We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

Hot answers tagged

15

As other answers have noted, there are a number of discrepancies between the lists of Ezra 2 and Nehemiah 7 which are, largely, duplicate passages. In the case of Ezra 2:65 and Nehemiah 7:67, there is a specific textual circumstance to explain the present text. At some very early point in Nehemiah's transmission, a scribe's eye has jumped from the "200" of ...


15

What are the reasons for identifying Ezra's Artaxerxes as Artaxerxes I vs Artaxerxes II? Why is there a problem? In Ezra 7:7, reference is made to Ezra's arrival in Jerusalem in "the seventh year of King Artaxerxes" (= 458 BCE), as depicted earlier in the chapter: 7:1 Now after these things, in the reign of Artaxerxes king of Persia, Ezra ... 7:6 ... ...


12

The short answer is "No". Perhaps there is a little confusion at work here, because this verse is embedded in one of the Aramaic passages found in the (otherwise) Hebrew Bible: it is not in Hebrew.1 The "-ah" ending that makes this look like "prophetess" (if the word was in Hebrew), is in fact the Aramaic definite article, = "the". (See heading 2.2, bullet #...


10

H.G.M. Williamson once wrote of this problem:1 No fully satisfactory explanation has been offered as to why [Darius] is called 'the king of Assyria'. That hasn't stopped people trying, of course.2 Certain possibilities come to the fore: It's fairly clear that the succession of empires that is so clear to us had its hazy edges in antiquity.3 There is ...


6

Ezra's contemporary Haggai provided additional insight. Haggai 2:1 on the twenty-first day of the seventh month, the word of the Lord came through the prophet Haggai: 2“Speak to Zerubbabel son of Shealtiel, governor of Judah, to Joshua son of Jozadak, a the high priest, and to the remnant of the people. Ask them, 3‘Who of you is left who saw this house in ...


5

"Obviously" this is contradiction. One contradiction that can be explained in different ways. Simple scribal error. Very unsatisfactory answer, but possible, however likely, or unlikely. From within the text or concordant with the narrative. We have two different people acting here: Ezra and Nehemiah. They may have counted differently or at different times ...


4

Excellent question. It was the second temple. More specifically it was King Herod's rebuilt second temple. He began the project in 19 BC and aspects of this rebuild lasted 75 years. This information is from the book 'Ready to Rebuild' by Thomas Ice and Randall Price. We would not consider King Herod's rebuild a 3rd temple, even based on his own description ...


4

Introduction : In the history of the First Persian Empire, there are three kings called The Great : Cyrus, Xerxes, and Darius. Their almost consecutive rules spanned for 65 of the 75 years ranging from about 540 to 465 BC, save for a small period of less than a decade (roughly 530–520 BC), ruled by two minor kings. The Book of Ezra mentions four names ...


4

This question has stymied Bible historians for years; if the following ages of the Kings of Persia had been as they have been historically listed(Darius Hystaspis-Ezra 6:15) and (Artaxerxes-Ezra 7:1), there would be a 49 year gap, which would have put Ezra at the age of 121 when he left Babylon, hardly a thought worth considering. This also 'adds' Daniel's ...


4

The Rev. Joseph Benson notes in his commentary on Daniel 10:1, In the third year of Cyrus king of Persia — That is, the third after the death of Darius. Daniel must now have been above ninety years of age. It is reasonable to suppose that, being a youth when he was carried captive, he must have been at least twenty years of age; and that was seventy-three ...


4

In Ezra 1:5 we are told, “Then rose up the chief of the fathers of Judah and Benjamin, and the priests, and the Levites, with all them whose spirit God had raised, to go up to build the house of the Lord which is in Jerusalem.” Also, that the Spirit of God stirred up the spirit of king Cyrus to authorise the rebuilding in the first place (vs. 1). This was in ...


3

Background On the detail of the number of singers, all of the textual evidence is in agreement: Nehemiah has recorded 245 and Ezra 200. There is no textual evidence to support treating these numbers as other than original to each. However, it is misleading to claim there is a contradiction solely on the fact the numbers are different. After all, if there ...


3

Esarhaddon’s first campaign against Egypt in 673 BCE failed. He had rushed his troops into battle and was repulsed by Pharaoh Tirhakah and Egyptian forces in the eastern delta. But according to the Ancient History Encyclopedia: Esarhaddon learned from his mistake and, in 671 BCE, took his time and brought a much larger army slowly down through ...


3

The law clearly states for most of the nations mentioned in Ezra 9 and 10 that the marriage is illegal (compare the law in Deuteronomy 7:3 to Ezra's own description of the transgression in Ezra 9:12). The response in Ezra 10:3 states explicitly that they will break the marriage covenants "by the law". The marriages never had a legal footing, and are ...


