8

The New American Bible, in note 4 to 2 Kings chapter 3, does initially attribute this triumph to the god Chemosh. However, the New American Bible then suggests an alternative, monotheistic explanation, which inevitably recognises the polytheistic beliefs of the early Israelites and their belief in the efficacy of child sacrifice: The wrath against Israel:...


7

A theological answer would indicate that Rabbinic Jewish and early Christian thinkers did not attribute bodily form or sex to God, though most attributed male gender owing to the preponderance of typically masculine imagery and grammatical forms for God they saw in the Bible. Growing gender awareness has challenged traditional assumptions, and most Jewish ...


7

We find this precedent in the OT: Isa 43:3, 11 - For I am the LORD your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior; ... I, yes I, am the LORD and there is no Savior but Me. Isa 45:17, 21 - But Israel will be saved by the LORD with an everlasting salvation; ... Who foretold this long ago? Who announced it from ancient times? Was it not I, the LORD? There is no ...


6

Gen 18:1 would indicate that this is a theophany. Genesis 18:1 Then the LORD (יהוה)appeared to him by the terebinth trees of Mamre, as he was sitting in the tent door in the heat of the day. יהוה is Yahweh (Jehovah) see for example: יְהֹוָה Jehovah, pr. name of the supreme God (הָאֱלֹהִים) amongst the Hebrews. [Gesenius, W., & ...


6

In Matt 23:37 we read, "O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing." Thus, Jesus compares Himself to a mother hen - a very beautiful and famous metaphor. The Bible often uses the ...


6

The phrase "eyes of the LORD" in the OT is frequent and denotes several things including: God's omniscience; Prov 22:12, 2 Chron 16:9 God's righteous judgement of actions; Amos 9:8, 1 Kings 15:5, Judges 3:12, 2 Chron 27:2, 29:6, 2 Chron 34:2 God's watch care of His people; Deut 11:12, Prov 15:3, Judges 6:1, 13:1 Fascinatingly, Zechariah contains ...


4

The forgiveness is not a prerogative of any created angel, even of a highest of them, for forgiveness is prerogative of only God. When God says that His Angel in whom is His name should be obeyed for "He will not forgive", it means that this Angel in whom is the name of God is of the equal dignity and standing with God, and if so, then also co-eternal to Him,...


4

We know that the Son is not aware of the timing of the end of time. It is not revealed to him, for he says so himself, Matthew 24:36 and Mark 13:32. The Person of the Father is aware of something but the Son is not. Whether, or not, the Spirit (who searcheth the deep things of God, 1 Corinthians 2:10) knows from the Father but does not reveal to the Son ; ...


4

In the beginning God created the heavens (plural) and the earth. From other scriptures we know that the third heaven (the heaven of heavens) is God's dwelling place. The first heavens are visible. The second heavens, therefore, are invisible but not God's primary dwelling places. After the statement regarding the beginning, the earth is said to be bohu and ...


4

This question can be decided on two bases; Grammatical/Semantic and Narrative flow. Grammar/Semantics The operative word he in Gen 3:9 is the final word in the verse, אַיֶּֽכָּה - the interrogative adverb being אַי = "Where" which occurs 36 times in the OT (eg, Gen 3:9, 4:9, 16:8, Deut 32:37, Judges 13:6, 1 Sam 9:18, etc) and is almost always ...


4

Although it is commonplace to apply the title of Savior to Jesus, Paul uses it to refer to God the Father as well. -- A relevant parallel Compare to 1 Timothy 1:1: Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the commandment of God our Saviour, and Lord Jesus Christ, which is our hope; I do not doubt there are those who would interpret this passage differently, but ...


3

What these verses imply is that, whatever “image of God” implies, sex is irrelevant. In the Jewish view, since God has no physical form at all, it is meaningless to speak of His sex. The various Hebrew words that translate as “God” all have masculine grammatical gender. (The word for “spirit”, ruach, has feminine gender though, so the “spirit of God” which “...


3

In context, Paul is talking about Christ crucified (1:23), i.e. a submission to shameful death which surely looked too "weak" to be the activity of God. And yet this "weakness" is stronger than men's strength, because through it God conquered sin and death.


3

ο θεος αγαπη εστιν [TR - I John 4:8] These are John's exact words in that text. The literal translation of this is 'the God love is'. It could also be rendered 'the Deity love is.' Because the word Theos in Greek, 'God' in English, is neither a name nor a title, it is a concept. The concept is a matter of nature and the nature that is being identified is ...


