10

The idea of a "son" in first century Christian writings was different than it is today. The term "son" simply signified that he came from God and bore His image. (examples) Both of these things are true of Adam: Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness . . . " God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created ...


9

While Luke indeed points out in his Gospel that Joseph was of the house of David,1 it is curious why this was of importance to the narrative, since Jesus was conceived without the seed of Joseph. This led many early Christian Church Fathers and scholars to propose that Mary is also of the house and lineage of David.2 From here several hypotheses emerged to ...


6

Most commentators circle around the ideas that these are either Jewish genealogies or an unknown Gnostic type of genealogies that include angels. However there seems to be strong support that the pastorals speak of a particularly Jewish disturbance, as compared to say Colossians which may have been related to a mystic type of Jewish Gnosticism, somewhat ...


6

It cannot be deduced that Naphtali had sex with Bilhah by the Biblical texts. 1 Chronicles 7:13 is not saying that Naphtali had his children with Bilhah. Bilhah is mentioned in 1 Chronicles 7:13 because Naphtali was her second son by Jacob, according to Genesis 30:1-8. Naphtali's sons can be rightly called her sons as well. In fact, some translations render ...


5

No. Only Reuven slept with Bilhah. When it says "בְּנֵ֥י בִלְהָֽה" ("[these are the] sons of Bilhah"), it is not referring only to the four sons of Naftali mentioned in verse 13, but to all of the descendants of Bilhah mentioned, from verse 1 to verse 13. This is parallel to the verses in Genesis 46:23-25: וּבְנֵי־דָ֖ן חֻשִֽׁים׃ וּבְנֵ֖י ...


5

Note that the Book of Genesis describes the physical birth of the two twins, Perez and Zerah, in great detail. (Genesis 38:27-30) By mentioning the two together, Matthew brings to mind their birth and consequentially the circumstances of their birth; namely, that they were a result of Judah's abominable fornication. Now, you might object that, if Matthew's ...


5

According to the Bible, Noah's father was Lamech. For the purpose of this question, we assume that Adam, Lamech and Noah were actual, historical people, we get: Adam lived for 930 years(Genesis 5:5) Lamech was lived for 777 years (Masoretic text, 653 years (Samaritan text) or 753 years (Septuagint text). Going by the Masoretic text, but in any case, Lamech ...


4

Rashi cites the Midrash Bereshit Rabba (80:11) as saying that this was a son of Simeon with his sister Dena. the son of the Canaanitess: The son of Dinah, who had been possessed by a Canaanite. When they killed Shechem, Dinah did not want to leave until Simeon swore to her that he would marry her -[Gen. Rabbah (80:11)]. The Midrash Bereshit Rabba cites a ...


4

In regard to the specific request regarding background information from scripture about Abram's the mother one has to say the bible is virtually silent The Bible does not identify Abram's mother, only his father. Gen 11:26-27 Now Terah lived seventy years, and begot Abram, Nahor, and Haran.This is the genealogy of Terah: Terah begot Abram, Nahor, and ...


4

Salmon (or Salma/Salmah) is certainly mentioned in the Old Testament as being a descendant of Judah and an ancestor of David: Nahshon was the father of Salmon, Salmon the father of Boaz - 1 Chronicles 2:11 NIV Which agrees with: ...Nahshon the father of Salmon, Salmon the father of Boaz... Ruth 4:20-21 NIV Where Matthew mentions Rahab, it is generally ...


4

The 6th century BC is when some scholars believe the story of David and Goliath was written, not when it actually took place. For example, Jacob L. Wright, Associate Professor of Hebrew Bible at Emory University, has written that the most popular legends about David, including his killing of Goliath, his affair with Bathsheba, and his ruling of a United ...


4

Yes, Adam lived long enough to be able to see Lamech - Noah's father. :) TimeLine from Adam to Flood


4

Because it's not entirely a genealogy Korah also appears in 1 Chron 6:38, so it is unlikely this his rebellion in Numbers 16 was the cause of him being omitted from a later chapter in 1 Chron. The one "son of Izhar" mentioned in your verse, 23:18, is Shelomith, who is not among Izhar's sons listed in Exodus 6:21, Korah, Nepheg, and Zichri. It's not only ...


3

The Son of a ‘Canaanitish’ Woman The list of Simeon’s sons in Gen.46:10 states that the last named son, Shaul (or Saul), was “the son of a Canaanite woman”. Shaul’s designation is unique among Simeon’s sons whose mothers are not otherwise identified, unique even among Jacob’s 12 sons and many grandsons named in the family record as they arrived in Egypt (...


3

The complete record of the birth of Moses has been divided into two parts. Details covering the birth are placed first (Exodus 2:1-10); his genealogy is second (Exodus 6:14-25). Each of the two records serves as a type of introduction to the two primary phases of his life. After his birth Moses lived in Pharaoh’s house as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. After ...


