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14

Unlike English, Greek is a heavily (or highly) inflected language.1 In English, one could say/write, “One Lord, one faith, one baptism,” and the adjective “one” does not change spelling according to the noun it modifies. Footnotes         1 Chadwick, Ch. 4, p. 35 However, in Greek, the typical adjective will decline2 according to:3 Footnotes         2 To ...


11

All the words for "one" are different declensions of the same word (εἷς, μία, ἕν in the lexicon). It is declined to match the noun it modifies. ἓν - is nominative neuter singular μιᾷ - is dative feminine sigular (in a prepositional phrase) εἷς - is nominative masculine singular μία - is nominative feminine sigular There are sites like the following ...


6

Luke 3:6 does in fact say: “And all flesh shall see the salvation of God” (KJV). (και οψεται πασα σαρξ το σωτηριον του θεου). And then 1 Cor. 15:39 says: “All flesh is not the same flesh: but there is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds”. (ου πασα σαρξ η αυτη σαρξ αλλα αλλη μεν ανθρωπων αλλη δε σαρξ ...


5

Gen 15:6 is completely ambiguous in masoretic manuscript. Any translation that does not preserve this ambiguity is in fact an interpretation. The verse has two third person verbs, "he believed" and "he accounted", the second with a direct object pronoun "he accounted it/him", and one proposition phrase with the explicit third person pronoun "him", "...


5

"Faith" here is used in a broad way. The fuller context is: [21] It is good not to eat meat or drink wine or do anything that causes your brother to stumble. [22] The faith that you have, keep between yourself and God. Blessed is the one who has no reason to pass judgment on himself for what he approves. [23] But whoever has doubts is condemned ...


5

This is an interesting question. To put this verse into context we must begin with chapter 12 where we learn that G-d commands Avram to leave his home and to go to some place G-d will eventually show him and therein make from him a "great nation." Gen. 12:1. He goes -- at the age of 75 and childless, bringing with him his wife and nephew. At Gen. 12:7, G-...


5

τῇ γὰρ χάριτί ἐστε σεσῳσμένοι διὰ πίστεως διὰ is a preposition which is, technically, ad "verbal adjective." Participles usually introduce participial phrases which can serve either adverbially or adjectivally ("Running for your life." vs. "Hair of white.") and, as such, can take on a wide variety of meanings. To further widen the range, they can also be ...


5

Jesus didn't say "blessed are those who believe with no evidence." He said "blessed are those who have not seen and still believe." We have the evidence of eye witnesses. This is the disciple who is bearing witness about these things, and who has written these things, and we know that his testimony is true. (John 21:24, ESV) 3 For I ...


4

The word "world" (κοσμος) can have a number of meanings other than "every human being without exception," which is how it is often taken. A.W. Pink maintained that there are 7 uses for the word "world" and John Own offered (I believe) 16. In John's gospel there are a few meanings present, ranging from "every human being without exception" to "all nations of ...


4

This passage would have been understood according to its plain meaning, and in the context of the previous passages, that is, that after G-d promised Abram something almost unbelievable, Abram truly believed and we are told that he was rewarded for this act of faith. Just before this passage, G-d spoke to Abram and said: (Genesis 15:3) "Do not be afraid, ...


4

The Greek text of the passage you mention is as follows: ΚΑΤΑ ΙΩΑΝΝΗΝ 3:15-16 (SBLGNT) 15 ἵνα πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων ἐν αὐτῷ ἔχῃ ζωὴν αἰώνιον. 16 Οὕτως γὰρ ἠγάπησεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν κόσμον ὥστε τὸν υἱὸν τὸν μονογενῆ ἔδωκεν, ἵνα πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων εἰς αὐτὸν μὴ ἀπόληται ἀλλὰ ἔχῃ ζωὴν αἰώνιον. One possible literal translation of the text: John 3:15-16 (YLT) 15 that ...


4

Every attempt being made to understand the meaning of “the faith of Jesus" with spotlight on Revelation 14:12 must be carefully balanced with different scriptures where the word "faith" appears. To start with, King James and ESV did not render the phrase the same way. Here is the patience of the saints: here are they that keep the commandments of God, ...


4

Why would we think that seeking to be justified by Jesus Christ would somehow suggest that we are found to be sinners? The notion is that Christ made those Jewish Christians who sought to be justified in Him sinners because he led them to abandon the Law. In this sense, Christ could be accused of being a minister of sin. How is rebuilding things that we ...


