9

Good Q. There is a deep meaning to this that takes some time to realise - a lifetime! It's expressed through Rom 6:11. Even so consider yourselves to be dead to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus. While we have been included in Christ's ascended life, made 'alive' in a whole new way, we must continue to plumb the depths of how we have died. Sin had hold ...


8

τὸν μὴ γνόντα ἁμαρτίαν ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν ἁμαρτίαν ἐποίησεν....1 "For he caused him who knew nothing of sin to be sin for us...." The preceding vv. 18-20 make it clear that 'he' is θεός (God), and 'him who knew nothing of sin' in this context is Χριστός (Christ). The presence of the article (τὸν) with the participle γνόντα indicates that it functions as a ...


6

Job lived 140 years (Job 42:16), a long life, similar to the patriarchs. For that reason it is said that he lived during the period of the patriarchs. During the patriarchal age, the head of the family also covered the function of offering sacrifices. In other words, he was the priest of his family. (1) So Job, conceived by the writer as living in ...


5

ἀπόλουσαι is a second person singular aorist middle imperative (2S AMI) from ἀπολούω meaning "to wash away from oneself." It can not be derived either from ἀπολύω (2S AMI = ἀπολύσαι; "depart"1 ) or ἀπόλλυμι (2S AMI = ἀπόλου; "perish"). In addition to the morphologic discrepancies, the middle forms of both ἀπολύω and ἀπόλλυμι are intransitive verbs, meaning ...


5

"Atonement" I can only give an overview in this answer. The details and proof are such that it runs to ten pages which simply cannot be reproduced here. LINK : The full explanation, containing all references and texts, is available from my website as a PDF to view online HERE or to download. Treatment The word has been used to translate two Hebrew ...


4

Is there an Old Testament basis for Hebrews 10:3? "But in those sacrifices there is a reminder of sins year by year."- Hebrews 10:3. Is there an Old Testament basis for Hebrews 10:3? Yes Paul, was alluding to the annual sacrifices for atonement of the people of Israel.Leviticus 16:34 Under the Mosaic Law, sacrifices were made, on the annual Day of ...


4

The Hebrew text וְעִנִּיתֶם אֶת נַפְשֹׁתֵיכֶם (alternatively תְּעַנּוּ אֶת נַפְשֹׁתֵיכֶם) literally says "and ye shall afflict your souls," and it appears in two separate sections in Leviticus as well as once in Numbers. This text has always been understood to mean afflict your body through fasting. That being said, there is also a spiritual component to ...


3

The verb is poeio ('made') which is a very broad concept covering both 'make' and 'do' in English. 'Effected' is, I would say, a better translation. In God's eyes, sin was accounted to him. Sin itself. Sin which came into the world. That God sees sin in him, at Golgotha, is all that is required for it to be so. And sin is seen being destroyed when Jesus ...


2

The word for afflict is the Hebrew is H6031 and is transliterated "anah". This word carries with it the idea of humble, quiet reflection and introspection as well as an acknowledgement of confession. It would likely have included forms of self denial such as fasting (Isaiah 58:3) but not been limited to it. It is a time of recognizing ones own ...


2

Here's what I discovered about this: According to Moulton and Milligan's The Vocabulary of the Greek New Testament, "Receipts are often introduced by the phrase τετέλεσται, usually written in an abbreviated manner, e.g., P Grenf II. 50(a)(b)(c) al., mostly belonging to ii/A.D." You can view Bernard Grenfell's (and Arthur Hunt's) publication of these ...


2

We should clearly distinguish between an atonement metaphor such as the sanctuary system and the theological reality, the removal of our sin. The Bible talks about the reality of Jesus taking our sins many times - here is a sample of what is known as the great "Divine Exchange" - 2 Cor 5:21, God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that ...


2

"logic" is not really in view here. Paul's argument in 2 Cor 5:14 is building up to what has become known as the great "divine trade" in 2 Cor 5:21, "God made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, so that in Him we might become the righteousness of God." This was necessary because of: Rom 3:23, "for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of ...


2

All is ALL. Every person since Adam is included in Christ's sacrifice. Acts 10:43 All the prophets testify about Him that everyone who believes in Him receives forgiveness of sins through His name." Acts 4:12 "And there is salvation in no one else; for there is no other name under heaven that has been given among men by which we must be saved....


