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25

This is about ritual purity, not moral purity. According to Leviticus 15:19-30, a woman is unclean during her monthly period, until 7 days have passed. It may be as simple as she had been on her period, but the time had passed so that David would not be unclean if he had relations with her. Leviticus 15:1924,28-30 NIV 19 “‘When a woman has her regular ...


22

The question is a good one, and worth discussing. My own sense is that it includes a mis-step, however, which casts a different light on things. My short answer to the question posed ("how does 'foot washing' lead to the act of 'sexual intercourse'?") is: it doesn't! First, though, to pick up a point made in a comment to the question. "Feet" as a euphemism ...


15

Reading this passage today made me want to research it. Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath, and He came to fulfill the law not break it. This passage has several aspects that are best read together as Jesus combines them: Jesus and Disciples Pluck and Eat Grains on the Sabbath At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath. And His disciples ...


12

Looking at the texts of Deuteronomy 24 and Jeremiah 3, I'd suggest the key aspect of these verses are divorce: "...her first husband, who divorced her, is not allowed to marry her again after she has been defiled" (Dt 24:4) "If a man divorces his wife and she leaves him and marries another man, should he return to her again? Would not the ...


11

Interacting with Frank Luke's response, I like the theory proposed by E.W. Bullinger, however it does not seem to fit with what immediately follows in Chapter 18. First of all I believe that Bullinger is correct in his analysis of the construction of the passage. I agree that the intent is to contrast the Spirit coming upon David and leaving Saul, and ...


11

Not a Hyperbolic Expression The Text of Psalm 51:4: לְךָ לְבַדְּךָ ׀ חָטָאתִי וְהָרַע בְּעֵינֶיךָ עָשִׂיתִי לְמַעַן תִּצְדַּק בְּדָבְרֶךָ תִּזְכֶּה בְשָׁפְטֶֽךָ׃ Explanation 1) "Against you alone" (לְךָ לְבַדְּךָ): This is a prayer of David for repentance (a penitential psalm), and while he sinned against many others in the affair with Bathsheba, ...


9

Excellent question. Let's explore some explanations. 1) The first explanation is simply that they were indeed unlawful priests (c.f. Judges 17). 2) That the text would mention this transgression without consequence seems strange to many commentators who propose a second explanation - that the word "priest" here means "advisor". Let's examine a textual ...


9

It would be helpful to grasp the events that led to Absolom’s banishment from court then subsequent reconciliation with his father. These events are recorded in 2 Samuel 13 and 14. Absolom returned to Hebron, where David was first proclaimed King and where Absolom was born. The NIV Study Bible makes this comment: Absolom may have had reason to believe ...


8

A supplement to Mark Edward's answer: Though "strength" and "praise" are two very different words, the "strength" in Ps 8 in the Hebrew text comes from "mouths", and the psalm is about praising God. It is not a stretch to think that the psalm talks about praise from the infants' mouths. Moreover, the New Testament seldom quotes the Old Testament word for ...


7

Unlike what some consider to a blatant mistake, the argument from David and the Showbread works to show the identity of Jesus as the Lord of the Sabbath who is also the Son of God. The original narrative (1 Samuel 21:1-9) includes David, the High Priest Ahimelech, 12 loaves of week old showbread, and Doeg the Edomite. David’s men are discussed but not ...


7

For the phrase in question, the Hebrew text states וְהִיא מִתְקַדֶּשֶׁת מִטֻּמְאָתָהּ (vehiy mitkaddeshet mitumʿatah). To note, the Hebrew text lacks the conjunction כִּי (ki); therefore, translating this Hebrew phrase into English with an initial “for” is untenable. Since there is no “for,” the author is not providing the reason that David laid with her. ...


7

The answer can be gleaned from other places in the Bible where King David and his sin is spoken of. Paul writes in Romans 4:5-8: “But to him that worketh not, but believeth on him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness. Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works, ...


7

I will offer a response to this question two ways: Assuming David was forgiven Considering the possibility that David was not forgiven Assuming David was forgiven The Lord’s words to Samuel put it very well: the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart (1 Samuel 16:7). Two individuals may ...