3

List of Firstborns? Not Necessarily In the Sepher Ṯōl'ḏōṯ, or Generations Book, of Genesis 5 the very first son (Seth) listed, as is evident from Genesis's immediately preceding chapter, is actually not a firstborn son. Seth is Adam's third son, who, as the story apparently says in Ch. 4, is born when his brothers Cain and Abel are already full-grown (...


3

The problem occurs in v. 10 as well, where variant readings between "Amos" and "Amon" occur. That is, like "Asaph" and "Asa," the words are near homonyms with the respective psalmist Asaph and prophet Amos. In this regard, the late Bruce Metzger (1994) comments as follows on these verses: 1:7–8 Ἀσάφ, Ἀσάφ {B} It ...


3

There are basically two main theories as to why Zephaniah's genealogy goes back four generations: In order to connect him to Hezekiah, who is in turn thought to be the reforming king In order to establish him as a Judahite despite being the son of someone named Cushi (which might imply he was Cushite) As to the second idea, the main hole in the theory is ...


3

God tells Abraham of a period of 400 years, a rounded number, Genesis 15:13, from the time of the children of Israel going down to Egypt until their deliverance in the exodus. Paul seems to have researched this and to have calculated the period exactly, to 430 years, in Galatians 3:17. This period of time amply accommodates the generations Judah, Phares, ...


3

They are the indeed the same. Just as this is the same Elkanah from Exodus 6:24. He is not listed as from the tribe of Ephraim in 1 Samuel 1. He is listed only as an Ephraimite (or Ephrathite as some translations use the word) in the sense that he lived in the land of Ephraim. This can be a bit confusing at times and the precursor of a geographical ...


3

I Chronicles 3: 15-18 catalogues four men : Josiah, Jehoiakim, Jeconiah and Salathiel : the sons of Josiah - Jehoiakim (v15) and the sons of Jehoiakim - Jeconiah (v16) and the sons of Jeconiah - Salathiel (v17) The first 'Jeconiah' referred to by Matthew (Matthew 1:11) is the father, also called 'Jehoiakim' in Chronicles. The second 'Jeconiah' referred to ...


2

Leon R. Kass, author of The Beginning of Wisdom: Reading Genesis says that the line of ten generations from Adam to Noah begs to be compared to the seven generations from Cain to the sons of Lamech. Genesis chapter 4 Adam Cain Enoch Irad Mehujael Methusael Lamech Genesis chapter 5 Adam Seth Enos Cainan (Cain) Mahalaleel (Mehujael) Jared (Irad) Enoch (...


2

In my research on the use of numerology in Genesis, I found: Shem is given as living 600 years Arphaxad lived 438 years - 35 years before the birth of Salah (11:12) and 403 after (11:13) Salah lived 433 years - 30 years before the birth of Eber and 403 years after (11:14-15). Eber lived 464 years - 34 years before the birth of Peleg and 430 years after (11:...


2

Who Was Rahab The Harlot? In Matthew 1:5 her name is Rachab Ῥαχάβ (which appears only once in the Bible) in KJV. Most bibles have it INCORRECTLY as 'Rahab'. Rahab of Cannaan Conquest (Joshua 2:1; 6:22-25) Ῥαὰβ (James 2:25; Hebrews 11:31) is a different person. For those interested, see a new translation of NT.


2

TL:DR - Hebrew genealogies are sometimes exact, but sometimes they are a less exact line of succession with a theological purpose. Differences in purpose can account for the differences in similar genealogies. The Purpose of Hebrew Genealogies In order to understand the answer first here are some some general insights into Hebrew Genealogies. Hebrew ...


2

The purpose of inserting the genealogy in the middle of Exodus 6:10-30 could aim to contrast the inability of Moses with the election by God. Among the hundreds of thousands of Israel's descendants, only two were chosen to speak to Pharaoh. They were Moses and Aaron. The preceding paragraph (6:10-12) and the succeeding paragraph (6:28-30) form the ...


2

The major differences between the Septuagint and the Masoretic text is in the year of Methuselah's death and in the presence of Cainan as the son of Arphaxad and father of Salah in the Septuagint, but not in the Masoretic (or Samaritan) text. Methuselah There is no earlier manuscript available to us that explains the discrepancy in the year of Methuselah's ...


2

The New Testament genealogies of Jesus contain many puzzles, of which the family surrounding Salathiel (Shealtiel) is just one: Matthew, in agreement with 1 Chronicles 3:17, says that Salathiel was the son of Jechonias, whereas Luke says that he was the son of Neri. Whereas Jechonias was a king, Neri was a commoner, from a long line of commoners, so there ...


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