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12

Regarding "key differences": When one battles, one has also encountered - no issue. When one engages, one has also met - no issue. When one is said to have been killed "by" a commander of troops, that does not mean one was necessarily killed directly by that commander. It can just as easily have been by the troops that were under his command. For example, ...


11

This is indeed a fascinating and cryptic statement... As was pointed out in a comment on the question, this phrase actually occurs twice: earlier, as Elijah was ascending to heaven, Elisha sees "a chariot of fire and horses of fire" (II Kings 2:11), and then cries out, "My father, my father! The chariot[s] of Israel and its horsemen!". Biblical scholars and ...


11

Frankly, I also searched for but couldn’t find much of others addressing the parallels of Ruth and Elisha. Walfish was almost always the writer. What I did find were mostly studies of one book that had cross references to the other(s) (e.g. Ruth noting a Kings book or vice versa). For some other material I found, see the comment at the bottom of this ...


11

Before anything, though, I must say that no, king Joash would not know that he must strike the ground five or six times. But, he really should have did that. All verse emphasis mine. First of all, we would have to look at the reason why Elisha would be angry at an answer to a seemingly minuscule command, 2 Kings 13:14 (NKJV) 14 Elisha had become sick with ...


11

וַיֹּאמְרוּ אֵלָיו אִישׁ בַּ֣עַל שֵׂעָ֔ר וְאֵזוֹר עוֹר אָזוּר בְּמָתְנָיו The Hebrew of interest here is baʿal śēʿār, a "lord of hair". This falls into the use of baʿal described in HALOT 4, s.v. בַּעַל:1 status word: בַּעַל indicates the owner of an object which embodies his manner, his character or his occupation The use of the term "owner" seems to ...


10

The Idea in Brief According to the Hebrew Bible, there are at least two people who have ascended into heaven: Enoch and Elijah. In the Christian New Testament, Jesus made the emphatic statement that no one (οὐδεὶς) had ever ascended into heaven with the exception of the one who had descended from heaven: that is, Jesus himself, who was to be "lifted up" ...


8

The New American Bible, in note 4 to 2 Kings chapter 3, does initially attribute this triumph to the god Chemosh. However, the New American Bible then suggests an alternative, monotheistic explanation, which inevitably recognises the polytheistic beliefs of the early Israelites and their belief in the efficacy of child sacrifice: The wrath against Israel:...


7

The “Book of the Law” is a common phrase that refers to the book of Deuteronomy as an expansion of the Moral Law, or Covenant Law based around the 10 Commandments. “Book of the Law” is referenced in Deut 28:61, 29:21, 30:10, 31:26, Josh 1:8, 8:31, 34, 24:26, 2 Kings 22:8, 11, 2 Chron 17:9, 25:4, 34:14, 15, Neh 8:1-3, 8, 18, 9:3 (and 17:18). The Book of ...


7

Deuteronomy refers to itself as the Book of the Law, 31:26 Take this Book of the Law and place it beside the ark of the covenant of the LORD your God. There it will remain as a witness against you. Josiah's grandfather Manasseh did evil in the eyes of the Lord (2 Kings 21:2). He built altars in the temple of the Lord (verse 4). It was probably at this ...


6

The location of Gilgal is crucial in this response - the Gilgal mentioned in the battles of Joshua is most likely not the same location as that mentioned in the travels of Elijah and Elisha. The maps below show the different proposed locations of each. Map showing travels of Elijah and Elisha: Map showing battles of Jericho and Ai: According to the Jewish ...


5

Interesting answers... Looking at the Hebrew (and some other translations), I would hazard that another accurate translation would be something like: Thus says Hizqiyyahu: This day is a day of distress, and of reproach, and of disgrace. For the children have come to the moment of breaking, but there is not enough strength for birthing. So it's not a ...


4

The phenomenon described in II Kings 3:20-23 is well known in the area. Rain can fall in the higher areas such as Edom (now Jordan) or in the Judean hills while down in the Jordan valley on either side of the river, the sky is clear and sunny. When this happens, the wadis (gulleys) that drain the uplands erupt suddenly in flash floods that endanger ...


4

It's a proverbial expression but can be understood at face value. If a mother doesn't have the strength to deliver her child, it becomes a very dangerous situation for both her and the child. This would certainly be a cause for distress, as the child and mother are likely to die (or the mother is already dead). In this context it means they are in great ...


4

The Hebrew word translated as "bald" as in II Kings 2v23 is used in only one other place in the Old Testament: Lev 13:40 And the man whose hair is fallen off his head, he is bald; yet is he clean. This is clearly referring to male-pattern baldness and not a shaved head which was associated with taking a vow (e.g. the Nazarite in Num 6.) Apart from ...


