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There are two primary pieces of linguistic evidence that can be used to refute Peshitta primacy: the dialect used in Peshitta, and the use of geyr and deyn throughout the text of Peshitta. First, regarding the dialect of Peshitta: In Peshitta all verbs in the 3rd person Masculine Imperfective form use the n'- prefix. The only Aramaic dialect that used that ...


5

At one stage, Matthew's Gospel was thought likely to have been written in Hebrew, mainly because it had been attributed to one of the disciples, who would have written for Jewish Christians in Hebrew. That hypothesis would work equally well or even better if Matthew had been written in Aramaic. Research has now shown that Matthew could only have been written ...


4

Koine Greek does not have an indefinite article, and the definite article is not used the way the english definite article is used. That means it's up to the interpreter to add in indefinite articles as needed based on the context. Moreover the genitive can be translated with an apostrophe or the more ambiguous "of" construction. Finally anthropous ...


2

(This should be a comment, but I'm new and don't have enough reputation points to comment) The above answer by user33515 doesn't seem to address the poster's question. The question is whether ἀνθρώπου should be translated into English with the indefinite article, "of a man", or without the indefinite article, "of man". The former (presumably) implies the ...


1

Direct evidence The closest thing to what you're looking for would be Shem Tob Matthew. It's a copy of the Gospel of Matthew in Hebrew that was written into a 14th century Jewish polemic against Christianity. George Howard, who published an extensive review of Shem Tob Matthew (see link above), contended that the Hebrew text was not a translation but was a ...


1

1. The Armenian Archive as Evidence of Aramaic Primacy: Possible Answer 1: Because of the evident use of Syriac / Aramaic in the Early Church, and the sheer number of extant manuscripts available, Aramaic was probably the highest priority and utilized for audiences within Israel and in other Semitic populations, (like Hebrews, James; and not like Romans, ...


1

All manuscripts of the Greek text read ἀριθμὸς γὰρ ἀνθρώπου ἐστίν. Translating literally in Greek word order yields the nonsensical, "Number for of a man it is". It is rendered in English word order as "for it is the number of a man" (e.g. NIV, ESV, KJV), "for the number is that of a man" (e.g. NASB), and even "because it is a human total number" (ISV). ...


1

Whoa, that's a tall order. One unfortunately I'm not sure who could fill. That weird word epiousios, is so unique and hard to figure out because it's a word describing something given once that doesn't run out. "Give us this day our once for all time bread" Shona Syriac Matthew 6:11 ܗܒ ܠܢ ܠܚܡܐ ܕܤܘܢܩܢܢ ܝܘܡܢܐ mutipei nhasi chikafu chedu chemisi yose; Our ...


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