25

This is about ritual purity, not moral purity. According to Leviticus 15:19-30, a woman is unclean during her monthly period, until 7 days have passed. It may be as simple as she had been on her period, but the time had passed so that David would not be unclean if he had relations with her. Leviticus 15:1924,28-30 NIV 19 “‘When a woman has her regular ...


21

The question is a good one, and worth discussing. My own sense is that it includes a mis-step, however, which casts a different light on things. My short answer to the question posed ("how does 'foot washing' lead to the act of 'sexual intercourse'?") is: it doesn't! First, though, to pick up a point made in a comment to the question. "Feet" as a euphemism ...


15

As a commenter notes, there is a text-critical issue here. The Masoretic Text of the Hebrew Bible plainly reads "Michal" at this point. However, as the textual notes to the Biblia Hebraica Stuttargtensia indicate, there are two Hebrew manuscripts that read "Merob", and there is some support for this among Septuagint manuscripts, too: P. Kyle McCarter ...


11

Not a Hyperbolic Expression The Text of Psalm 51:4: לְךָ לְבַדְּךָ ׀ חָטָאתִי וְהָרַע בְּעֵינֶיךָ עָשִׂיתִי לְמַעַן תִּצְדַּק בְּדָבְרֶךָ תִּזְכֶּה בְשָׁפְטֶֽךָ׃ Explanation 1) "Against you alone" (לְךָ לְבַדְּךָ): This is a prayer of David for repentance (a penitential psalm), and while he sinned against many others in the affair with Bathsheba, ...


10

Scholarly opinion is that the additional sentence in the Latin translation of 2 Sam 1:26 (Sicut mater unicum amat filium suum, ita ego te diligebam) is a mediaeval interpolation; that is to say: it was added by a mediaeval copyist and was not in Jerome's original text. The purpose of the interpolation is obviously to avoid any possibly homoerotic reading of ...


9

Excellent question. Let's explore some explanations. 1) The first explanation is simply that they were indeed unlawful priests (c.f. Judges 17). 2) That the text would mention this transgression without consequence seems strange to many commentators who propose a second explanation - that the word "priest" here means "advisor". Let's examine a textual ...


9

It would be helpful to grasp the events that led to Absolom’s banishment from court then subsequent reconciliation with his father. These events are recorded in 2 Samuel 13 and 14. Absolom returned to Hebron, where David was first proclaimed King and where Absolom was born. The NIV Study Bible makes this comment: Absolom may have had reason to believe ...


8

I am no dancer, but I don't believe the context can support Mr. Garlock's interpretation: The word in question (karar), is defined by BDB as "to whirl, to dance". However, since the word is only used twice (here and in v. 16), we shouldn't place too much confidence in the lexical precision. Rather, it is the context that clarifies what was going on. In ...


7

While it is true that David was a man after God's own heart, he was also a man who had no scruples about killing. Take, most famously, as an example, Uriah. Uriah was killed for the grievous offense of having a hot wife! In the case of Joab, it was a political revenge killing, pure and simple. David says in 1 Kings 2: 5 “Now you yourself know what Joab ...


7

For the phrase in question, the Hebrew text states וְהִיא מִתְקַדֶּשֶׁת מִטֻּמְאָתָהּ (vehiy mitkaddeshet mitumʿatah). To note, the Hebrew text lacks the conjunction כִּי (ki); therefore, translating this Hebrew phrase into English with an initial “for” is untenable. Since there is no “for,” the author is not providing the reason that David laid with her. ...


6

What an excellent question! Aaron had four sons: two died an early death with no survivors, and the other two sons survived:-- Eleazar and Ithamar. Thus the Levites who served as priests at the time of David are all descended from one of these two priestly lines. In the Hebrew Bible, when we see the Ahimelech(father)/Abiathar(son) team, these two are the ...


6

The Idea in Brief The area in question appears to be in the frontal abdominal area directly below the sternum--i.e., the so-called "gut." Discussion The Babylonian Talmud indicates that the "fifth rib" was the junction point of the gall bladder and liver. b. Sanhedrin 6:4n (Folio 49A) F. He said to him, “Now if at exactly the fifth rib he had ...


6

As part of my secular job (I'm a Respiratory Therapist), I do EKG's (aka ECG's and cardiograms) on people. EKG leads V1-V6 are ventricular - the 2 larger pumping chambers of the bottom portion of the heart - leads. Lead V5 is placed in the left 5th intercostal space between the 5th & 6th (below the 5th and above the sixth) ribs, and would be most ...


