Hot answers tagged

29

Abraham told his servants that He and Isaac would return because He knew that God could raise Isaac from the dead. Heb. 11:17-19, "17 By faith Abraham hath offered up Isaac, being tried, and the only begotten he did offer up who did receive the promises, 18 of whom it was said -- `In Isaac shall a seed be called to thee;' 19 reckoning that even out of ...


16

The answer is simple: Abraham was hiding his true intentions from Isaac - were he to know what he was trying to do with him he would surely protest. This is evident from verses 7-9: The fire and wood are here,” Isaac said, “but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?” Abraham answered, “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.”...


14

A Blasphemy Which Requires Stoning There are three points in the Fourth Gospel at which the Jews respond to something Jesus said by wanting to kill Him. The first is in Chapter 5; the second in Chapter 8, and the third in Chapter 10. It is in the final event in which John includes the reason for stoning: 31 Then the Jews took up stones again to stone Him. ...


12

Short Answer: I think there is precedent for considering Isaac Abraham's "only son" in one sense despite the fact that Ishamel was also technically his son in another sense based solely on the fact that Ishmael was born by Hagar the concubine and not by Sarah his wife. The "contradiction" In Genesis 22:2 God said to Abraham: Take now ...


11

Short Answer: Abram did indeed depart from Haran after his father died, as the Old Testament indicates, and as the New Testament explicitly claims. (Terah was 130 years old when Abram was born.) Good question. (This happens to be one of the most commonly asked -- and addressed -- "discrepancies" in Scripture.) The problem is in the modern Western reading ...


10

It could be contested that Heb 11:9 actually reads "as did Isaac and Jacob", as per the NIV, but that's not your question! In summary: Abraham was 100 years old when Isaac was born (Genesis 21:5) Abraham was 175 years old when he died (Genesis 25:7) Isaac was 60 years old when Jacob was born (Genesis 25:26) Therefore Jacob would have known Abraham for ...


9

The claim of Divinity The people sought to stone Jesus for blasphemy - the statement that put them over the edge, and would serve as their justification for trying to stone him again later (see John 10:31-33), wasn't simply that He insulted them or claimed to have existed since before the days of Abraham - He claimed something much more than that. Those well-...


8

The "two" in some translations is an interpretative addition. It does not exist in the Hebrew of Gen 18:22, which is simply הָֽאֲנָשִׁ֔ים ("the men"). The word "two" is added in those translations for "clarity" (which clarity can inadvertently create confusion, such as evidenced in your question). The idea is added because it is understood by many ...


8

What Promise is this? There is none in these words. So write Sanday and Headlam (A critical and exegetical commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, 5th edn (ICC; T & T Clark, 1902), p. 111). They don't go on to explain much, and here James Denney (notable Scottish theologian) does a better job in the Expositor's Greek Testament (Hodder & Stoughton, ...


8

According to a variety of commentaries the name Abram means "high father" while Abraham means "Father of a multitude". The reason it is only "probably" in your commentary is because the usage of the word raham is not clearly attested to in ancient Hebrew itself, but only in closely related languages. Ellicott's Commentary explains it well, plus offers a ...


8

I can see, at the moment, a couple of reasons why the passage is important: In Genesis 14 Chedorlaomer attacked the kings of the plain and took away Lot together with all the people and possessions of the land. Abraham set out on a rescue mission, defeated Chedorlaomer, and returned everything that was taken. The king of Sodom wanted to reward Abraham by ...


7

I think that the premise of this question is mistaken. El Elyon simply means the Most High God in Hebrew, i.e. the creator of everything. El is a word that means god in Hebrew. The Canaanites spoke a version of Hebrew and called their Supreme God, El. Many religions have a Supreme God that created everything else. For example, in Hinduism, the Brahman is ...


6

My Hebrew is basic, but I do read Greek. Sarah refers to Abraham as her kurios in Genesis 18:12 in the Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament.) Yet she does not address him directly with that word in her commentary of 1 Peter, Karen Jobes (2005:205) notes that "This noun [kurios] is the only lexical connection between the story of Sarah and Peter’s claim.” ...


6

Gen 22: 5 calls Isaac, "na'ar" in Hebrew, (English transl. for 'lad') "From na'ar; (concretely) a boy (as active), from the age of infancy to adolescence; by implication, a servant; also (by interch. Of sex), a girl (of similar latitude in age) -- babe, boy, child, damsel (from the margin), lad, servant, young (man)." http://biblehub.com/hebrew/5289.htm ...


