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A covenant of salt in the Bible The term covenant of salt is found three times in the Old Testament: First occurrence Leviticus 2:13 `And every offering of your grain offering you shall season with salt; you shall not allow the salt of the covenant of your God to be lacking from your grain offering. With all your offerings you shall offer salt.'[...


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The Broader Context Answers "Covenant" Grammatically, the singular feminine ἡ πρώτη ἐκείνη ("that first") could match to either the singular feminine λειτουργία ("ministry) or singular feminine διαθήκη ("covenant"). Proximity would argue toward the nearer referent to "covenant," but proximity is not always the ...


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Jesus replaced Moses and Elijah. Luke 9:28 About eight days after Jesus said this, he took Peter, John and James with him and went up onto a mountain to pray. 29As he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became as bright as a flash of lightning. 30Two men, Moses and Elijah, appeared in glorious splendor, talking with Jesus. ... ...


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At the outset, I would like to flag up two biblical principles that form my starting point for answering this important question. (1) Romans 3:20 - “By the deeds of the law shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin.” Whatever answers folks come up with, there surely can be no disputing that striving to keep either all, ...


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The evidence strongly suggests that when New Testament authors refer to scripture, or say "it is written", they are referring to pre-Christian Jewish sacred writings and not what is now the New Testament. The one possible exception is the author of 2 Peter. (I hesitate to say "Hebrew Bible" for three reasons. First, most of them use the Septuagint ...


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Olam The word translated as "forever" can be interpreted "long time, period, duration, farthest reaches of time, age". There does not exist a word in Hebrew that unambiguously means "forever". Moreover the meaning of this word changes over time in Hebrew as we start seeing plural forms, suggesting that olam shifted to mean "...


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When Jesus died. -- From Matthew 27: 50 Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost. 51 And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; Compare to Hebrews 9: 3 And after the second veil, the tabernacle which is called the Holiest of all; ... 7 But into the second went the high priest alone once ...


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There is a similar expression which appears a few times in the gospels, as pointed out by Ellicott's Commentary. That expression is, "Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away." (Mt. 24:35, Mk. 13:31, Lk. 21:33). Jesus makes it clear, repeatedly, that heaven and earth will indeed pass away. I think this sheds some light on Matthew 5:18,...


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I do believe there was a book written about this. The point isn't that the sacrifices were seasoned with salt but instead there was an exchange of salt. Or the way I see it is God provides the salt, from the earth, and we exchange it with Him in an offering. Let's remember this was around 3,000 years ago. Salt was like gold, rare and only for the wealthy. ...


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Jesus confirmed his covenant, the New Covenant, for one week. In the middle of the week (3 ½ years into his ministry) he was “cut off” thus, putting an end to the sacrifices and offerings of the old covenant. The Jews would still continue in vain to offer sacrifices that had been rendered null and void by the crucifixion of Christ for another 40 years until ...


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A bit before in Hebrews 8:10 (NASB) we read For this is the covenant which I will make with the house of Israel After those days, declares the Lord: I will put My laws into their minds, And write them on their hearts. And I will be their God, And they shall be My people. In both of the passages (Heb. 8:10 and Heb. 10:15-16), Jeremiah 31:33-34 (NASB) is ...


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This answer may not fit comfortably with those with a doctrinal philosophical foundation. Neither will it specify the precise ‘Laws’ that are ‘written’ on your heart, you wanted specifically listed - because you can’t. And that’s because that is not what Hebrews 10:16 means. You are seeking an interpretation that can only be supported using eisegesis. ...


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This is clear use of hyperbole. Jesus makes use of similar hyperbole in the sermon on the mount (Matthew 5:21-48) in which he instructs us to cut out our eyes if we even look lustfully at a woman or cut off our hand if we stumble. He doesn't mean this literally, but is using hyperbole to emphasize his point. Likewise, here we have an over-emphasis to drive ...


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What is interesting is that before attending the Last Supper, "Satan entered Judas" (Luke 22:3). Jesus knew that Satan had implanted the betrayal in the heart of Judas (John 13:2), and proceeded to wash the feet of Judas anyway. Then again before the Last Supper ended, "Satan entered Judas" (Jn 13:27). So what is puzzling is why someone who was possessed by ...


