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15

Disclaimer on Perspective For the record, I do not hold to the Documentary Hypothesis (JEDP theory or otherwise) as another answer here gives as a solution. I believe the Pentateuch was largely (if not perhaps wholly) scribed by a single inspired author, Moses. As such, the Pentateuch should be looked at as a unity, including Gen 1:1-2:3 in relation to Gen ...


14

This theory is pretty credible. There a great deal of scholars which entertain this idea who are collectively known as Panbabylonists. This seems to raise the ire of many purists who would like to believe that Genesis was influenced by God alone. In my opinion, however many fail to consider the idea that perhaps sections of Genesis were not derived from ...


13

Hebrew ṣelāʽ (thus the correct transliteration) is a clear cognate of Akkadian ṣēlu and Arabic ḍilʽ and ḍilaʽ, all of which primarily mean “rib”, but are also metaphorically used to mean “side”. They are very widely attested in Akkadian and Arabic and leave no doubt as to their meaning. It is a basic Semitic noun for a body part. From a linguistic point of ...


12

One view (and the view I hold to) of the Genesis account in Gen 1:1-2:3 indicates that God created a fully functioning creation at the end of seven days, with the earth, plants, animals, heavenly bodies, and mankind all formed to function as an interrelated whole like God intended. Genesis 2:4-25 is an expanded history of what is stated to have transpired ...


10

The idea of a "son" in first century Christian writings was different than it is today. The term "son" simply signified that he came from God and bore His image. (examples) Both of these things are true of Adam: Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness . . . " God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created ...


10

Good question. While no state of maturity for Adam and Eve at creation is ever explicitly stated in the Bible, there are some texts where we can infer something about their state. Adam is created to work the garden and care for it (Genesis 2:15). He then names the animals (Genesis 2:19, 20). This is not something that an infant could do. Adam and Eve are to ...


10

The theory that 120 years refers to the remaining life of Adam does not seem to be supportable from the chronology in chapter 5: Genesis 5 tells us that Adam lived for 930 years, so this statement would have happened when he was 810 years old. According to the chronology in chapter 5, this places the statement after the birth of Methusela (Noah's ...


9

My question is: Is there a place in Scripture from which we can draw a dogmatic conclusion as to whether Adam was created as a fully developed man, or as a new born babe? Based on the nature of the literary genre of Genesis, and comparisons of Gen.1-3 with other origin stories of ancient near eastern literature I would say the answer to your question is ...


9

The view one takes on the credibility of the assertion is going to depend largely on one's presuppositions and level of allowance for the Bible text to speak for itself. If the Torah (Law, i.e. "teaching" is the idea in Hebrew, not just the actual commands and prohibitions), which includes Genesis, was formed contra what critical scholars claim, and instead ...


8

According to the rabbinical tradition stated in the Medrashim and mentioned in Rashi's commentary on Genesis 3-1, they did have sex in the Garden. In fact, it is related that the Serpent saw them having sex and became jealous, provoking him to bring about The Fall. The Rabbis found a hint to this idea in Genesis 3-1 And the serpent... Which indicates ...


8

We do not inherit sin, the following is copied from Xeno's comment at Polyhat's answer: Scripture plainly teaches that sin is not inherited: “[T]he son shall not bear the iniquity of the father” (Eze. 18:20). Everyone is responsible for their own conduct (Rom. 14:12). Sinfulness begins in one's youth (Gen. 8:21; Jer. 3:25). Children must reach a level of ...


7

I would point out that the Hebrew text lends itself to the translation "rib." The text in Genesis 2:21 literally reads, "And he [the Lord God] took one ['aḥat] from his side [miṭṭela'] and he closed the flesh after them [taḥtennah]." The "one" would suggest a part of the side, and the "after them" (with a feminine plural suffix) would suggest that the one ...


7

John Gill (1) says about two places, a field near Damascus and the Mount Moriah: some say it was a field near Damascus; the Targum of Jonathan is, “he went and dwelt in Mount Moriah, to till the ground out of which he was created;” and so other Jewish writers say (F16), the gate of paradise was near Mount Moriah, and there Adam dwelt after he was cast ...


6

The reason for translating this word as "rib" in this passage most likely has to do with Genesis 2:23 in which Adam states "This one at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh" (NET). While you are correct that this word is often translated as chamber, according to the NAS Exhaustive Concordance, the NASB most often translates צֵלָע (tsela) as side ...


6

With any theory like this its just as credible that the influence goes the other way. The argument that the Sumerians could not influence the Hebrews directly is bunk, in that perhaps they could not directly influence the author of Genesis, but since they would have been contemporary with Abraham they could have influenced the stream of Hebrew thought at an ...