6

Family Relation Absalom was the son of Maacah (2 Sam 3:3), while Amnon was the son of Ahinoam (2 Sam 3:2), both by David, so they were half-brothers. Tamar is said to be explicitly Absalom's sister (2 Sam 13:1, 32), in a way that Amnon recognizes she is not to him (2 Sam 13:4); yet she is viewed still as all the brothers' sister (1 Chr 3:9), as David ...


5

There are two, possibly inter-related, issues here. One is the preposition expected with the root mlk in the hifil; the other is the relationship between the prepositions ʾel and ʿal. 1. MLK + ?? Typically the verb mlk takes the preposition ʿal, "rule over", and in the Hifil it appears so on at least six occasions (1 Sam. 12:1; 2 Ki. 8:20; 1 Chr. 28:4; 2 ...


5

איך נפלו גבורים ויאבדו כלי מלחמה In this verse there is - patently - a synonymic parallelism. Besides the first term (איך), that is (in this context) an interjection of astonishment, the rest of the verse is composed inside a parallelism structure. Ah! The powerful (men) [גבורים] fell [נפלו] and the war instruments [כלי מלחמה] perished [ויאבדו]! Like we ...


4

The verse is not Proverbs 18:8, but Proverbs 8:8, which states Proverbs 8:8 (NASB) 8 All the utterances of my mouth are in righteousness; There is nothing crooked or perverted in them. The Hebrew word for "crooked" is Hebrew verb פָּתַל, which means "to twist." That is, this word is the Niphal participle, which means "twisted" (or crooked), and is ...


4

First, remember that David was king, and as king he answered to no one but G-d. He could have ordered Uriah killed on whatever pretext and then taken Bat-Sheva. He had that authority. Instead, what he did was rely on the fact that Jewish soldiers going into battle are required to give their wives conditional retroactive divorce papers which in effect say: ...


4

Saul and Ahinoam - 6 children: Jonathan -> Mephibosheth - Mica - etc. Ishui (Abinadab) Melchishua Ishbosheth (Eshbaal) Merab (f) (eldest) - [five children by Adriel] Michal (f) - wife of David x2. (Michal raised Merab's children for some reason.) Saul and Rizpah (concubine) - [Armoni and Mephibosheth] So, David gave over to the Gibeonites the five ...


3

Exodus 12:23 uses the term ham-mas-hit to name "the destroyer." An interesting verse rarely used here and almost never translated is Isaiah 54:16 which states that YHWH (the Lord) created the Destroyer (Mas-hit) Himself for a specific purpose. The identity of the Destroyer with Apollyon has some merit as, like in Exodus, it can only hurt those not sealed ...


3

The NET Bible tackles both of these statements in their translation and notes. 51:4 Against you – you above all – I have sinned; I have done what is evil in your sight. So you are just when you confront me; you are right when you condemn me. *1. They state the phrase "against you only" is hyperbole as the word used here for sin is indeed used in ...


3

According to the Me'am Lo'ez, some explain the behavior by reference to the following law: if a fast is decreed due to a lack of rainfall, then when it rains, the people should stop fasting. But, if an individual fasts for someone who is ill, and that person recovers, he still must complete that fast (through sundown). In the latter case, there is still a ...


3

If memory serves, in just about every part of the ancient world, a woman who had previously been married to a king (either in full, with the status of wife, or de facto in the lesser status of concubine) could not be remarried to anyone except another king. Remember also that legal rights of a woman were reckoned through her husband, and that divorced women ...


3

The LXX Greek translation of Hebrew transliteration for destroyer in Exodus 12:23 (hammashit) is olethreyonta, a different word from appollyon. Hebrew abbaddon is not used in Exodus 12:23. Isaiah 37:36 may provide additional context.


3

Your question seems to be "How is this possible?" as a question of total incredulity, that a godly man like David could fall into such a sin. I'll come back to this. Your next question is, "Why would a woman bathe before the king's royal palace or somewhere a king could see her?" She may have assumed that since the army was out to war, ...


3

The phrase "covenant of salt" is likely used as a figure of speech in II Chronicles 13:4-5 to indicate an everlasting covenant rather than as a specific reference to the covenant of Aaron. The classical commentators suggest that the metaphor "covenant of salt" originated from the well known use of salt as a preservative. See also Leviticus 2:13. Abijah is ...


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