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I believe Paul is teaching that in this new covenant all matters are fulfilled (completed not abolished) spiritually. There is therefore no physical temple & no point to Christ offering physical sacrifices as the sacrifices in this new covenant are now spiritual. The support for a spiritual vs physical temple is found in: Revelation 21:22 I did not ...


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“Faith-based salvation” and “works-based salvation” are not Biblical terms—the text rather speaks of salvation. I believe it is not Biblical authors but Biblical readers who pit faith vs. obedience, Paul vs. James, the God of the OT vs. the God of the NT, etc. The rites God expected of His people were different in Ezekiel’s day than several centuries later (...


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Behold, his soul which is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith. [Habakkuk 2:4 KJV] And he [Abraham] believed in the LORD; and he counted it to him for righteousness. [Genesis 15:6 KJV] It is perfectly clear from the above two texts (and many more like them), both of which are quoted by the New Testament writers, that it ...


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The difference between earning salvation, and qualifying for salvation When the Apostles taught that salvation is by faith, not of works, they meant that grace comes by trust in the work of Christ on the cross, granting us space for repentance, and for bettering ourselves, and escaping hell, by providing us forgiveness - not by the 'gathering up' of grace ...


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Yes. At this time, both Israel and Judah were under Law. ‘Under’ the Mosaic covenant. This was the agreement their ‘fathers’ had put them under. It was not until Jesus provided a way out from under that covenant that they could ‘escape’ the consequences laid out in Deuteronomy 28. And, yes, that covenant was a works based covenant. Simple - “do good, get ...


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The Tanakh contrasts statutes and judgments that if an Israelite does “...he shall live by1 them,”2 with statutes and judgments that if he does he “shall not live by3 them.”4 In Ezekiel, where both phrases occur, Yahveh’s statutes in the Law were those which the Israelites would “live by.”5 On the other hand, the statutes and judgments of the rebellious ...


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I think it means Phoenician Tyre would be permanently done for. And sure enough, Alexander devastated and replaced Phoenician Tyre. See link below on how, "Regarding Phoenician Tyre (i.e. the city prophesied against): The empire was erased. The structures were left in waste. The people were replaced." https://beliefmap.org/prophecy-fulfilled/tyre/...


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You can't lose what you don't have. This question assumes that the Christian concept of "salvation" is something that existed in Ezekiel's time. The Hebrew words usually translated as "salvation" can mean deliverance, rescue, safety, welfare, or victory, and do not have anything to do with the later Christian (or modern Jewish) use of the ...


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Abraham believed God and there was evaluated to him unto righteousness. This statement is repeated five times in the Greek scriptures. (I include LXX as one of the times.) 'Accounted' says the KJV and others but the verb is deponent and has no subject and no direct object and relates to the word logion whose meaning Paul demonstrates in regard to coinage. ...


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Since all men die, the "death" and "deliverance" that Ezekiel is discussing must refer to the man's eternal salvation. This passage in Eze 33 is one of many passages in the Scripture that show how one's eternal salvation can be rejected. Here is a sample: King Saul who was a statesman and prophet called by God (1 Sam 10:11, 12, 19:24), ...


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Ezekiel 8:6 New International Version And he said to me, "Son of man, do you see what they are doing--the utterly detestable things the Israelites are doing here, things that will drive me far from my sanctuary? But you will see things that are even more detestable." to drive Me far לְרָֽחֳקָה֙ (lə·rā·ḥo·qāh) Preposition-l | Verb - Qal - ...


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We must treat cautiously here as the words for "spirit" and "breath" are identical in both Greek and Hebrew. This even persists into modern languages with words like "expired" (= breathed out" meaning "dead". For example, Gen 49:33 - When Jacob had finished giving instructions to his sons, he drew his feet up ...


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No. The spirit can not leave the body ‘miraculously’. It only leaves in, or as as a result of death. Although dying and coming back to life would be miraculous - so in a sense - yes! But your Q asked whether the spirit could leave without causing death, so that’s why the answer is No. The word clearly answers this! - JAMES 2:26 For as the body apart from the ...


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