6

Gen 18:1 would indicate that this is a theophany. Genesis 18:1 Then the LORD (יהוה)appeared to him by the terebinth trees of Mamre, as he was sitting in the tent door in the heat of the day. יהוה is Yahweh (Jehovah) see for example: יְהֹוָה Jehovah, pr. name of the supreme God (הָאֱלֹהִים) amongst the Hebrews. [Gesenius, W., & ...


6

This site explains it with more biblical context for support. Namely: Abram/Abraham was currently allies with an Amorite Gen 14:14. "not yet full" Amorites increased in Idolatry = "iniquity" Amorites increased in Immorality = "iniquity" "Complete" when Israel displaces Canaan/Amorite under Joshua. The entire context of Leviticus 18 and Leviticus 20 ...


6

Was this a standard way to prepare a sacrifice? No. The verb used to describe the binding of Isaac is ʿqd, a term used only here in the Hebrew Bible. There are other terms that could be used to describe a similar action, but none of them is used to describe the preparation of the burnt offering, related most elaborately in Leviticus 1.1 There the basic ...


6

Actually, when I looked at verses 4-8 in the literal translation (Young's Literal) I found ten things : 1) I -- lo, My covenant `is' with thee, and 2) thou hast become father of a multitude of nations; 3) and thy name is no more called Abram, but thy name hath been Abraham 4) for a father of many nations have I made thee. 5) and I have made thee exceeding ...


5

This is an interesting question. To put this verse into context we must begin with chapter 12 where we learn that G-d commands Avram to leave his home and to go to some place G-d will eventually show him and therein make from him a "great nation." Gen. 12:1. He goes -- at the age of 75 and childless, bringing with him his wife and nephew. At Gen. 12:7, G-...


5

The classic Jewish commentator Rashi quoting the Medrash and the Talmud says: and Abraham weighed out to Ephron: עֶפְרֹן is spelled without a “vav,” because he promised much but did not do even a little [i.e., he promised the cave as a gift but took a great deal of money for it], for he took from him large shekels, viz. centenaria [worth one hundred ...


5

In Gershon Hepner's “The Affliction and Divorce of Hagar Involves Violations of the Covenant and Deuteronomic Codes”1 he claims that the key to Sarah’s demand ostensibly lies in a clause in Lipit-Ishtar where it is stipulated that if the father grants freedom to a slave woman and the children she has borne him they forfeit their share of the paternal ...


5

Exodus 12:44 elaborates the phrase in question as, עֶבֶד אִישׁ מִקְנַת־כָּסֶף (eved ish miknat-kesef), “a slave, a man purchase of money.” Abraham was to circumcise both his own offspring (e.g., Ishmael, Isaac) as well as the slaves that he purchased from foreigners.1 Footnotes 1 cf. Lev. 25:44


4

No one has commented on the section of Scripture between Gen 18:2-5 and Gen 18:23-25. There is a whole dialog where the "visitor" specifically asks after Sarah, (verse 9...how did He know her name?) The "visitor" reaffirms the promise Abraham had received directly from the Lord that He, the Lord, would grant Abraham a son (verse 14), that He would return ...


4

When the Tanak was first written, it was written without vowels. In the early Middle Ages (ca AD 800), scribes known as the Masoretes added the system of vowel points (niqqud or "diacretic markings") that are used in pointed Hebrew texts since then. Other systems were developed at roughly the same time (as Hebrew became less of a spoken language), but only ...


4

This passage would have been understood according to its plain meaning, and in the context of the previous passages, that is, that after G-d promised Abram something almost unbelievable, Abram truly believed and we are told that he was rewarded for this act of faith. Just before this passage, G-d spoke to Abram and said: (Genesis 15:3) "Do not be afraid, ...


4

In regard to the specific request regarding background information from scripture about Abram's the mother one has to say the bible is virtually silent The Bible does not identify Abram's mother, only his father. Gen 11:26-27 Now Terah lived seventy years, and begot Abram, Nahor, and Haran.This is the genealogy of Terah: Terah begot Abram, Nahor, and ...


4

The text at hand is as follows: The transliterated phrase is literally "for not-salem (שָׁלֵ֛ם) avon (עֲוֹ֥ן) the Amorites yet is here", and so the meaning really hinges on those words salem and awon. Salem / שָׁלֵ֛ם / 8003 This is essentially an adjective form of 'shalom', applying a concept of wholeness, fullness or completeness to its paired noun. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible