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9

NLT translation philosophy is the following (quote from NLT Bible Introduction, emphases mine): The translators of the New Living Translation set out to render the message of the original texts of Scripture into clear, contemporary English. As they did so, they kept the concerns of both formal-equivalence and dynamic-equivalence in mind. On the one hand, ...


6

Another answer gave evidence in support of the idea that this passage refers to demonic powers and echoes (or rather, anticipates) gnostic ideas. Clearly this is one widely held scholarly viewpoint. I would like to point out, however, that this is not the only available, defensible interpretation. I have bolded here the references given by the OP to other NT ...


5

Mark 1:34 explains this … and He did not allow the demons to speak, because they knew Him. Jesus did not need or want the testimony of demons. I wouldn't either. He would have enough of the Pharisees accusing him of being in league with the devil in a short while. The reason given is that the demons "knew him". This is not a testimony of faith or ...


5

In the former, I gather from his line of reasoning that demons cannot be cast out by Satan; in the latter, it seems as though casting out demons by Satan must be a possibility. I think you are mistaking Jesus' reasoning. As you point out that reading would put Jesus at odds with himself in Matthew 7 where he speaks of the 'appearance' of good deeds without ...


4

It would seem that the most simple interpretation is this: When an evil spirit is cast out, you MUST replace it with The Good Spirit [Christ - the strong man who kicks out the Devil]. Failure to do so will result in more evil filling the empty space, because that's just what the human heart gravitates towards, and demonic forces are happy to oblige. The ...


4

Jude 1:8-13 (DRB) In like manner these men also defile the flesh, and despise dominion, and blaspheme majesty. 9 When Michael the archangel, disputing with the devil, contended about the body of Moses, he durst not bring against him the judgment of railing speech, but said: The Lord command thee. 10 But these men blaspheme whatever things they know not: and ...


4

To answer the main question, no - there is nothing in Luke 11 which implies that others drive out demons by "the finger of God". To understand Jesus' words here it's beneficial to have some context around exorcism in the ancient world, and we will explore this below. There is an implication that the Pharisees accuse Jesus of having spiritual power ...


4

Fervent prayer can build up faith. Fasting is a form of self-denial, training in self-discipline and righteousness. Ninevites showed their repentance by national fasting. Fasting provides a favorable condition for faith to develop. Jonah 3:5 The Ninevites believed God. A fast was proclaimed, and all of them, from the greatest to the least, put on sackcloth. ...


4

[During his life] was Judas [labeled] a "Christian" ( Χριστιανούς )? - No. Although Judas was listed as a disciple of Jesus in Luke 6:16, Judas would not have been labeled "Christian" since he was not alive to attend the church at Antioch - based on Acts 1:16-19. Acts 11:26 The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch.


3

The context and sense of the question mean that Jesus was asking for a name, rather than a title, although in some sense he was answered with a title. This is the only occasion in Mark's Gospel when Jesus does ask a supplicant for his name, yet we are not told the demoniac's name, only the response of the demons, who say 'Legion' because they are many. There ...


3

The historical view doesn't tie with the parallel in Matthew: "So shall it be with this generation." Jesus was casting the demon out of Judah and would send His Spirit to replace it, to occupy the house, to "fill it up." Those who rejected Pentecost would be filled with seven worse demons (perhaps the ones cast out of Mary?) which is why 1) the Jewish rulers ...


3

Why did Michael wait 21 days to come to help the angel that was sent to Daniel? Perhaps God was testing the angel to see if he would turn to the dark side. 12 Then he continued, “Do not be afraid, Daniel." This applied to the angel as well. If he were afraid, how could he convince Daniel not to be? Why didn't Michael intervene right away? God hadn't ...


3

In Job, God authorizes Satan to do everything except take Job's life. This was not a general authorization to do whatever he wants to whomever he wants whenever he wants, but relates specifically to the testing of Job. There are other similar authorizations that are limited for specific purposes and events: Rev 7.2-3:  'And I saw another angel ascending ⌊...


3

The verb translated "test" here in 1 John 4:1, δοκιμάζω, is used by Paul often in a very similar sense of: to test, examine, prove, scrutinize; 2. to recognize as genuine after examination, to approve, deem worthy [Thayer] Here is a sample of how this word is used: Rom 12:2 - Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the ...


2

An army would not go around re-building castles broken down by comrades. That army would fall. Casting out devils (for real), including healing of mind and body, is like rebuilding a castle wall that took very hard work to destroy. Jesus assumes that the Devil spends a lot of effort in possessing a soul. Sure if it was an 'easy thing' to re-posses another ...


