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Note the subtlety on the phrase here which says: τῇ Ἑβραΐδι διαλέκτῳ (= "the Hebrew dialect"). Note that it does NOT say "the Hebrew language". The fact that we are talking about either: The Hebrew language and never used in common speech except in priestly and religious settings for reading the ancient scrolls The Aramaic which was ...


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Hebrew was spoken Ancient Greek had a word to refer to Aramaic: Suristi. This word never appears in the New Testament. Since they could have referred to Aramaic if they wanted to, but never did, that would tend to support the view that when they say Hebrew they mean Hebrew. (drawn from a much more detailed discussion by Frank Luke on this site here) For a ...


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Acts 26:14 New International Version We all fell to the ground, and I heard a voice saying to me in Aramaic, 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.' It is not the ancient Hebrew but the dialect of their everyday language. Thayer's Greek Lexicon STRONGS NT 1446: Ἑβραΐς Ἑβραΐς (WH Αβραΐς, see their Introductory § ...


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This is what I observe in the texts of the LXX - Swete; Brenton; Rahlfs 'A' LXX text Judges 17:4 - ... καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μειχαία. Judges 17:5 - καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μειχαία ... . Rahlfs 'B' LXX text: Judges 17:4 - ... καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μιχα. Judges 17:5 - καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μιχα ... . Thus, there appears to be some variation in the text of the LXX at ...


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This is not about the LXX, but all english translations view Mika as an abbreviated form of Mikahyauh and thus transliterate to the same target, as per standard convention. I am not aware of any interpretative tradition which views this as a name change akin from Abram to Abraham or Jacob to Israel nor does the text declare it to be so. It's the same name, ...


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