New answers tagged

0

What is the hermeneutical interpretation of "dying with Christ" (2 Tim. 2:11)? Paul's words to his faithful companion Timothy refer to the physical death and that they will reign with him in the future, the promised reward, is assured as long as they remain faithful to the end. PHYSICAL DEATH 2 Timothy 2:11-12 NASB 11 The statement is trustworthy: ...


2

In the verse “if we died with Him, we will also live with Him,” the words “with Him” are key. We can only live with Christ if we are united with him in his death. In dying for us, Christ received the wages that were due to us because of sin (Rom 6:23). It is by his death that we are reconciled to God (Eph 1:7, Rom 3:24) and through his death that we have ...


3

In understanding this important legal principle, we must recall that the Hebrew verbs are quite different: In Ex 20:13 we have רָצַח (ratsach) is an illegal killing, ie, murder. In Ex 21:12, 22:19, Lev 20:10, we have מוּת (muth), ie, a killing of any description. Note that the 6th commandment does NOT outlaw killing generally, else no army could go to war. ...


1

I’m not sure which ‘lens’ you are wearing with this observation. Nevertheless, the ‘view’ needs to be kept in the correct perspective - so let’s analyse this perspective. The ‘Death Penalty’ verses you quoted, all of them, are all related to the Law. There was only one penalty for ‘breaking’ the Law - death. The ‘wages’ of ‘sin’, when judged by the Law, is ...


0

No, that would contradict other parts of the Bible that promise resurrection or afterlife. Christ himself was rose from the dead. Colossians 1:18 (NASB, emphasis added) He is also the head of the body, the church; and He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that He Himself will come to have first place in everything. Meaning, from here on ...


Top 50 recent answers are included