7

1 John 1:9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness. If this is true, it follows that Judas did not confess his sins before God. David wrote Psalm 32: Then I acknowledged my sin to you and did not cover up my iniquity. I said, "I will confess my transgressions to the LORD.&...


6

The short answer is: No, it was not the norm to kill men and women and children in war. The standard practice in ancient warfare was to offer peace when besieging a city, of course the peace terms were conditioned on complete surrender of the inhabitants and by reducing it to a vassal kingdom. If they didn't accept complete surrender, the male population ...


6

Ruddy, in this instance, refers to David's complexion. The word means having a healthy reddish colour usually from leading an outdoor life. David was a shepherd and so his complexion had a healthy, weather-beaten look. Some Bible translations say his skin was dark. Ruddy does not necessarily mean that David had red hair, or that he was prone to blushing.


6

Scripture comments after Michal despised David for his exuberance at the bringing in of the ark (2 Samuel 6:20-23) : Therefore Michal the daughter of Saul had no child unto the day of her death. [2 Samuel 6:23 KJV] Scripture does not say that Michal was barren. Only that 'therefore', that is to say as a result of her attitude and words, she had no child. ...


5

I think that the argument could be stated very simply: Jesus is in effect stating that, "You are trying to lambast us for a perceived infraction (rabbinic law), but one of your heros actually broke the mosaic law without it reducing your opinion of him."


5

In Hebrew, ל as a prefix can mean "to" in the sense of "I am walking to the park." But it can also be used to make a noun the indirect object (i.e. beneficiary) of a sentence, in the sense of "I gave the cookie to David" or "I opened the door for David." By attaching ל to a noun, we can make it the indirect object of a sentence. (If we want to do this in ...


5

This is a great question. Most commentators suggest that Nahash had most likely offered him some assistance and security during the time of his flight from Saul. After all, Moab and Philistine (see 1 Sam. 21 and 22) were eager to extend their protection to David (not out of compassion but because Saul was their common enemy), so it is not far fetched that ...


5

1 Kings 19:2 So Jezebel sent a messenger to Elijah to say, "May the gods deal with me, be it ever so severely, if by this time tomorrow I do not make your life like that of one of them." If Jonathan had been possessed by the spirit of Jezebel as claimed by Pastor Morris, he would have easily killed David like Joab killed Asahel in 2 Samuel 20:9 ...


5

God sent Nathan to David to expose his sin and pronounce God’s judgment upon him: “Now therefore the sword shall never depart from thine house; because thou hast despised me, and hast taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be thy wife. Thus saith the LORD, Behold, I will raise up evil against thee out of thine own house, and I will take thy wives before ...


5

In verse 20 there's no doubt David references angels. The word used is מַלְאָךְ / mal'āḵ. Even though the word is sometimes applied to human beings (Mal. 2:7, Rev. 1:20), it's indeed more commonly applied to spiritual beings. Yet that's not the case in verse 21. Even though some translations use "angels" in verse 21 (NLT, NASB), most of the other ...


5

This is a very interesting question - and I don’t have a ready answer. Nevertheless there are some aspects which are worth consideration. JOHN 17:12 While I was with them in the world, I kept them in Your name. Those whom You gave Me I have kept; and none of them is lost except the son of perdition [snip -emphasis mine] Only two persons are labelled ‘son of ...


5

You appear to be well researched regarding this issue. And there is a plethora of content online expounding every angle, every viewpoint. I doubt you’ll come across something ‘new’ on this forum - more likely a rehash of what you’ve already encountered - and put aside? Nevertheless- Let’s highlight some points for consideration. You say “The biological ...


4

First, remember that David was king, and as king he answered to no one but G-d. He could have ordered Uriah killed on whatever pretext and then taken Bat-Sheva. He had that authority. Instead, what he did was rely on the fact that Jewish soldiers going into battle are required to give their wives conditional retroactive divorce papers which in effect say: ...


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