong's Hebrew 853: Untranslatable mark of the accusative case the stars {as well}. הַכּוֹכָבִֽים׃ (hak·kō·w·ḵā·ḇîm) ...


2

To understand the political dynamics of Joseph (and his house) with respect to Pharoah, it's good to know the background and what was driving this dynamic. In Gen 45, Pharoah is in a weakened position of authority, which is why he turns to Joseph. Joseph advises Pharoah to execute a plan that will turn Egypt into a centrally controlled slave society with ...


2

Joseph was 30 years of age when God enabled him to interpret Pharaoh’s dreams with regard to the seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine. Pharaoh then placed Joseph in charge of his palace and the whole land of Egypt. Joseph was second-in-command to Pharaoh (Genesis 41:41-44). Later, Jacob is brought to Egypt and, at age 130, was presented ...


2

Genesis 41:29 Seven years of great abundance are coming throughout the land of Egypt, 30 but seven years of famine will follow them. Joseph was extremely useful to Pharoah during the 7 years and plenty and the 7 years of famine, so he was the 2nd in command after only Pharoah. However, it was some years after the end of the famine that Jacob died. Genesis ...


2

Job lost everything, a great reset for his life. Guess what was the first word that came out of his mouth: yes, you guessed it: naked. Job 1:21 and said: "Naked I came from my mother's womb, and naked I will depart. The LORD gave and the LORD has taken away; may the name of the LORD be praised." Another strange coincidence? I guess when you restart ...


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