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1 vote

Does the book of Job describe a Dragon?

Leviathan - liv-ya-tan - is the Hebrew version of Litan, which is a Canaanite god that was an enemy of Baal. It was not a physical thing like a dragon. In the old testament, Leviathan appears in ...
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0 votes

Does the book of Job describe a Dragon?

Why would God's response of his greatness and wisdom be describing a mythological creature. No whatever creature he was describing is real.
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1 vote

According to the text, are the trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil symbolic or actual trees?

According to the text, the trees seem to be actual… though “the text” might vary according to your preferred translation. If we drop the religious baggage, ignore how trees being “pleasant to the ...
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0 votes

Does Genesis 1:29-31 leave any room for the existence of animal-based diets in the period between the Creation and the Fall?

A legal maxim: "that which is not forbidden is allowed." But this begs many questions, for no moral commandments were given in Eden, yet no one would argue that murder or adultery was ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Genesis 2:24 When does a man leave his father and mother?

The translation is very misleading. The Massoretic text (MT) is: על כן יעזב איש את אביו ואת אמו ודבק באשתו והיו לבשר אחד The first to words על כן mean "For that (reason)" or "That's ...
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1 vote

Isaiah 27:1 Why does the Leviathan need to be punished?

When the Bible just mentions "Leviathan" without any definition -- like the mention of "stork", etc -- then it assumes the reader knows what is being referred to. So we should look ...
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0 votes

What was the logic behind changing "firmament" to "sky"?

Because since it was written we’ve invented telescopes, and have sent satellites and humans up into space, and we know there’s no solid firmament up there, as the writers of Genesis apparently thought....
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-1 votes

Isaiah 27:1 Why does the Leviathan need to be punished?

Isaiah has a different viewpoint from Job. Also from Genesis 1.21, where the sea monsters are described as a "good" creation of God. Similarly, Ps. 104 presents Leviathan as God's creation: &...
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0 votes

According to the text, are the trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil symbolic or actual trees?

The OP asks "according to the text," but the text doesn't say explicitly whether the trees are literal or symbolic. Gen. 1 clearly describes literal trees, however, so we can at least deduce ...
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-1 votes

Is Revelation 3:14 saying that Christ was created by God?

I read and read and don't believe it. The doctrine of two Creators and two Gods. Jehovah - the Creator Jesus - the Creator Jehovah - God Jesus - God It's not even the doctrine of the Triune Creator ...
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0 votes

Why is the placing of man in Eden mentioned twice? Gen 2.8 and Gen 2.15

The man was placed in the garden the Lord God specifically planted in the east, in Eden. Adam had been formed from the dust of the earth somewhere else. He had not been formed out of the dust in ...
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0 votes

Why is the placing of man in Eden mentioned twice? Gen 2.8 and Gen 2.15

Background After reading the entire narrative, the first statement may be seen as a summary of the entire passage: And the LORD God planted a garden in Eden, in the east, and there he put the man ...
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4 votes

Why is the placing of man in Eden mentioned twice? Gen 2.8 and Gen 2.15

At the outset, though this might not appear relevant, is the intrigue of there being two accounts of Creation in Genesis. There is the "Elohim" account from verse one through to ch.2 vs.3 ...
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2 votes

According to the text, are the trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil symbolic or actual trees?

And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and ...
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0 votes

What does "image" in Genesis 1:26-27 mean?

Everything in nature reveals some attribute of God, from how plants grow, to sex, to the stars in the sky, to how clouds form, how wind blows, etc. There are many scriptures, but here are a few: ...
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-1 votes

According to the text, are the trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil symbolic or actual trees?

I believe that the Bible clearly shows that the two trees are real trees with special properties, which also serve special symbolic purposes. The garden of Eden is the earthly counterpart to God's ...
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1 vote

Was it the first time that Eve saw the tree of good and evil in Genesis 3:7

What do we believe in Bible? We believe God is justice. For sure! If you can find a punishment of sin in Bible that God hadn't given a previous warning, please leave a comment, and we take a look at ...
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1 vote

Revelation 21:5 - “Behold, I am making all things new?”

It is a renewal not a throwing away of the old and replacing it with something with no connection to what has been thrown away. However it should be viewed in the same sense as we get new, glorified ...
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0 votes

Does Colossians 1:16 represent the creation of a sub-set of things within the universe?

I think one ought not skip over the conjunction whether “whether they be” in other words even these things are created and he enumerates them. These are not excluded, they are not eternally ...
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1 vote

Does Colossians 1:16 represent the creation of a sub-set of things within the universe?

If I say that US Open tournament sponsors paid and provided all things within the precincts of the area of the tournament both in-courts and outside courts, it does not mean that the courts themselves ...
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3 votes

Does Colossians 1:16 represent the creation of a sub-set of things within the universe?

Paul is very fond of using the "hendiadys" = two extremes to signify the whole. In Col 1:16 we have heaven and earth (ie everything) visible and invisible (ie everything) thrones, ...
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1 vote

Revelation 21:5 - “Behold, I am making all things new?”

"Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new." - 2 Cor 5:17 KJV "For I will be merciful to their ...
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2 votes

Revelation 21:5 - “Behold, I am making all things new?”

Everything in the NT is the fulfillment (ala Sensus Plenior) of something in the OT. The only safe way to interpret any passage in the NT is by locating what it is intended to fulfil from the OT. In ...
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3 votes

Revelation 21:5 - “Behold, I am making all things new?”

Grammatically, the phrase: καινὰ ποιῶ πάντα (= new I make all) could be translated as any of the following: I make all new things (ie, start all over again) I make all things new [again] Before ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Is Paul making the "watchmaker argument" in Romans 1:18-25?

Yes, Paul is making a teleological argument here, but it functions somewhat differently from modern watch-maker arguments. Paul is writing at a time when nearly everyone believed in some supernatural ...
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1 vote

Is Paul making the "watchmaker argument" in Romans 1:18-25?

The short answer is "No", I do not believe Paul is making the Watchmaker argument in Rom 1:18-23, and Rom 2:14-16. Rather, Paul is arguing something similar to what C. S. Lewis argues in ...
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1 vote

Is Paul making the "watchmaker argument" in Romans 1:18-25?

Paul was not making the watchmaker argument per se but he was assuming it for his larger point, as everyone assumed it at that time. Rather, Paul is building up to an argument that everyone must be ...
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