15

Summarizing Hastings Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels entry on wine bottles: In ancient Israel, the grapes were pressed in the winepress and left in the collection vats for a few days. Fermentation starts immediately on pressing, and this allows the first "tumultuous" (gassy) phase to pass. Then the must (fermenting juice) was put in clay jars ...


13

Ruth instigates her right to remarriage to Boaz as the next of kin by uncovering his feet. This imagery of foot uncovering (in the context of the kinsman-redeemer) comes from the Law of Moses - Deuteronomy 25:9 (NASB) 9 Then shall his brother's wife come unto him in the presence of the elders, and loose his shoe from off his foot, and spit in his face, ...


9

The original question contained a link to the interesting article by Rendsburg 1988: http://jewishstudies.rutgers.edu/docman/rendsburg/64-the-mock-of-baal-in-1-kings-18-27/file Has anyone else looked at it? The author argues that śiăḥ and śiḡ are a hendiadys. śiḡ or siḡ is well-known in the meaning “go away, step aside”, and can thus reasonably be ...


7

After Jesus becomes harsh and gets the scribes' and Pharisees' attention, Matthew 12:34 (NASB) “You brood of vipers, how can you, being evil, speak what is good? For the mouth speaks out of that which fills the heart.” two verses later he reminds and warns them of judgment day. Matthew 12:36-37 (NASB) “But I tell you that every careless word that people ...


7

The idea of the verses 18-20 speaks about things that won't leave any "tracks" after they act: the eagle in the sky, the snake on the rocks, the ship in the water and relations between man and woman ( not a virgin one - עלמה so it won't leave tracks): NIV Proverbs 30: 18“There are three things that are too amazing for me, four that I do not ...


7

This argument about the Holy Spirit being "pourable" is specious because it is based on an idiom with which we are unfamiliar. Note the following that discusses other people being "poured out": Lam 2:19 - Arise, cry out in the night from the first watch of the night. Pour out your heart like water in the presence of the Lord. Ps 22;14 - ...


6

When Jesus speaks the words "being salted with fire," he is probably referring back to the the verse in Leviticus 2:13 which reads,(NIV) Season all your grain offerings with salt.do not leave the salt of your covenant of your God out of your grain offerings,add salt to your offerings. Also In Leviticus 2:16 we read, The Priest shall burn the ...


6

Psalm 140:9-11 provides one possible answer, since there appears the same parallel of coals falling upon the head. Most English translations group verses 9-11 as one paragraph; the LXX and Masoretic Text (MT) group the entire psalm as one unit. Psalm 140:9-11 (NASB) 9 As for the head of those who surround me, May the mischief of their lips cover them. ...


6

This is a great question, but please allow me to provide some background first in order to answer this question. First, there are two "sacraments" in view: baptism and the bread & cup. Paul indicates that the Israelites coming from Egypt were "baptized" and subsequently ate the manna (bread) and spiritual drink (cup). However, they did not enter the ...


6

Another answer addressed the issue of Samaritan rejection of one traveling to Jerusalem, so I will attempt to address your other question: Why does this use "his face" instead of simply "him"? What is the difference supposed to be? The difference is a Semitic flavor and the emphatic sense of the Semitic idiom behind it. The word πρόσωπον = face is ...


6

Background In his paper The Mock of Baal in 1 Kings 18:27, Gary A. Rendsburg explains the issue: …Elijah began to taunt his opponents about the inefficacy of their god. His exact words are as follows: “shout in a loud voice, for he is a god, kî śîaḥ wêḵî śîg lō, or he may be on a journey, or perhaps he is sleeping or waking up.” (1 Kgs 18:27) The ...


5

The natural antipathy between the old (Judaism) and the new (Jesus's message) is what Jesus spoke of in His wineskin/garment analogies. He thought Judaism was brittle and inflexible, like an old wineskin, or a worn-out garment not fit to wear. In Jesus' day, unfermented grape juice was placed in wineskins instead of bottles. If the wineskin container was ...


5

Is Jesus' description of Gehenna (Hell) literal or figurative? This is an admittedly difficult subject because we do not recognize our wretchedness before God. The reason that animal sacrifices were so gruesome was that God wants us to know what sin represents to Him, in contrast to His absolute majesty, holiness, and perfection. A couple of passages from ...


