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Great questions! And let me first say that I want to encourage you to keep reading the way you are reading. You have some great insights. I think some of your insights are in focus in this passage and others are not though. Let's take a look at Paul's flow of thought here and see what we can discover. Broad Literary Context The verses in question are part ...


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This is going to be a very short answer, and by all means I invite others to post more elaborate ones. In short, I think the answer can be found in 1 Cor 9:20-22 (ESV): 20 To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews. To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. 21 ...


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In short, yes, because it was not a different body. Of course, once the Spirit of Christ, was restored to the lifeless, maimed, crucified and buried body - that body was resurrected, but this changed the body not swapped it for a better one. Paul compares this change in a resurrected body with the change between a seed and seedling: Thou fool, that which ...


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Did Jesus’ spirit return to His crucified body? Since you reference the Gospel of John, the answer is "Yes" - based on John 20:25-27. John 20:25-27 [KJV] : "25 The other disciples therefore said unto him, We have seen the Lord. But he said unto them, **Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of ...


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I believe you answered your own question with the scripture you attached with it. And it came to pass, that, while they communed together and reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them. But their eyes were holden that they should not know him. The point was that Christ withheld who He was from them. Most likely for the purpose of seeing if ...


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What James3.1 said, plus: I like to link 1 Corinthians 12:22-25 with 1:26-31, because there are some commonalities in the two passages which go a long way in answering at least some of your questions. Since the Corinthians had a problem with pride and were given to boasting, first about the leaders with whom they most closely identified (namely, Paul, ...


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The implication in my mind is that Judas received the Eucharist. Mark's version of the Last Supper, which is essentially the same as Matthew's. 17 When evening came, Jesus arrived with the Twelve. 18 While they were reclining at the table eating, he said, “Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me—one who is eating with me.” 19 They were saddened, and one ...


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The four evangelists present the four events in a different order: Matthew: Sop, Bread, Wine Mark: Sop, Breadd, Wine Luke: Wine Bread, Sop John: Sop, Judas' departure Notice several things about these accounts: Luke records a different order for taking the bread vs wine John does not record anything about bread and wine Only John records the departure of ...


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The context shows us that becoming one spirit with the Lord Jesus was analogous to becoming one with the spouse and or in some cases, even someone whose not your spouse (as in sexual immorality e.g. prostitution). 1 Corinthians 6:13-17 (ESV) The body is not meant for sexual immorality, but for the Lord, and the Lord for the body. 14 And God raised the Lord ...


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“Which premise (or step) of the argument is flawed” - Step 4, ‘Therefore, Jesus is not a spirit”. Jesus did not say he was not a Spirit. He said, a spirit does not have flesh and bone. And that is absolutely correct, it doesn’t. They don’t. You are making a deduction, but your ‘therefore’, your conclusion fails to consider the whole verse. Look at at that ...


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Valid vs Sound I believe this argument is valid, but it is not sound. (terms defined here) It is valid in that if the premises are true, the conclusion logically follows. However, I suggest that it would be overplaying the evidence to claim that premises 1 & 4 are certain. If the premises are not true, the argument is not sound. Here is an example of a ...


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People are reading far too much significance into this one verse. Look earlier in the chapter, at verses 36 and 37: And as they thus spake, Jesus himself stood in the midst of them, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you. But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit. In verse 39, Jesus is simply trying to remove their ...


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Eph 2:15 having abolished in the flesh the hostility, the law of commandments contained in ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man of the two, making peace. The question shows an immense lack of contextual & theological understanding on your part. The ethnic and gender identities are not hats to be removed and put back on. Paul never ...


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A Biblical Unitarian probably wouldn't make an argument like this, and the reason turns on the meaning of 'spirit' in the relevant passages, which is a word with multiple meanings in both the ancient Greek and ancient Hebrew. This Biblical Unitarian commentary distinguishes 15 different senses of the Greek term 'pneuma' ('spirit' in English). For John 4:24, ...


