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The Hebrew חָכָם (chakam) occurs about 137 times in the OT and is variously translated: "wise" Gen 41:8, 33, 39, Ex 7:11, etc "skilful", Ex 28:3, 31:6, 35:10, 25, etc "cunning" 2 Chron 2:13, 14 "shrewd", 2 Sam 13:3 "wise hearted", Prov 11:29 More exhaustively, the word is translated (NASB): expert (1), men who are skillful (1), sage (1), shrewd (2), ...


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2 Samuel 12:8 And I gave you your master's house, and your master's wives into your bosom, and gave you the house of Israel and of Judah; and if that had been too little, I would moreover have given to you such and such things. Why does God not just permit but seemingly encourage David's polygamy in 2 Samuel 12:8? David was favored by God. He gave him many ...


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There is no doubt that polygamy was common in Israel; Elkannah, David, Solomon, Saul, Abraham, Jacob, etc, etc. In 2 Sam 12:8 we find that - I gave your master’s house to you and your master’s wives into your arms. I gave you the house of Israel and Judah, and if that was not enough, I would have given you even more. Thus, among other things, God claims ...


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Monogamy is nice, but polygamy is nicer. But can you really afford it? That's the real question. Kings had many wives and concubines because "it's great to be the king". What is NOT nice is when a king with many wives intrudes upon not only the property rites of a good man but also upon the intimate nuances of a man whose devotion to God, King and ...


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The context here has to do with David's lust for more women. Not quite. The context has to do with sending someone to their death, so that one could then proceed to marry their widowed wife. Just as anything ranging from simple theft to aggravated robbery is forbidden by the Mosaic Law, but the pursuit of wealth is not (provided that the poor, the widows, ...


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Ignore David's reasons for fleeing the stronghold for the moment. There are two possible scenarios, flee or defending in Jerusalem. With hindsight, we see the outcomes of fleeing are way better than staying and defending Jerusalem as pointed out in Dottard's answer. The rebellion was finished in a matters of days instead of months, even years. By hindsight, ...


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David was no fool - as well as an effective general he was a wise and able political ruler. In ancient times as well as today, politics involves the unstated "social contract" between the government and the people - the people give loyalty and some powers/.freedoms to the government and the government protects the people. That is, the government ...


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David is justified (in God's sight) which causes him to be blameless (in God's sight). It is God that justifieth, who is he that condemneth ? [Romans 8:33 KJV] Although not a cause of boasting, but rather a cause of humility, it is still the case that when God justifies, one is justified. For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves:...


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To the fine answer of Abu Munir Ibn Ibrahim – which I’m agree with - I wish to add only some enriching (I hope) information I’ve found in some classic commentaries (bold is mine). Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge: “and put them*: **Rather, as the particle ב frequently signifies, ‘And he put them to saws, and to harrows, and to axes,’ etc., as we say, to ...


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The KJV for II Samuel 12:31 does not say what you think it does, and there is no support for what you think the KJV is saying in the MT. In particular, the KJV does not say that David hacked anyone with saws, raked them with harrows, burned them alive, or anything like that. This is not John Barleycorn. In fact, the KJV does not differ much from the NIV for ...


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There is a parallel account recorded in 1 Chronicles 15:25 So David and the elders of Israel and the commanders of units of a thousand went to bring up the ark of the covenant of the Lord from the house of Obed-Edom, with rejoicing. 26 Because God had helped the Levites who were carrying the ark of the covenant of the Lord, seven bulls and seven rams were ...


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