24

The answer to the question does not lie in the statement but in the time/period. The first time Jesus was sent into the world His duty was to spread the Word of God to all men and not to judge anyone: For God did not send the Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world might be saved through Him. “He who believes in Him is not judged; he who ...


16

The events of Act 15 are dated to AD 48. It is worth noting that Paul and Barnabas solved the immediate problem in a good way. When compromise was impossible ("I want X," "Not a chance"), they parted ways. This also wasn't the first time that Paul and Barnabas had disagreed on how to operate. Galatians 2:12 Until certain people came from ...


14

The question sets out nicely the way in which Paul's broken relationship with Mark was healed and later flourished -- with, it seems, a new depth of character in Mark. Was it, one wonders, a case of Mark growing as a result of the relational trauma with Paul? There are, however, fewer "dots" to "connect" in the case of Paul's relationship with Barnabas, his ...


10

1. Question Restatement: If God really is "All Powerful", then why can't he deny himself? Or, is 2 Timothy 2:13 actually saying that God "will/would not" deny himself - even though he can? ESV, 2 Timothy 2:13 - if we are faithless, he remains faithful— for he cannot deny [contradict] himself. This question appears to be related to ...


9

2 Tim 4:16-18 At my first defense no one stood with me, but all forsook me. May it not be charged against them. But the Lord stood with me and strengthened me, so that the message might be preached fully through me, and that all the Gentiles might hear. Also I was delivered out of the mouth of the lion. And the Lord will deliver me from every evil work and ...


9

Suppose a lorry carries a load up a hill; we can say the lorry is responsible for taking the the load up the hill. But then we can say, no, actually the lorry was not responsible, it was the the driver who was responsible. Then we can say actually it wasn't the driver but God who sustains all things. [Heb 1:3 He upholds the universe]. The lorry is an ...


9

Knowing nothing about how people fished 2,000 years ago, I went to my Atlas of the Bible to find out more about it. The Sea of Galilee, also known as the Lake of Gennesaret, is almost 700 feet below sea level and is about 14 miles long and 6 miles wide. Great storms can arise suddenly and put the lives of fishermen at risk. The fishing nets would be ...


8

I do not like this proposed rule for several reasons, apart from the fact that it is confusing and misleading and never required. If the rule is correct (which I doubt) then John 20:28 is a clear exception. I cannot find an instance of where the Apostolic Fathers suggested that part of John 20:28 is addressed to God the Father rather than entirely to Jesus ...


6

The key of this text is the phrase that day, which occurs in the following three verses: 2 Tim 1:16-18 (NASB) 16 The Lord grant mercy to the house of Onesiphorus, for he often refreshed me and was not ashamed of my chains; 17 but when he was in Rome, he eagerly searched for me and found me— 18the Lord grant to him to find mercy from the Lord on that day—...


6

The evidence strongly suggests that when New Testament authors refer to scripture, or say "it is written", they are referring to pre-Christian Jewish sacred writings and not what is now the New Testament. The one possible exception is the author of 2 Peter. (I hesitate to say "Hebrew Bible" for three reasons. First, most of them use the Septuagint ...


6

The pre-Pauline references to the brother magicians are rare. Other answers draw attention to the mention of the names by Pliny in his Natural History (XXX.1.11). This was published at the end of the 70s, however, and so is only evidence that the names were current by Paul's time. There was a theory that the second century BCE Jewish historian Artapanus, ...


5

This text consists of five imperatives: κήρυξον τὸν λόγον, | kēryxon ton logon | (Preach the Word) ἐπίστηθι εὐκαίρως ἀκαίρως, | epistēthi eukairōs akairōs | (be ready in season [and] out of season) ἔλεγξον, | elenxon | (reprove) ἐπιτίμησον, | epitimēson | (rebuke) παρακάλεσον, | parakaleson | (exhort) ἐν πάσῃ μακροθυμίᾳ καὶ διδαχῇ. | en pasē makrothymia ...


5

The word ἄρτιος (artios) is not found elsewhere in the New Testament or the Septuagint, but it is reasonably well-attested in Classical Greek literature; LSJ provides many examples. BDAG gives: pertaining to being well fitted for some function, complete, capable, proficient = able to meet all demands Although the word is a hapax within the Greek Bible, ...


5

The key phrase you are asking about is ἀρνήσασθαι ἑαυτὸν οὐ δύναται, translated by the ESV and most other versions as he cannot deny himself. The phrase being translated here as cannot is οὐ δύναται - ou dynatai. The word οὐ indicates negation. The word δύναται is the present tense of δύναμαι (dynamai), but the voice here could be interpreted as either "...


5

Will the King of kings Judge? You can count upon it. If He didn't, He would be the first king that didn't judge. Jesus is the King of kings and LORD of lords. When will He judge? In His times--future times per 1 Ti 6:12-15, KJV: Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, whereunto thou art also called, and hast professed a good profession ...