2

As stated above life is in the blood. Now, I will try and give VERY EASY CONCEPT of blood atonement for you to understand. Let's go: “But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.” — Genesis 2:17 (KJV) From the beginning we learn that the penalty of sin is death. ...


2

The goal of Hebrews is not to explain why I think to answer the question of why, we need to turn Hebrews on its head, because in this passage, the goal of the author is to teach, going from the natural to the spiritual, the principle of forgiveness of sins: And almost all things are by the law purged with blood; and without shedding of blood is no remission....


2

Your post is good and your thoughts are clear. What isn’t clear to me is why you feel that there is a need to reconcile Jesus as the High Priest according to Melchizedek with the type of the High Priest under the Law according to the Levitical priesthood. The glory, scope and design of the New Covenant far exceeds the Old Covenant. We have a prophet LIKE ...


1

Actually, the NT uses a technical word for this blood-atonement usually translated, "propitiation". Propitiation or expiation (Greek: “hilasterion”) denotes the act of appeasing a deity by sacrifice to incur divine favour (it is only an analogue, metaphor or figure of speech!). Thus, Jesus’ sacrifice is described as propitiation in: Rom 3:25 - ...


1

Jesus's sacrifice ("the [Christ] must give his life a ransom for many" Mt 20:28) is the basis of the effectiveness of such forgiveness outside the immediate context of sacrifice. In other words, you can't forgive if you are in hell, where you'd be if Christ hadn't ransomed you from sin and death. Jesus' focus in His ministry is how Christians are ...


1

The NT uses a technical word for this blood-atonement usually translated, "propitiation". Propitiation or expiation (Greek: “hilasterion”) denotes the act of appeasing a deity by sacrifice to incur divine favour (it is only an analogue, metaphor or figure of speech!). Thus, Jesus’ sacrifice is described as propitiation in: Rom 3:25 - whom God ...


1

Your observation seems to be the correct one, however I would advise against referencing Maccabees, as there are passages that directly conflict with parts of canon scripture, for example what is written in II Mac. 12:46: "It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins." This passage teaches ...


1

I found a very plain explanation by J. Milgrom, in the JPS Torah commentary. Quote below: The verb כפר in this context carries the connotation of “make appeasement.” In the cults of the ancient Near East, incense served to appease and soothe divine wrath. This is strikingly illustrated by the Egyptian reliefs depicting Canaanite ruler-priests ...


1

Koulaki Megalo Etymologiko Liddell & Scott, Greek-English Lexicon ὑπό C.WITH ACCUS. II.of subjection, ποιεῖσθαι ὑπὸ σφᾶς id=Thuc., etc. Georg Autenrieth's Homeric Lexicon μένω c. c. acc. & inf., wait “οὐκ ἔμειν᾽ ἐλθεῖν τράπεζαν νυμφίαν” P. 3.16 The word ὑπέμεινεν in the context implies "waiting patiently", or "submitted unto", or "resolved ...


1

Without doing any exegesis, I would just say that shedding blood, and especially killing, changes a person. I saw that in the military a lot. That violence--indeed all of our past--becomes a part of who we are. So even if/when God forgives, as he did with David, we are still changed by the events. I have been sober from alcohol for almost 20 years, but in ...


1

Reference: How can John 3:13-14 be reconciled with what happened to Enoch, Elijah and Jesus? **@joseph states: Jesus was Not the first mortal man to enter heaven, since Elijah and Enoch (and perhaps Moses as well) had entered heaven before Jesus. However, Jesus was the first immortal man to enter heaven, because his immortality stemmed from his ...


1

Preamble The first occurrence of kaphar in the Bible: Make thee an ark of gopher wood; rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and shalt pitch it within and without with pitch. -- Genesis 6:14 (KJV) Here, God instructs Noah "to pitch" (כָּפַר Strong's H3722 - kaphar) the walls of the ark from inside and out with "pitch" (כֹּפֶר Strong's H3724 - kopher). ...


1

The English word "atonement" is most commonly understood in the modern context as reparation for a wrong or injury (e.g. Concise Oxford English Dictionary). This does not capture the entire scope of the word, however, in either contemporary or archaic usage. The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary provides the following expanded definitions: 1 ...


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