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12

Frankly, I also searched for but couldn’t find much of others addressing the parallels of Ruth and Elisha. Walfish was almost always the writer. What I did find were mostly studies of one book that had cross references to the other(s) (e.g. Ruth noting a Kings book or vice versa). For some other material I found, see the comment at the bottom of this ...


11

Before anything, though, I must say that no, king Joash would not know that he must strike the ground five or six times. But, he really should have did that. All verse emphasis mine. First of all, we would have to look at the reason why Elisha would be angry at an answer to a seemingly minuscule command, 2 Kings 13:14 (NKJV) 14 Elisha had become sick with ...


5

To clarify the wording of 2 Kings 3:27, although the King James Bible translates this passage as 'indignation, the more common translation is either 'wrath' or 'anger'. For example: 2 Kings 3:27 (NAB): So he took his first-born, his heir apparent, and offered him as a holocaust upon the wall. The wrath against Israel was so great that they gave up the ...


5

Oxen were very expensive in biblical times. Few farmers owned even a single team of them. In ancient documents from elsewhere in the Near East, there are records of farmers renting them from wealthy owners or even government officials. My assumption that that Elisha owns both the oxen and the land is that he's in charge of the whole team of and yet he's ...


5

There’s a lot more to the Elisha case than meets the eye. First, they weren’t children in the sense we think of children. There was no classification of ‘teenagers’ way back then. The youths who ganged up against this solitary man were a mob. Forty-two of them at the least. They came from the town that was the royal cult centre of the northern kings, in ...


4

I found some interesting conenctions between the two: Both Ruth and Elisha are forceful and determined. Ruth "clung" to Naomi ("At this they wept aloud again. Then Orpah kissed her mother-in-law goodbye, but Ruth clung to her". Ruth 1:14, NIV) and is determined to go with her ("When Naomi realized that Ruth was determined to go with her, she stopped urging ...


3

This is a case of ketiv and qere. The ketiv (written text) has לא which is usually a particle of negation: לך אמר לא חיה תחיה Go say, "You will surely not live." The qere (read version) corrects this to its homophone לו which means "to him": לֵ֥ךְ אֱמָר־ל֖וֹ חָיֹ֣ה תִֽחְיֶ֑ה Go say to him, "You will surely live." This isn't ...


3

The "king" referenced in 2 Kings 6 is very unlikely to have been Ahab but rather his son, Joram, for the following reasons. Ahab had been killed in battle at Ramoth Gilead 1 Kings 22:34-37. The prophet Elijah continued to serve God and prophesy during the reign of Ahab's son Ahaziah, 1 Kings 22:41, 2 Kings 1:1-17 Ahaziah died and was succeeded by Joram, 2 ...


3

The background to this event is interesting The woman is described as a wealthy married woman in the village of Shunem. She had no child. This woman got permission from her husband to set up a guest room for Elisha, acknowledging Elisha as a true prophet and holy man of God. Elisha often passed that way in his travels, and he stayed in the guest room. ...


3

The Idea in Brief The Latin Vulgate appears to qualify and amplify the ambiguous meaning of the Masoretic Text. That is, Elijah gives his blessing for Elisha to return home to bid his family and friends good-bye because of the anointing by Elijah. Thus the Latin Vulgate adds "and return" (i.e., to me, Elijah). The basis for the Latin Vulgate reading may ...


3

We might consider that some of the details in the account are vague and might, if considered in-depth, change our perspective. We do not know how old these youths were; they may have been into their late teens. Such might change the perspective from simple childish banter to more harmful teenage threats. Second, it is not the case that any died, which is odd ...


2

The staff was a symbol of authority. Moses lifted his up and the great water parted, Moses hit the rock with it and water gushed out of an actual rock. The prophet's staff was a symbol of the authority of God that was with him and working through him. Elisha sending his staff, was like Elisha sending himself to be there. (similar to Paul sending cloths ...


2

I don't think that Elisha set out to 'teach Joash a lesson' through the striking of the arrows. Rather, the way that Joash responded to Elisha and carried out his instructions revealed that he was rather half-hearted and lacking in belief. Joash, having not followed the Lord's ways and 'done evil in the sight of the Lord', when he heard that Elisha was dying,...


2

2 Kings 13:14-19 reintroduce King Joash after his own death, so at this stage the narrative is thematic rather than chronological. Rachelle Gilmour (Juxtaposition and the Elisha Cycle, pages 199-201) cites DeVries, who believes that 2 Kings 13:14-19 to be a later addition to this narrative. Gilmour says this episode was probably juxtaposed with 2 Kings 8:7-...