5

These statements are not contradictory but are referring to different things. When Jesus says he did not come to judge, he is referring to the purpose for which he was sent into the world. “God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him” (Jn 3:17). If we stand back and look at Jesus' ...


5

Maybe not a specific (or good) answer, but: anyone who reads Scripture will find hundreds of contradictions. The takeaway is that Scripture was intended to instruct, not intended to be taken word-for-word literally. Before I became a Christian, I delighted in these contradictions. It was evidence to my naive mind that Scripture was untrustworthy. Once I ...


5

The problem with the Unitarian position is that it attempts to create a special meta-narrative by which it then makes special pleadings for verses that are troublesome. Thus, any "theory" about the nature of God must be jealously guarded against this very human problem. The Trinity and Arianism are NOT immune to this. The difficulty with ...


4

According to Pliny's natural history, in discussing the origin of magic in the world he mentions Jannes in relation to Moses. There is another sect, also, of adepts in the magic art, who derive their origin from Moses, Jannes, and Lotapea,Jews by birth, but many thousand years posterior to Zoroaster: and as much more recent, again, is the branch of magic ...


4

Clearly, Paul did expect Timothy to see the "last days". That, and other similar phrases in the NT refer to the last days of the old creation. Note the context of the "new heavens and new earth" passage in Isaiah. God talking to Israel: Behold, my servants shall eat, But you shall be hungry; Behold, my servants shall drink, But you shall be thirsty; ... ...


4

As already noted, the LXX is the best place to start, since the Greek word ὀρθοτομέω only occurs once in the Greek New Testament (hapax legomenon). The below verses compare the Greek LXX with the Hebrew MT, which will point us to the Hebrew words. In turn, we will look at the Hebrew words. Proverbs 3:6 (MT) בְּכָל־דְּרָכֶיךָ דָעֵהוּ וְהוּא יְיַשֵּׁר ...


4

I think that we need to understand firstly that Paul is contrasting Onesiphorus and his household with those people he mentions in v14. He is commending them for their care of him. The fact that it is just Onesiphorus' household that Paul speaks of in v15 and not Onesiphorus himself suggests that he wasn't there at the time. That might mean that he was ...


4

The Greek text of 2 Tim. 1:3 according to Robert Estienne’s Textus Receptus (1550) states, Χάριν ἔχω τῷ θεῷ ᾧ λατρεύω ἀπὸ προγόνων ἐν καθαρᾷ συνειδήσει ὡς ἀδιάλειπτον ἔχω τὴν περὶ σοῦ μνείαν ἐν ταῖς δεήσεσίν μου νυκτὸς καὶ ἡμέρας On the Greek word πρόγονος, Christian Gottlob Wilke (translated by Joseph Henry Thayer) wrote,1 πρό-γονος, -ου, ὁ, (προγίνομαι),...


4

John 12:47 “If anyone hears my words but does not keep them, I do not judge that person. For I did not come to judge the world, but to save the world. 48There is a judge for the one who rejects me and does not accept my words; the very words I have spoken will condemn them at the last day. 49For I did not speak on my own, but the Father who sent me commanded ...


3

Some good questions to answer before exegeting the passage you've quoted include the following: What is the time frame indicated? Is it now or at some time in the future when this reigning will take place? Who are the "we" in the passage? Is the "reigning" in this passage related to Jesus' announcement of the "Kingdom of God" ...


3

2 Tim 4:2 and Titus 1:3 both have τὸν λόγον (ton logon) in Greek. The decision whether to caplitalize or not is wholly down to the instinct of the editors of that particular translation. It is worth noting, too, that this is a "luxury" of English: not every language system as the same lower-, upper-case distinctions that modern English does. What the ...


3

Exactly as others have said: these names appear in Jewish non-biblical tradition, specifically in the Targum of Pseudo-Jonathan to Exodus 7:11, as well as in later Hellenistic sources (like Josephus). Martin McNamara discusses it here, and there is a lengthy discussion of the Jewish and Greek sources here as well (page 1-71). As Frank Luke noted in a comment,...


3

Background A εὐαγγελιστής ("evangelist") is one who proclaims some piece of εὐαγγέλιον ("good news").1 The latter word is derived as a noun from the verb εὐαγγελίζω ("to announce good news"). The word family comes from a compounding of the Greek adverb εὖ ("pert[aining] to that which is good or beneficial") and the verb ἀγγέλλω ("to announce").2 Core "...


3

As you have asked me to elaborate, so I will: the impossibility both for God to lie (ψεύσασθαι) and God's Son to fall from faithfulness (ἀπιστεύειν) is semantically one and the same ontological impossibility (for the ἀδύνατον Hebrews 6:18 has absolutely the same power as the οὐ δύναται of the 2 Tim. 2:13, thus asserting the same degree of steadfastness (...


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