2

Earl Doherty says, in The Jesus Puzzle, there has not been a universal scholarly consensus on what Paul has in mind when referring to 'rulers' (archons) in 1 Corinthians 2:8, but that over the last century a majority of commentators, some reluctantly, have decided that he is referring to the demon spirits. He cites Paul Ellingworth, S. G. F. Brandon, C. K. ...


2

This is the text of an answer I posted to a similar question on Christianity SE: From the perspective of the Greek New Testament, demon could be said to represent δαίμων (daimōn, from which the corresponding English word is derived) and devil could be said to represent διάβολος (diabolos; viz. "diabolical"). A variant of the word δαίμων - δαιμόνιον (...


2

Demons, whether good or bad but usually bad, existed in many ancient cultures.The Jewish writings of the Apocalyptic period did expand on the notion of demons, with the Book of Enoch introducing the Watcher angels. The Hebrew word that came to mean 'demons' (shedim) occurs in Deuteronomy 32:17 and Psalm 106:37, but only as false gods to whom sacrifices were ...


2

Every lexicon I consulted has basically the same meaning for δαιμονίζομαι (daimonizomai): Thayer: to be under the power of a demon Souter: I am under the power of an evil spirit or demon NIV: I am possessed by a demon Newman: be demon possessed BDAG: be possessed by a hostile spirit Vine: to be possessed by a demon, to act under the control of a demon ...


2

To get the impact/context of what the Apostle John is talking about we need to start with verse 1.Evidently false teachers who were harassing the churches with doctrines characteristic of the Gnostic heresy. So when John says to "test the spirits" he is referring to people claiming to get their message from a supernatural source. Christians need to realize ...


2

The origin is of Hewbrew / Judaism mysticism. Some suppose it to be from the Midrash and Talmud oral traditions passed down from the 3rd - 1st century BC, and then later picked up and reprinted as the Book of Enoch. From Chabad.org, "Nephilim: Fallen Angels, Giants, or Men?" "The Midrash3 relates that when the generation of the Flood went astray, G‑d ...


2

In this parable, Jesus pictures the consequences of moral, ethical and religious reformation apart from a righteous relationship with Him. The main character in this illustration is an unclean spirit. Unclean of course represents the wicked, vile nature of all demon spirits; but this particular spirit was not as evil as he could have been because later ...


2

In some instances ἔλεγεν and other verbs in the form of imperfect do not really convey a past continuous sense, but a sense of an instance and a singularity of action, like aorist. Here is a salient example: Mark 9:24. “Immediately the father of the boy cried out and said (ἔλεγεν), “I believe; help my unbelief!”, here ἕλεγεν simply cannot have a notion of ...


2

I will not defend any particular version so I do not know what any given translation committee was thinking when they made their numerous decisions. What we do know is the following: The underlying Greek text is undisputed. The word here is ἀρχή (arché) and occurs about 56 times in the NT. In most cases it simply means "beginning" or very similar. ...


2

Simple answer - they don’t. Jesus did not say that the reason these disciples could not cast this demon out was because they didn’t have faith but rather because they had unbelief. Demons are not driven out via prayer and fasting This story recorded in Matthew and Mark has been traditionally misinterpreted namely to ‘fit personal doctrine/theology’. Let’s ...


2

In γένος all demons, their entire universe is implied, as the traditional interpretation has it. For instance, if I see a tennis player blaming everybody and everything except for himself for having lost a match, I can say: "This tribe always finds fault in others, not in themselves", I will mean in "this tribe" all tennis players without ...


2

The word ἄβυσσος (abyssos) only occurs twice (Luke 8:31, Rom 10:7) in the NT outside of the book of Revelation where it occurs another seven times, see Rev 9:1, 2, 11, 11:7, 17:8, 20:1, 3. Its meaning in the NT is given by BDAG as: a transcendent place associated with the dead and hostile powers, netherworld, abyss. In the NT it is the place from the ...


2

What is the “abyss” in Luke 8:31? What is the “abyss” that Legion was imploring Jesus not to command them to go away into in Luke 8:31? Strong's Concordance abussos: boundless, bottomless Original Word: ἄβυσσος, ου, ἡ Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine Transliteration: abussos Phonetic Spelling: (ab'-us-sos) Definition: boundless, bottomless Usage: the abyss, ...


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