2

and he [Elisha] forsaketh the oxen, and runneth after Elijah, and saith, 'Let me give a kiss, I pray thee, to my father and to my mother, and I go after thee.' And he saith to him, 'Go, turn back, for what have I done to thee?' - 1 Kings 19:20, YLT He left the oxen, ran after Elijah, and said, "Please let me kiss my father and mother goodbye, then I ...


2

I see it as grief induced. She had prayed for a son and been granted one, only to lose him. She may have felt that she would have preferred never to have had her child than to have had him and watch him die.


2

Great question. Though i am no expert in the field i am pretty sure that your first interpretation is the correct one. For this i have got two convincing reasons. First, i don't see how the term הך can refer to "shoot" as per your second interpretation. As far as my Hebrew knowledge extends, the word הך is never used to denote shooting only "beating". ...


2

The prophecy by Elisha (2 Kings 3) contained the following predictions: V17 - For the LORD says, ‘You will not see wind or rain, but the valley will be filled with water, and you will drink—you and your cattle and your animals.’ V18b - He will also deliver the Moabites into your hand. V19a - And you shall attack every fortified city and every city of ...


2

The phrase "As the Lord lives" occurs seven times in 1 Kings and seven times in 2 Kings. Seven is the number of divine completion. 2 Kings 5:14 So he went down and dipped himself in the Jordan seven times, as the man of God had told him, and his flesh was restored and became clean like that of a young boy. Seven is a signature of a divine act of ...


2

There are often many details missing in Bible stories. We don’t know how many young people came out to mock Elisha. We don’t know everything they were saying and what their ultimate intent was. We also don’t know what Elisha said in his curse upon them. We also don’t know how many, if any, were actually killed. What we do know is that 42 were mauled and they ...


1

All these answers are good. I'd like to add another point: Calling him "bald-head". Scripture implies, especially when we read I Corinthians 11, that hair is indicative of authority. Notice this takes place immediately after Elisha takes up Elijah's mantle. I would suggest that by calling him "bald" these young men were calling Elisha a fraud, an imposter ...


1

Several versions disagree about who spoke 2 Kings 6:33. Here is a sample: NIV: the messenger came down to him. The king said, "This disaster is from the LORD ESV: the messenger came down to him and said, “This trouble is from the LORD! BSB: the messenger came down to him. And the king said, “This calamity is from the LORD NASB: the messenger came ...


1

Ahab was “the murderer” of the time. Poor or mistranslation is what’s causing this confusion. Looking at the same verse from 27 Bibles 2-Kings-6-32-from-27-Bibles one word causes a huge difference. Most Bibles have the very vague, confusing “a” murderer, which could represent numerous murderers and is terrible for identification. Very few Bibles have the ...


1

This is a generational hatred. Before Joram became king, there was another famine and another prophet in 1 Kings 18 1 After a long time, in the third year, the word of the Lord came to Elijah: “Go and present yourself to Ahab, and I will send rain on the land.” 2So Elijah went to present himself to Ahab. Now the famine was severe in Samaria, 3and Ahab had ...


1

The King was wicked and didn't want to repent and follow God with his whole heart.He kept blaming the prophet since he was an easier target.The famine wouldn't have happened if he had obeyed God(we are all called to be obedient to God and His Messiah). "Joram son of Ahab became king of Israel in Samaria in the eighteenth year of Jehoshaphat king of Judah, ...


1

In the Septuagint, 2 Kings 3:27 is translated literally as follows (using English word order): "And he took his first-born son, whom he gave reign instead of him, and offered him as a whole burnt (offering) upon the wall. And it came to pass a great repentance in Israel. And they departed from him, and returned to the land." However, the Hebrew and Syriac ...


1

Well one thing i would add that in all this look at Aaron Leviticus 8:12 And he poured of the anointing oil upon Aaron's head, and anointed him, to sanctify him.Numbers 3:3 These are the names of the sons of Aaron, the priests which were anointed, whom he consecrated to minister in the priest's office.Luke 4:18 The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he ...


1

The text says that they "...found a wild vine, and gathered from it a lapful of wild gourds, and came and sliced them into the pot of stew, though they did not know what they were." Whatever their schooling (though I'm not sure how someone is "schooled" to be given a gift & calling by God; that's His sovereign work, not man's effort), they simply lacked ...


1

Along with the answer of Enegue, and the comments of Bach, I should add a linguistic particular regarding the occurrences of the conceptual root we've discuss here (בקע). Often, in the MT, we found expressed a particular concept by different graphical roots (someone speaks about them as 'allomorphic roots'). In this case, the same basic concept included in ...


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