3

Full disclosure - I hold Trinitarian beliefs. The argument presented in this question for the third person of the Godhead, the Holy Spirit" is very dangerous because it equates the Holy Spirit with the power of Jesus or God. This is precisely the argument used by "Binitarians"* who say that the Holy Spirit is merely the power of God at work in the world ...


3

Jesus in John 10 said He is a door, Is he really a door? No, is a symbol, In the same chapter we are represented as sheeps, are we literally sheeps? No, they are symbols. Is God a mother based of an interpretation of a symbol? NO, In the whole Bible He is never referred as mother, but always in a masculine way. Why then we call him Father? because Jesus call ...


3

Wisdom is personified in Proverb 8. As a literary device, its feminine aspect carries some story-lesson value. The word "wisdom" (Chokmah, חכמה) being linguistically a feminine gender is a Hebrew grammatical issue that does not carry weight into theological significance. Interestingly, the Greek word for wisdom (sophia, σοφία) is also feminine and ...


3

The eyes here is symbolic of God's omnipresence and omniscience. It is not to be taken literally. Another example is in Hebrews 4:13 Nothing in all creation is hidden from God's sight; everything is uncovered and exposed before the eyes of Him to whom we must give account. Based solely on Proverbs 15:3 - How many eyes does God have? Infinite.


3

The context of Revelation 1 shapes how we read of God and His son in the rest of the book. (and impacts how we read of God and His son in the rest of the bible) The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his bond-servants... 1:1 The one who overcomes, I will make him a pillar in the temple of my God 3:12 I will write on him the name of ...


3

I would say, No. Your questions, in this place, cannot be answered from this particular passage. Human spirit/human nature is different from Divine Spirit/Divine nature. Comparison is drawn here, between the two, but in a limited way, explaining something which is true of Deity by comparing that same thing with one certain aspect of humanity. One aspect ...


3

It is obviously true that mankind was created in the image of God (Gen 1:26, 27) but that this image was marred by sin (Gen 3). The whole purpose of the plan of salvation is to restore that image in us which the the Bible describes in a variety of ways. Since Jesus is the image of God (Col 1:15) the language of the NT is usually to make us like Christ. 2 ...


2

I also think (as in the previous comment) that it is meaningless to speak of the gender of God And it is unwise, in many cases, to try and equate grammatical gender with actual gender. The word for "spirit" is grammatically feminine in the Hebrew, and grammatically neuter in the Greek, but this tells us nothing at all about the actual gender of the Holy ...


2

It is because the gentile woman addresses Jesus as the Son of David. David was a shepherd who became the great king of Israel. Jesus as the Son of David indicates His being a shepherd and also king of Israel. As the Son of David, the shepherd and king of Israel, Jesus can't help this gentile woman. This title is reserved only for the Israelites as seen in ...


2

The seed in the parable is the word of God, that is, the message. Compare this parable to the Parable of the Sower which occurs immediately above this parable in the same chapter (Matthew 13) and includes an explanation of the parable. Matt 13:3-4 And he spake many things unto them in parables, saying, Behold, a sower went forth to sow; And when he sowed, ...


2

The answer that was given "begs the question?" I know it says that the Lord God appeared to Abraham at vs1 with two other men at vs3. So how did the Lord God appear since Jesus Himself says at John 1:18 God cannot be seen. Furthermore, you have at Genesis 16:13 Hagar saying "Thou are a God who sees; for she said, "Have I even remained alive here AFTER SEEING ...


2

Consider the facts and the context. The king of Moab restores 200,000 sheep to king Ahab of Israel. After king Ahab of Israel dies, the shepherd king of Moab annuls his allegiance. Ahab's son, the new king of Israel, goes to war as a result, and the kings of Judah and Edom agree to help him. The three kings run into supply problems and then decide to ...


2

The Lord tests the righteousness for sin, which he (the Lord) hates. That is, the wickedness of the righteous is in view according to Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi). Please click the image below in order to enlarge. In this precise regard, the following graph depicts both the musical and logical division of phrases in the Masoretic Text. Please click the ...


2

This messenger is given divine authority that only the Most High has. I assume you had something like Matthew 9:2-8, Mark 2:5-12, or Luke 5:20-26 and 7:47-50 in the back of your mind when writing this. However, such connections seem out of place here, since the quoted passage appears to speak about the trivial type of forgiveness of sins, namely, that ...


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