5

God revealed himself in literal fire a number of times. He appeared in a burning bush to Moses, Exodus 3:1-6. Fire came out of the tabernacle from before the Lord and consumed upon the altar the burnt offering .. and the people shouted and fell upon their face, Leviticus 9:24. This in the inauguration of the Aaronic priesthood. But some thought to mimic this ...


5

When shall we see Jesus "face to face"? The simplest direct answer is found in Rev 22:3, 4 - No longer will there be any curse. The throne of God and of the Lamb will be within the city, and His servants will worship Him. They will see His face, and His name will be on their foreheads. To be with Jesus is the primary reward of the saved saints ...


4

With above sentences the writer (not sure if this is Agur or the son of Jakeh) is talking about the 7th and 4th item. For example: 3 things amazes him and there is even a 4th thing that amazes him even more. The book of Proverbs is completely in poetic form. It contains different variations and combinations of basic forms of parallelism, a distinguishing ...


4

Since Satan, the accuser, does not want to believe in Job's blamelessness, he seeks to depreciate or impugn Job's character by saying in effect, "Job's so-called blamelessness is attributable to a bargain he made with you, God. It's an even exchange: He'll be blameless if you give him the lifestyle to which he's become accustomed." In other words, Satan ...


4

The Idea in Brief The word “hand” in Is 57:8 appears to be euphemistic reference for the aroused anatomy of the male phallus. (The double-entendre also appears evident in Song of Solomon 5:4 and Song of Solomon 5:14.) Since the dual use of the word “hand” in the context of love is very explicit in Ugaritic texts, the same double-entendre for “hand” is ...


4

In Exodus, it is written that “the LORD used to speak to Moses face to face, just as a man speaks to his friend” (Ex 33:11). But in the same passage (Ex 33:20), God tells Moses, “You cannot see My face, for no man can see Me and live!” Though Moses could speak to God with the level of intimacy of a friend, he had to be shielded from seeing the actual face of ...


4

In all the references quoted by the OP, the word "hand" is NOT in the text. There are many places where this idea is present. Possibly the most complete is in Rev 5:1 which has the phrase (similar to most such references): ἐπὶ τὴν δεξιὰν τοῦ καθημένου ἐπὶ τοῦ θρόνου = "on the right of the one sitting on the throne" Again, note that &...


3

Throughout the Old and New Testaments, there was a strong connection between serpents, evil and the underworld and this connection extended into most other mesopotamian cultures as well. Because of this association, serpents developed a highly negative connotation and any association with them was thus considered offensive. This however is a pretty ...


3

His Kingdom Prophecy lists a couple of interesting interpretations. for example, they quote Kenneth Samuel Wuest (1893-1962): In Bible times an oriental needed to keep his hearth fire going all the time in order to insure fire for cooking and warmth. If it went out, he had to go to a neighbour for some live coals of fire. These he would carry on ...


3

I will answer your “Question 1”, as this is not addressed in the earlier question. In Classical Greek πιστεύω means “trust, put faith in, rely on” and takes an object in the dative or accusative; it is never (as far as I can see) construed with the prepositions ἐν or εἰς. This construction is, however, commonplace in LXX and NT, e.g. Ps. 77:22, where ὅτι ...


3

There are only 4 instances of kə·sūṯ (Strong's H3682) in the Old Testament: Genesis 20:16, Job 24:7, Job 26:6 and Job 31:19, each of which is associated with "covering" nakedness. Adding to that the "thou shalt not uncover the nakedness of" expression of the KJV in Leviticus 18, becoming "you shall not have sexual relations with" in the NIV, there can be ...


3

Consider understanding: a) Judges 19: 4-5, and the difference between the Hebrew text and the Greek text (LXX). His father-in-law, the girl’s father, persuaded him to stay with him for three days, and they ate and drank together, and spent the night there. On the fourth day they woke up early and the Levite got ready to leave. But the girl’s father said to ...


3

The exhortations regarding 'Raca' and 'fool' are bracketed by two conditions. Firstly, Jesus says in verse 22, 'whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause ...' This is a matter between brethren. It is not a matter of distant strangers falling out. And it concerns some one being angry when there is no just cause for his anger. Secondly, Jesus ...


3

In a sense, Scripture preserves for us the voice of God. God, after He spoke long ago to the fathers in the prophets in many portions and in many ways, 2 in these last days has spoken to us in His Son – Heb 1:1-2 (NASB) That the story of the sheep and the shepherd is a parable indicates that the individual elements are not meant to be taken literally. ...


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