3

In the Aramaic original Ezra 5:12 reads: לָהֵן מִן־דִּי הַרְגִּזוּ אֲבָהָתַנָא לֶאֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא ‏ “but since our fathers angered the God of Heaven”. In the Masoretic text the first word is vocalised as lāhen “but”, a word that is relatively common in Old Aramaic, but is not used in later stages of Aramaic. It seems that the authors of the LXX read it as (...


3

What is meant by "Ezra prepared his heart to seek the Law of the LORD"? In context to Ezra 7:25, the main purpose of “Ezra prepared his heart to seek the Torah of YHVH” (עֶזְרָא֙ הֵכִ֣ין לְבָב֔וֹ לִדְרֹ֛שׁ אֶת־תּוֹרַ֥ת יְהֹוָ֖ה) in [Ezra 7:10] directly relates to Ezra’s commission to interpret/translate the ancient Hebrew Torah scrolls for an ...


3

The account of weeping and joy is ambiguous and the narrative does not resolve the ambiguity. Were they weeping because the first temple was so much better than the second ? Or were they weeping with gratitude to see the second, expressing the deeper feelings of experienced and aged elders, rather then the lesser elation of the joyfulness of enthusiastic, ...


2

The Elephantine papyri give the answer: The Elephantine papyri mention the high priest Johanan, also mentioned in Ezra 10:6, as a contemporary of Darius II ! Therefore Darius in Ezra 6:1 = Darius II and Artachshashta/Artaxerxes in Ezra 7:7 = Artaxerxes II. Now Cyrus the Great at Ezra 1 seems out of place. Here you would expect his grandson Xerxes who ...


2

Yes there is Talmudic evidence that - at least - some parts were modeled after Ezekiel's temple. There are few places in the Mishna in Middot (2:5; 3:1; 4:1; 4:2) where it is explicitly stated that parts of the second temple were modeled after Ezekiel's vision. For example, there were two chambers on the sides of the "Big gate" of the Heichal, the southern ...


2

How can we reconcile Ezra 3:2-3 & Nehemiah 8:17 ? We can't. Reconciliation presupposes discord. But if no disagreement exists, then reconciliation is impossible. The two passages describe the same event. Indeed, Ezra's second chapter, in its entirety, is almost word for word the same as Nehemiah's seventh chapter, starting with verse six. Then the first ...


2

According to https://biblehub.com/topical/t/talent.htm (v. t.) Among the ancient Greeks, a weight and a denomination of money equal to 60 minae or 6,000 drachmae. The Attic talent, as a weight, was about 57 lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver money, its value was 243 15s. sterling, or about USD1,180. (v. t.) Among the Hebrews, a weight ...


2

Together Daniel being 90+ years old in the 3rd year of Cyrus (~535 BC) according Daniel 10:1, there are other reasons why Daniel didn't return to Jerusalem. Daniel was given high position In the Babylonian empire administration Moreover, at Daniel’s request the king appointed Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego administrators over the province of Babylon, ...


2

@Ctalorgraphics answer is a good one, so I will contribute a little extra to that answer. The important word in Ezra 7:10 is לֵבָב (lebab) which the OP's version translates as "heart". It can mean a variety of things but the idiom is always the inner mind where discipline and will acts. BDB suggests: 4 specific reference to inclinations, ...


2

It is almost certain that there are two different people named "Darius". One of these is well-known historically, and the other is highly debatable. King Darius of Persia, also known as "Darius the Great" (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darius_the_Great) reigned from 522 BC to 486 BC. This is almost certainly the "Darius" ...


2

Ezra 2:63 (and its parallel in Neh 7:65) says: The governor ordered them not to eat the most holy things until there was a priest to consult the Urim and Thummim. This can be understood in two ways: It refers to a priest with the Urim and Thummim It refers to a priest of sufficient rank (a descendant of the High Priest) was among the priests. This means ...


2

By Pharisaical tradition[1], none of the holy articles from Solomon's Temple were recovered, which was why the Essenes considered the second temple illegitimate. There was no rod of Aaron, no Ark, etc. Also according to Nehemiah 7.64-65, the Urimm and Thummim were not available when the second temple was being built. These sought their registration among ...


2

Aramaic Bible in Plain English Ezra 6:11 And the law is set before me, that every man who will change this word, wood shall be torn out from his house and they shall make for him a cross and they shall crucify him upon it, and his house will be given for plunder because of this. Barnes agrees with the above translation: Being set up, let him be hanged ...


1

I think the answer is much more simple. Read the beginning of the narrative: Nehemiah 7:5b “… I found the genealogical record of those who had been the first to return. This is what I found written there: …” Nehemiah is not making a ‘thus sayeth the Lord’ count. He is reading from a document he found. He makes no claims or confirmations of what he ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible