Hot answers tagged

7

The jerusalem council dealt with a specific set of believers, ones who at the time were "God-fearing" gentiles meeting in Jewish synagogues (since the early church always met in synagogues). In these synagogues, gentiles who were on the path to coversion could meet provided they met the Law of Noah, and so this council told them to (effectively) ...


4

Just reading through the entire Jerusalem council decree on that occasion shows that the words 'rabbit' or 'pig' or, indeed, any kind of creature never consumed by the Jews for food (including many forbidden sea-creatures) never crop up anywhere. So, the simple answer to your question is that they did not allow believers to eat e.g. rabbit or pig meat. They ...


3

Well, did he? The parenthetical sentence in Mark 7:19 is not found in the KJV or YLT etc. Where it does appear, as in the NIV, a footnote explains, "In saying this, Jesus declared all foods 'clean' - Mark adds this parenthetical comment to help his readers see the significance of Jesus' pronouncements for them (see Acts 10:9-16)." But did Mark ...


3

Jesus never declared all foods clean. There is no such text in the Bible to indicate so. The vision that Peter had came in the form of symbols, using imagery that Peter well understood, and Peter immediately knew what God was telling him when he descended from the rooftop where he had had the vision and found Gentiles waiting to summon him to their home. ...


2

The text of NA28/UBS5, W&H, SBL, etc, reads: ἀλλὰ ἀποταξάμενος καὶ εἰπών Πάλιν ἀνακάμψω πρὸς ὑμᾶς τοῦ Θεοῦ θέλοντος, ἀνήχθη ἀπὸ τῆς Ἐφέσου = but taking leave of them and saying, "I will return to you again if God wills," he set sail from Ephesus. MSS that have this text include: P74(VII), 01(350), 02(V), 03(IV), 08(VI), 33(IX), 307(X), 453(...


2

Acts 18:21 New International Version: But as he left, he promised, "I will come back if it is God's will." Then he set sail from Ephesus. King James Bible: But bade them farewell, saying, I must by all means keep this feast that cometh in Jerusalem: but I will return again unto you, if God will. And he sailed from Ephesus. Why do so many ...


2

We are discussing two different words in the Greek that have separate meanings that the KJV unhappily translated with the same word in English. Let be be more specific: In John 1:12, the operative word is ἐξουσία (exousia) for which BDAG has seven sub-meanings, but the pertinent one here is: potential or resource to command, control, or govern, capability, ...


2

Power in John 1:12 and Acts 1:8 translates two different Greek works. In John 1:12 ἐξουσία means power usually in the sense of authority. ἐξουσία, ας f: the power to do something, with or without an added implication of authority—‘power.’ ἡ γὰρ ἐξουσία τῶν ἵππων ἐν τῷ στόματι αὐτῶν ἐστιν καὶ ἐν ταῖς οὐραῖς αὐτῶν ‘the power of the horses is in their mouths ...


2

H. Spirit is not a material thing to pour or to blow (John 3:8), all those expressions are metaphors and symbols standing for spiritual realities and phenomena. It is the same as to ask how is David the Psalmist a person if he says to be poured out like water (Psalm 11:14), or how Federer can be a man when sports journal writes about him winning title that &...


2

Did the Jerusalem council allow believers to eat e.g., rabbit meat? In short, the Scriptures don't specifically say other than what is outlined in Acts 15:29. What does the Biblical record show that would give Colossian believers a clean conscience about eating rabbit meat? Let us look at the events in chronological order. Jeremiah prophesies about a new ...


1

This, and similar questions, are all related to a general misunderstanding of Paul's letters to Gentile communities, which are commonly misinterpreted as warnings to Jewish communities against reverting back to Jewish practices. In fact they are all instances of Gentiles reverting back to their previous pagan practices. In the case of the Jerusalem Council, ...


1

Jesus never declared all foods clean. Although Polyhat and Anne did a great job answering the question, I would like to add a couple of things. The problem in Mark 7:1-23 and Matthew 15:1-20 is not Torah based ritual purity. It is the traditions of the elders. The handwashing discussed in the chapter is still practised by Jews today, and it is called netilat ...


1

The problem pointed by User 48152 can be resolved with the combined usage of textual criticism and context. Starting with the first method (textual criticism), I now quote some samples of comments (by Bible scholars; from now on, the bold is added by me): “The Textus Receptus has here a sentence not in the best MSS.: ‘I must by all means keep this feast ...


1

How can the Holy Spirit be a person if He (or it) can be 'poured out' according to Acts 2:17? As a person, the Holy Spirit can only be poured out metaphorically. In another sense, the Holy Spirit functions as an unction, 1 Samuel 16: Then Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him in the midst of his brothers; and the Spirit of the LORD came upon David ...


1

Are these seven Christians but their father is a Jewish temple priest? Ellicott didn't think so: a Jewish chief priest. The word might mean that he was at the head of one of the twenty-four courses into which the priests of the Temple were divided. It is hardly probable, however, that one in that position would have taken to this disreputable calling, and ...


1

Apollos Both BDAG and Thayer suggest that Ἀπολλώς is a contraction of Ἀπολλώνιος (Apollonios) as the case in Acts 18:24 in the Codex Bezea Cantabrigiensis. Thus, The name means, "belonging to, or of Apollo" (the most famous Greek god.) Apollyon The Greek Ἀπολλύων definitely means "destroyer". BDAG offers this comment: Whether the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible