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... for the Christ to suffer these things and enter into his glory? Only the Gospel of Luke has the narration of the encounter between the resurrected Jesus and the disciples at Emmaus (Luke 24:13-35). Central to this account is that Jesus explains to the two disciples how the life, suffering and death of the Messiah were inscribed in "all the ...


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It is very common in the idiomatic Hebrew theology to depict passive works using passive verbs. Faith and repentance are things solely depended upon man's heart, otherwise God wouldn't have given the whole law and plead the believers to repent (Ezekiel 18 and 33). Understanding the idioms and figures of speech are the key to hermeneutics. The reason for ...


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Conditions for Repentance The word "perhaps" or "may" in 2Tim 2:25 and other similar passages signify hope or prayer. Paul is hopeful that if they sincerely turn from the heresies and unrighteousness or iniquities, and seek spirituality, truth, godliness, they will succeed in repenting. Regarding repentance, see Ezekiel 18 and 33. [NASB ...


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This question and the passage in question (2 Tim 2:22-26) bring to mind the parable of the fig tree: And He began telling this parable: “A man had a fig tree which had been planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and did not find any. 7 And he said to the vineyard-keeper, ‘Look! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig ...


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Does God grant repentence conditionally (2 Tim. 2:25)? Answer: Yes. We must adhere to the Gospel. Note the last two passages in the OP: 2 Timothy 2:25b-26: "God may perhaps grant them repentance... [and] they may come to their senses and escape from the snare of the devil, after being captured by him to do his will." Paul is admonishing those who ...


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According to Alexander Buttmann,1 Sometimes in Greek a clause placed after a leading clause is yet to be regarded as dependent on a verbum sentiendi understood... Several corresponding constructions connected with various conjunctions are found in the N.T., commonly with the Subjunctive or the Future in its stead, in Luke (after historical tenses) with the ...


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