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The law clearly states for most of the nations mentioned in Ezra 9 and 10 that the marriage is illegal (compare the law in Deuteronomy 7:3 to Ezra's own description of the transgression in Ezra 9:12). The response in Ezra 10:3 states explicitly that they will break the marriage covenants "by the law". The marriages never had a legal footing, and are ...


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The vows of the psalmist(s) are all voluntary. There is no 'negotiated' agreement between two parties. The person vowing makes a promise and then fulfills the promise. The other party is not contracted into the activity. No such '2-way' agreements exist. God's promises to his people are also personal promises which are then personally fulfilled. (This is how ...


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These verses are a direct reference to the Israelite covenant as referenced below. In Ex 19 Moses is instructed in the Covenant directly by God. Moses then conveys the content of the covenant to the people which is recorded in Ex 20:1-17 as the 10 Commandments, and then explained and amplified in Ex 20:22-23:33. The people answered, three times, “whatever ...


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This is not an answer to the question as stated, but an interpretation of the NT verse: “I will put my laws in their hearts, and I will write them on their minds” (Heb 10:16).  These words do not appear to reference any specific list of commandments or prescribe a new set of laws. Jesus himself said that he did not come to abolish the law or the prophets: “...


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Hebrews 8:13 is "By speaking of a new covenant, He has made the first one obsolete; and what is obsolete and aging will soon disappear." (Berean Study Bible) It is important to clarify what the term 'obsolete' here means. As the lines make clear, the first covenant 'will soon disappear'. This means it still exists. So whatever 'obsolete' here ...


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Obsolete - from the Greek palaioō/palaios. The first covenant, the covenant the Israelites were ‘under’ before Jesus died had problems. Therefore a new one was implemented (after the ‘old’ one had been fulfilled). This is quite clearly expressed here ... HEBREWS 8:6 But as it is, Christ has obtained a ministry that is as much more excellent than the old as ...


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The word, the word obsolete solely means; outdated, out of date. The word is referring to something that has grown old over time. It can mean that something better, newer or more perfected / modern is at hand. The Greek; Ἐν τῷ λέγειν Καινὴν πεπαλαίωκεν τὴν πρώτην τὸ δὲ παλαιούμενον καὶ γηράσκον ἐγγὺς ἀφανισμοῦ. πεπαλαίωκεν - pepalaiōken [pe-palai-ōken], = ...


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At what exact moment did/will the Old Covenant disappear/vanish away? Jesus answered it in Matthew 5:18 For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished.


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"But you must continue in the things which you have learned and been assured of, knowing from whom you have learned them" refers in part to the "new revelation" Paul shared with Timothy, his son in the faith, so no, the OT (Tanakh) was not the only Scripture in Paul's day, and the word Scripture(s) in 2 Timothy 3:16 is not a reference to only the OT ...


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2Wherefore I praised the dead which are already dead more than the living which are yet alive.3Yea, better [is he] than both they, which hath not yet been, who hath not seen the evil work that is done under the sun.(Eccl. 3:2-3) The author(Solomon) is declaring that "better is the one who is dead, than the one who is yet to be born to see the evil". ...


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Abraham, at Gen. 22: 16-17 is promised that his descendants would be blessed with an "exceeding multiplication of his seed like the stars of the heaven and the sand upon the seashore." Previously, at Gen. 13:16, God promised Abraham that his posterity would be as numerous "as the dust of the earth." Rabbi Mendel Weinbach writes about ...


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If you recall, Exodus 6:3 portrays God telling Moses that God had only previously been known as God Almighty (El Shaddai), specifically not as 'the LORD' (Yahweh). However, a cursory glance through Genesis shows that the patriarchs most certainly DID know God by his name, Yahweh (Gen 4:26 and Gen 15:6-8 are just two examples). This discrepancy is merely one ...


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Answer: The Bible states explicitly that the Ten Commandments were written on the tablets of stone. The Ten Commandments stand apart in Exodus 20, but aren't named as such. However, they are clearly referenced later in the book. And he was there with the Lord forty days and forty nights; he did neither eat bread, nor drink water. And he wrote upon ...


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The act of naming was significant in the covenant making process. Adam gave the woman who was created from him, a new name, a tradition that exists today in the form of a wife changing her name when she gets married. There is an implicit covenant between Adam and the animals in the garden, whom he names as well (the covenant there being a microcosm of the ...


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