6

Genesis 4:25 (NIV): Adam made love to his wife again, and she gave birth to a son and named him Seth, saying, “God has granted me another child in place of Abel, since Cain killed him.” Seth was named by Eve in honour of Abel, after Cain killed him. So the natural interpretation is that Abel was killed shortly before the 130th year, probably at most a few ...


6

Adam is 'the figure of him that was to come', Romans 5:14, and the coming one is expressly revealed to be 'the seed of the woman', Genesis 3:15. The creation of humanity is the expression of God, the Creator, and he creates that which is according to his own will, his own purpose, his own desires and his own person. That which was created was a figure of the ...


5

Assuming a literal reading of the text (which is how the hermeneutic I hold takes Genesis), then in one 24 hour period, the 6th day of creation, Adam (and by extension on some of the points, Eve) was:1 Made fully capable of understanding language, as God spoke to them (Gen 1:28; cf. Gen 2:15-17) Made fully capable of sexual reproduction to multiply on the ...


5

In seminary I wrote a paper on how Adam and Eve violated all 10 commandments in the garden. I'll spare you the whole paper but there are several reasons to believe that Adam and Eve are not simply being honest. First, compare Gen 2:16-17 and Gen 3:2-3. The command of God has already been distorted. Since God gave the command directly to Adam, it is ...


5

It's an interesting reading, and some might even say that it accounts for why Eve says "we were told not to eat" — both man and woman were in this joined protohuman. But I disagree with the overused claim that this represents a "deeper" reading simply because it takes the name for its symbolic meaning. Is it a deeper reading if we take Jonah to be talking ...


5

The answer(s) to your question requires a foundation. For most, that foundation is doctrinal. It is that foundation that was established via seminaries, and the systematic theology they present. This outline will not use that foundation. I say this to advise caution, and also to alert that if your seeking an answer that ‘fits’ the traditional view - this won’...


5

Oooo! This was one of the matters that divided the church during the reformation over which much debate occurred. The matter was technically know as "Original Sin" and the matter to be resolved here is: Is "Original Sin" an inherited guilt or and inherited tendency to sin? That is, we inherit something from Adam and Eve is not disputed ...


4

Two creation accounts compared A comparison of the creation story in Genesis 1:1-2:4a with that in Genesis 2:4b-25 raises some interesting contradictions. In the first story, man (and woman) are the last of God's creation, for example after all other animals have been created, whereas in the second story, Adam ('man') is the very first of God's creations ...


4

The Hebrews reads הָֽאָדָ֖ם note the article הָֽ ('the') before אָדָם ('man', 'mankind', 'Adam'). Going back to Gen 1:27 we read: So God created man ( אֶת־הָֽאָדָם֙ )in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. ( NKJ) Notice that it is exactly the same term "the man" in both cases (though this is obscured in ...


4

OP has already done a fine job in identifying the problem, and setting out solutions. The majority of modern commentators take ...ʾādām here as a reference to a place name, "Adam" (as in Joshua 3:16, as noted by OP). The notion that the following šām "there" requires a place-name as antecedent, and that the only viable candidate is ...ʾādām, is widely found ...


4

I believe that the word כְּאָדָם in Hosea 6:7 may have been a clever play by the author to refer to both the city referred to in Joshua 3:16 and the Adam of Genesis. Throughout the book of Hosea, the author mentions several places which were identified as committing idolatry, sinning, or otherwise acting against G-d's will. These places include Samaria and ...


4

וַתִּקְרָ֥א אֶת־שְׁמ֖וֹ שֵׁ֑ת means "And she called his name 'Seth'". Hava is speaking in the portion of the verse in question. וַתִּקְרָ֥א is the qal imperfect 3fs of qara' (he called). 3fs stands for third feminine singular meaning one woman is the subject. The subject simply being a pronoun in this case. Hebrew verbs change form depending on the subject. ...


4

The term אָדָם ('adam) has four different uses with reference to people in the OT: 1) a man as in a human person, whether male or female (e.g. Lev 13:2); 2) a man as opposed to woman (e.g. Eccl 7:28); 3) collectively mankind as a reference to all of humanity (e.g. Deut 8:3); and 4) Adam, the male individual who was the first human created and from which ...


4

The Knowledge of Good and Evil Question: What is the Knowledge of Good and Evil and why is it spiritually lethal? (Gen. 2:17) Suppose we break down the identity of the Tree a bit. The first part of the clause is the "Tree of the Knowledge of Good." But the first couple already possessed that knowledge. Therefore, perhaps we might safely ...


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