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1

The answer to this depends on which prediction in 2 Peter 3:3-13 one wishes to discuss. Let me enumerate them: V3, 4 - scoffers who assert uniformitarianism (as distinct from catastrophism as taught in the the Bible, eg, the flood, V5-7) - this doctrine was first officially propounded by James Hutton in the 18th century and has had significant influence ...


1

They are partially fulfilled. However, the part of the prophecy that most people see in this passage is as the tip of the iceberg: there is a trove beneath the surface. For those interested in doing a little digging into the treasure of 2 Peter 3:1-13, I would point out the following clues to get started: Notice what Peter speaks of in verse 4: "...


0

Is there any interpretative room for the predictions of 2 Peter 3:3ff as fulfilled? Answer: Yes, and No. I. Yes, Peter states that scoffers will point out the delay in the Lord's return. The scoffers have a valid point. II. God is eternal. As you noted in the OP, "with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day" (v8). ...


0

Yes, Christians that in full understanding accept God's holy spirit and then later reject it are worse off than if they'd never heard the name Jesus. Those that die ignorant of the truth will be given their opportunity for salvation following the second general resurrection: But the rest of the dead did not live again until the thousand years were finished. ...


3

The short answer to the question is, "YES". It is possible for someone to loose their salvation, both according to 2 Peter 2:20-22 and many others. Here is a sample: King Saul who was a statesman and prophet called by God (1 Sam 10:11, 12, 19:24), yet was ultimately lost when he consulted demons for advice and then committed suicide. Ps 69:28 ...


2

You will find strong Bible believing Christians arguing on either side. A view that settles the conflict within the scriptures is God knows who is saved and will endure to the end, but people can be mistaken about being saved and can turn away. We say the Sun rises and sets, but that is only from our point of view. It is the Earth that rotates, not the ...


12

Can a person lose their salvation according to 2 Peter 2:20-22? The short answer is "Yes, most definitely." The following response may be unpalatable to some. However, it is certainly not my intent to wound those who believe we simply cannot be lost once we receive salvation in Christ. The far greater imperative here is for the truth to be told, ...


3

Yes, of course, how otherwise? Moreover, it will be even worse for that person for "a servant who knows the will of his lord will be beaten more than a servant who does not know it" (cf. Luke 12:47). To claim, upon a wrongheaded interpretation of 1 Corinthians 3:15, that a person who has been enlightened by Holy Baptism and has become a Christian ...


1

The name Συμεών (Sumeón or Symeón) occurs only seven times in the NT: Luke 2:25, 34 - Simeon the prophet Luke 3:30 - an ancestor of Jesus Acts 13:1 - a Christian at Antioch Acts 15:14, 2 Peter 1:1 - the apostle, Peter Rev 7:7 - the ancient tribe of Israel Peter's other name was also spelled Σίμων (Simón) in most places such as Matt 4:18, 16:16, 17:25; ...


1

This is covenant language - all the divine covenants of the OT consisted of a series of covenant blessings (see appendix below). These New Covenant promises are often discussed in the NT: Gal 3:29 - “If you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise”. Paul makes the same point in Rom 9:6-9, 11:11-22. 1 Peter 2:9, 10 -...


2

John 1: 12 But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, even to those who believe in His name, 13who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God. Jesus promised us to become children of God, born of God. 1 Peter 1 echos this sentiment: 23 For you have been born again, not of ...


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