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"Spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see I have" does not logically mean that He is not a spirit, but that He is not merely a spirit (humans being a body and spirit composite, not only a spirit like angels). This would be a logically fallacy, since no mere spirit has flesh and bones, but no one has claimed that Jesus is a mere spirit, but ...


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Clearly looking at all the verses as a whole there is ‘conflict’ / ‘tension’ between the verses. But the strongest conclusion would be that Jesus was not a Spirit at the time he ascended to heaven. The disciples though they have seen a Ghost – Jesus clearly confirms that he is not a Ghost (spirit) as he has flesh and bones Luke 24:37-39 - 37 They were ...


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The logic is fallacious, for it does not regard the polysemy of the term "spirit" and thus creates a famous fallacy of ambiguity. The Scripture distinguishes uncreated Spirit - God, and created spirits, angels (Hebrews 1:14), demons (Mark 1:27), human souls (for sometimes also human souls are called "spirits" /Hebrews 12:23/). Thus, when ...


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The argument is flawed because it doesn’t take into account how the language is used and the overarching context. Stating “God is spirit”, is correct. But God also lives inside the body of believers “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you? If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy him. For God’s temple is holy,...


1

English Standard Version I cry out to God Most High, to God who fulfills his purpose for me. It is important to point out that the word "purpose" is not in the original Hebrew. New American Standard Bible I will cry to God Most High, To God who accomplishes all things for me. who fulfills גֹּמֵ֥ר (gō·mêr) Verb - Qal - Participle - masculine ...


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In the beggining of that Psalm, we can read in NASB Prayer for Rescue from Persecutors. For the music director; set to Al-tashheth. A Mikhtam of David, when he fled from Saul in the cave. This was a prayer for aid. Why would David need aid? As the beginning also implies, David fled from Saul to a cave (1 Samuel 22:1-2). Given the context, the purpose God ...


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After reading: The question: If Christ is the head of his body, and his body is his bride, then he is his own bride? The Father and the Lamb and the Holy Spirit are actively reversing what happened to us in the first Adam. In the future the Head will be connected to the Body, and in the new Second Adam the Bride. In Rev 21 Then I saw a new heaven and ...


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John 10:30 I and the Father are one. John 17:11 Protect them by the power of your name, the name you gave me, so that they may be one as we are one. John 17:22 I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one. Revelation 3:21 To the one who is victorious, I will give the right to sit with me on my throne, just as I was ...


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The Birth or The Resurrection? The Prologue (1-18) is seen as describing the Word who was with God, coming to earth, and returning to the Father and so the Word became flesh is easily understood as referring to the birth of Jesus. This "movement" of the Word was first described in Isaiah: 8 For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ...


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This is not just a repeat of verse nine. John now emphasizes the mode by which the Word came into the world. The Word had not just simply come into the world. He had done this before on many occasions as seen in the OT theophanies. He is not merely appearing AS flesh as he did to Abraham in Genesis 18 and to Jacob in Genesis 32. This time he becomes flesh ...


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John 1:12 (NLT) tells us: But to all who believed him and accepted him, he gave the right to become children of God. What makes believers children? Romans 8:15 (NLT) says: So you have not received a spirit that makes you fearful slaves. Instead, you received God’s Spirit when he adopted you as his own children. Now we call him, “Abba, Father.” ...


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Who were the “you” in Matthew 3:11? We learn in Matthew 3:5 and Mark 1:4-5 precisely who the the audience of John was: Matthew 3:5 Then went out to him Jerusalem and all Judea, and all the country about Jordan Mark 1:4-5 John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins. And there went out to him all the country ...


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The answer, found in Luke's account of this same event, is everyone - or at least any who would come to be baptized: Luke 3:15–16 And as the people were in expectation, and all men mused in their hearts of John, whether he were the Christ, or not; John answered, saying unto them all, I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier ...


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