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14

Peter is urging his audience to regard God as 'patient' in regard to bringing about the conclusion of His plan, rather than 'slow', and not to doubt His eventual arrival. The 'scoffers' of earlier in the chapter are questioning whether God[1] will return at all, given the apparent delay: 3knowing this first of all, that scoffers will come in the last ...


14

Can a person lose their salvation according to 2 Peter 2:20-22? The short answer is "Yes, most definitely." The following response may be unpalatable to some. However, it is certainly not my intent to wound those who believe we simply cannot be lost once we receive salvation in Christ. The far greater imperative here is for the truth to be told, ...


11

The term in question is μακροθυμία, elsewhere translated "patience" or "endurance". (See also the related adjective μακρόθυμος and the verb μακροθυμέω). The term is barely attested in pre-Jewish Greek literature (only once in a fragmentary remain from the 4th C. comic Menander1), but is rather common in both its nominal and verbal forms in the LXX and, ...


7

I believe it would be impossible to give a dogmatic answer on this. However, there are a number of interesting connections to Paul's letters worth considering. What to Look For First we need to establish what to look for. Namely the concept stated in the first part of 2 Pet 3:15: Καὶ τὴν τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν μακροθυμίαν - σωτηρίαν ἡγεῖσθε And the (...


6

The angels mentioned earlier in 2 Peter are evil1 Angels are only explicitly mentioned twice in 2 Peter. The other mention is near the start of the same logical section in verse 4: 4For if God did not spare angels when they sinned, but cast them into hell and committed them to chains of gloomy darkness to be kept until the judgment; ESV If these angels ...


6

From the link posted by Paul Vargas, found here: Our restatement of Sharp’s rule is believed to be true to the nature of the language, and able to address all classes of exceptions that Winstanley raised. The “Sharper” rule is as follows: _ In native Greek constructions (i.e., not translation Greek), when a single article modifies two ...


6

"Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished:" (2 Peter 3:6 KJV) The key word here is "perished". No one died from a flood before Noah's day. The scripture at Gen. 1:1 describes the earth as being "empty" so there were no people to destroy with floodwater. Also if we look at the context of Peter's ...


6

The anarthrous ποιοῦντες (v. 10) is functioning as a circumstantial participle which can be translated into English in a variety of ways,1 including means2 (“by doing”) and condition3 (“if you do”). The majority of English translations apparently interpret it as a conditional. Footnotes         1 Smyth, pp. 456–459, §§ 2054–2069         2 id., p. 458, § ...


5

While the preceding verse (5) makes reference to Genesis 1:2, verse 6 itself is referring to the flood of Noah's time, note the connecting word 'later' in the CEV (a version produced by the American Bible society): 5 They will say this because they want to forget that long ago the heavens and the earth were made at God’s command. The earth came out of ...


5

A Contrary Argument: Seeing the Reference as to Good Angels Jack Douglas laid out some good points to argue for 1 Pet 2:11 to be evil angels. However, I do find some holes and things left unconsidered that for me seem to point to a contrary conclusion. The following is loosely based off both his original set of arguments offered, as well as some of his ...


5

Peace with God bringing Peace within Self Ideas one and three are both present in the context. Peace with God will bring the inner peace, which is the primary focus of the word here. Expand the context to see how this works in 2 Peter 3 (ESV): 9 The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing ...


5

A 'hypostatic union' is a specific term used in Christian theology to describe the trinity. It is meant simply to state that a being can have different persons under a same essence. In the incarnation, it is less frequently used but then means a being, a Unity, the Christ, exists as a single person 'under' which two distinct natures exist, human and divine. ...


5

Not Personalities, but God's Glorious Gifts Of δόξας (doxas) v.10 The Greek of 2 Pet 2:10 μάλιστα δὲ τοὺς ὀπίσω σαρκὸς ἐν ἐπιθυμίᾳ μιασμοῦ πορευομένους, καὶ κυριότητος καταφρονοῦντας. Τολμηταί, αὐθάδεις, δόξας οὐ τρέμουσιν βλασφημοῦντες The part in question is the second clause where the accusative noun δόξας is the direct object of what is being "...


5

In this section of 2 Peter, sinful angels are being both compared and contrasted with 'false teachers', who are really the subject of the passage. The NET Bible notes that: Δόξας (doxas) almost certainly refers to angelic beings rather than mere human authorities, though it is difficult to tell whether good or bad angels are in view. Verse 11 seems to ...