4

I found some interesting conenctions between the two: Both Ruth and Elisha are forceful and determined. Ruth "clung" to Naomi ("At this they wept aloud again. Then Orpah kissed her mother-in-law goodbye, but Ruth clung to her". Ruth 1:14, NIV) and is determined to go with her ("When Naomi realized that Ruth was determined to go with her, she stopped urging ...


4

It is clear that this is a single protracted seige with the "ninth year of his reign" of 2 Kings 25:1 refers to Zedekiah. The immediate context is 2 Kings 24:20 (last bit of last verse of preceding chapter): Now Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon. OP includes 2 Kgs 25:2 in the quotations in the question, which itself provides the answer: ...


4

This is a more complicated question than the binary alternative posed by OP's title question would suggest. In fact, the KJV here does a good job of reflecting an ambiguity in the Hebrew that almost all other translations obscure (including the NJKV). Translation? Here is the Hebrew text of 2 Kings 8:11 with a literal gloss: וַיַּעֲמֵ֥ד אֶת־פָּנָ֖יו ...


4

Excellent question. The problem is further confounded by the fact that in 2 Kings 10:30 Jehu is even rewarded for his action in Jezreel, so how can Jehu be both rewarded and punished for the same act? Some commentaries suggest that though Elijah prophesied that this will happen to the house of Ahab, it still does not vindicate the perpetrator from his ...


4

The real intent of king Ahaziah was to defy Elijah, considering him only a man, and not a ‘man of God’, really. The first two captains tried to fulfill this kingly purpose along with all their arrogance. Interestingly, the prophet in this instance performed a word-play (or, word pun) between the two Hebrew terms we translate ‘man’ and ‘fire’, respectively, ...


4

There is some uncertainty as to whether this actually means "dove's dung" or not (More on this below). I am inclined to accept as is because Josephus reports that in one of the Roman sieges, the citizens were reduced to eating excrement. Note this quote from Josephus, Wars, V, 13, 7. And they told him further, that when they were no longer able ...


4

First off, keep in mind that dove's dung was pretty common in the olden days as they raised doves in columbaria. Doves were common since they were used as sacrifices, among other purposes. A natural byproduct of raising doves is large quantities of dove dung, or guano. While dung could be used as fertilizer, or as fuel for fire, it would normally be very ...


3

Then the king of Moab took his oldest son, who would have been the next king, and sacrificed him as a burnt offering on the wall. So there was great anger against Israel, and the Israelites withdrew and returned to their own land. (2 Kings 3:27, NLT) I'd interpret this as saying that the king sacrificed his son which then fuelled the rage of the Moabites - ...


3

Clarke seems to have a good quote to borrow on the matter. According to him the Chaldee translates 2 Kings 2:12 (where Elisha uses the same phrase with respect to Elijah) as: "My master, my master! who, by thy intercession, wast of more use to Israel than horses and chariots." This seems to make sense. Basically Elisha looked upon Elijah as his spiritual ...


3

The word נַעַר (na’ar), here translated "boy," has a broad range of meaning. It can refer to infants all the way up to adolescence. However, קטנ (qatan meaning "small"), used with it, limits the age. The exact phrase, "small boys" appears in the following verses (all from the NET Bible): 1 Sam 20:35 The next morning Jonathan, along with a young servant, ...


3

Placing one's garments on the ground for another to ride or walk on is a sign of subservience to the walker*. This can also be seen in the triumphal entry (Matthew 21:7-8; Mark 11:7-8; Luke 19:35-36; John 12:12-15). Matthew 21:7 They brought the donkey and the colt, placed their cloaks on them, and Jesus sat on them. Matthew 21:8 A very large crowd spread ...


3

This story is very profound. It is interesting that manslaughter is typified through the dislocated ax head. That is, we read in the Law of Moses as follows. Deuteronomy 19:4-6 (NASB) 4 Now this is the case of the manslayer who may flee there and live: when he kills his friend unintentionally, not hating him previously— 5 as when a man goes into the ...


3

Synchronisms between the reigns of the northern and southern kingdoms (Israel and Judah) are all affected by an apparent discrepancy of a few years. The case of Joash’s 23rd year is particularly affected, but the basic reason is the same as other kings. It relates to whether a kingdom uses the 'accessional' or 'non-accessional' method of dating. In both ...


3

There is no problem here. Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus. Jesus knows that Nicodemus has great knowledge of the scriptures. Jesus pulls from Proverbs 30:4 to speak of the lack of understanding Nicodemus is having. 4 Who has ascended to heaven and come down? Who has gathered the wind in his fists? Who has wrapped up the waters in a garment? Who has ...


3

In Keil and Delitzsch's Commentary,(2 Kings 2) The request of Elisha is evidently based upon Deu 21:17, where בּ פּי־שׁנים denotes the double portion which the first-born received in (of) the father's inheritance, as R. Levi b. Gers., Seb. Mnst., Vatabl., Grot., and others have perceived, and as Hengstenberg (Beitrr. ii. p. 133f.) in our days ...


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