4

Luke 17:5-10 (DRB) And the apostles said to the Lord: Increase our faith. 6 And the Lord said: If you had faith like to a grain of mustard seed, you might say to this mulberry tree, Be thou rooted up, and be thou transplanted into the sea: and it would obey you. 7 But which of you having a servant ploughing, or feeding cattle, will say to him, when he is ...


4

I think, for Jews there is no rough distinction between Faith and Works as we perceive it today. For jews (the new testament writers are jews) to have faith is to trust in God and accept his leadership upon you and submit to his will. So faith is not something other than following God/Jesus and doing his commandmends. If anyone loves (believes in) Jesus he ...


4

A very good and original question, for it deals with an apparent illogicality of the question: if the disciples think that the boat is to sink, then it will sink with all aboard, the sleeping Jesus included, for it is absolutely counterintuitive that the disciples entertained an idea that the boat would sink with all of them together, except for the sleeping ...


3

Good question. First I would suggest not going by a fringe, unorthodox source like Jesuswordsonly.com. Secondly, I claim no Hebrew expertise, but point out that the normal understanding of this verse — that God counted Abram's faith as righteousness — has been agreed upon by both Jews and Christians for eons. This is evidenced by the Septuagint — the 2nd-...


3

John 1 Jesus is referenced here as the Word, God, and Light. Taken from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/john_1:1 John 1:1 is the first verse in the opening chapter of the Gospel of John. In the Douay–Rheims, King James, New International, and other versions of the Bible, the verse reads: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the ...


3

It strikes me that the phrase might be more important; "believe in him" which is translated from "pisteuwn eis auton." The same phrase appears two verses later exactly (to begin verse 18), but the ending of verse 18 is "he that does not believe is condemned" from "pepisteuken eis to onoma" (not believed the name). From this I surmise the issue is belief in ...


3

The actual Greek phrases in question are: John 3:15 - πιστεύων ἐν αὐτῷ = believing in Him John 3:16 - πιστεύων εἰς αὐτὸν = believing in Him In both cases, the phrase is almost "naked" meaning that we simply "believe" - but is this the real meaning? According to BDAG, the verb πιστεύω has the following meanings: to consider something to ...


3

This is more of a theological question since the text itself doesn't really make this explicit. The English translation you've given is a good rendering of this passage into English. The text is clear that "you have [already] been saved," as it is perfect (completed action), but whether faith was a one-time event or ongoing necessity is not immediately clear ...


3

I think Jesus' use of "Israel" here and elsewhere ignores Rome's geopolitical impositions and points directly to the nation itself. The people, all of Abraham's natural descendants, are often referred to as "Israel" throughout the gospels, for example: Matthew 15:24 - I am not sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel. Luke 22:30 - That ye ...


3

Gal. chap. 2 is wrestling with those who kept coming in to the 1st century assemblies and telling them they had to keep the law; ie. be circumcised, etc. The background then is whether they were still under the law, or under grace through Christ. Gal. 2:3:4, "3 but not even Titus, who [is] with me, being a Greek, was compelled to be circumcised -- 4 ...


3

I think there is a small error in your premise regarding the rich young ruler. Yes, Jesus did say "keep the commandments" (Matthew 19:17), but when the matter was pressed, Jesus fleshed out the answer, indicating what the real issue was: the rich, young ruler was not quite as perfect at following the commandments of God as he had claimed. In Matthew 19:20, ...


3

Let's take a look at the whole chapter. Romans 4 (DRB)1 What shall we say then that Abraham hath found, who is our father according to the flesh. 2 For if Abraham were justified by works, he hath whereof to glory, but not before God. 3 For what saith the scripture? Abraham believed God, and it was reputed to him unto righteousness. 4 Now to him that ...


3

Your question, I believe, is one of the most important questions anyone can ever ask. But actually, the answer will take you into territory which is very familiar to you. We are saved by grace, not by works. But if we are saved by grace then why does the NT speak of the law? We are saved in order that we might learn to live a life that is pleasing to God....


3

"Faith" in Greek is πίστις (pistis). The exact same word is translated in English as "belief". In New Testament Greek there is no distinction between the two. True faith in the Lord is true belief in Him and vice versa. If one truly believes in Christ, one follows His commandments. These are enumerated quite clearly in the Gospel, especially the Sermon ...


3

Faith and belief are both from the word πίστις which means 'to be persuaded'. Biblical faith reflects two interlocking dynamics. The first is the mental acceptance of a set of facts which we regard as doctrine, the second is the action that responds to those convictions. Belief is the fundamental structure for salvation, but belief is never presented in ...


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