5

From Wikipedia, the Papyri containing 2 Peter are: P72 (circa 300, also contains 1 Peter, Jude, and several apocryphal writings) P74 (circa 650, missing chapter 1, also contains Acts, 1 Peter, and 1-3 John) The Uncials containing 2 Peter are 4th century: א, B 5th century: A, 048. 6th century: 0156 (Chapter 3), 0247 (Chapter 1) 7th century: 0209 9th ...


5

It's widely understood that the flood overtook all that had breath on earth, in what sense that Peter include the 'heavens' in the phrase 'the heavens and the earth, which are now' if the heavens didn't 'perish' with the world which was then? Yes, there is a clear implication in this passage that the destruction of the flood was in some sense universal, ...


5

So if we try to understand Scripture from a traditional sense the Bible doesn't exactly make sense. So in order to understand Scripture accurately we have to allow the Scripture itself to interpret Scripture, rather than traditional religious beliefs. For The Hebrew text we have three locations mentioned, Sheol, Theum and Hinnom. In the Greek we know these ...


5

Yes, of course, how otherwise? Moreover, it will be even worse for that person for "a servant who knows the will of his lord will be beaten more than a servant who does not know it" (cf. Luke 12:47). To claim, upon a wrongheaded interpretation of 1 Corinthians 3:15, that a person who has been enlightened by Holy Baptism and has become a Christian ...


4

The phrase "of Scripture" here is intended to distinguish between prophecies belonging to Scripture and prophecies belonging to the false prophets who are excoriated beginning in 2 Peter 2:1. The genitive "of Scripture" can be taken to mean: "prophecy about Scripture" (similar to the form "a prophecy of Jesus' death") "prophecy belonging to Scripture" (...


4

Textual Analysis (My Argument) Contrasting Mere Believers from what Believers are Called to Become I believe the context answers this: v.1 The difference is established in v.1, but it is not "us apostles" and "you (who have obtained a faith of equal standing with ours)." Rather, it is setting up a contrast between "servants [δοῦλος (doúlos)]", willing ...


4

Peter isn't merely saying that Paul uses the word longsuffering frequently. He is referring to Paul's themes along these lines. And not only the theme of God's patience, but the others he has been writing about: A. God's patience in finally fulfilling his promises (v9a): "The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is ...


4

Firstly, the link supplied to an article by Gregory Blunt appears to me to show that Blunt is arguing against Daniel B Wallace's treatment of the article : However, it will be demonstrated that a consistent treatment of the article as pronoun, described by Middleton, and anaphora with respect to "individualizing articles" as described by Daniel Wallace ...


4

Overview 1 Peter, a servant and apostle of Jesus Christ, To those who have obtained a faith of equal standing with ours by the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ: 2 May grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord. (2 Peter 1:1-2) [ESV] 1 Συμεὼν Πέτρος δοῦλος καὶ ἀπόστολος Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῖς ...


4

The English verb “suffer” has several meanings. In 2 Peter 3:9, it is used in the now obsolete sense of:1 intransitive. To endure, hold out, wait patiently. (Often with abide, bide.) to suffer long: to be long-suffering. Obsolete. In modern English, we could translate it as “is patient.” Yes, both “to be longsuffering” (now obsolete) and “to be patient” ...


4

I am a firm believer that the clear texts explain the less clear. I have listed a sample of texts showing that Christ's salvation is available to all and (in that sense) universal in the Appendix 1 below. This is NOT to suggest that all will be saved; far from it. Many will choose to reject that salvation. The question really should be asked, if God's ...


4

Peter 2:4 when did the angels sin? In the days of Noah before the flood. The Bible tells us that "God’s Grief over Humankind’s wickedness" in the days of Noah before the flood, the account states that the sons of God took for themselves wives from the attractive daughters of mankind. In verse 3 we read, "nevertheless his days shall be 120 ...


4

We begin by noting the obvious that the document called "2 Peter" is either a pseudepigraphon (a forgery) or it is not. The argument against the authenticity of 2 Peter essentially rests on three observations: A few (admittedly significant) antenicaean father express doubts such as Origen; Eusebius (Ecclesiastical History vi 25, iii 3); Jerome, ...


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