12

Regarding "key differences": When one battles, one has also encountered - no issue. When one engages, one has also met - no issue. When one is said to have been killed "by" a commander of troops, that does not mean one was necessarily killed directly by that commander. It can just as easily have been by the troops that were under his command. For example, ...


12

The conjunction waw can mean "or" in some cases. Here's Joüon-Muraoka (formatting mine): The idea represented by the Engl[ish] or is usually expressed by אוֹ... But instead of this precise word, a Waw often suffices, e.g. [2 Sam 2:19:] לא־נָטָה לָלֶ֫כֶת עַל־הַיָּמִין וְעַל־הַשְּׂמֹאל he did not turn aside right or (nor) left, ...


7

The answer is in Numbers 9:6-13, (NKJV): 6 Now there were certain men who were defiled by a human corpse, so that they could not keep the Passover on that day; and they came before Moses and Aaron that day. 7 And those men said to him, “We became defiled by a human corpse. Why are we kept from presenting the offering of the Lord at its appointed time ...


6

Since the OP notes the NRSV and ESV are built on the RSV, the main question is: Why would the RSV translators have used "or" here? This answer correctly notes that it is not wholly incorrect to use "or" for a waw, context determining whether a disjunctive idea as opposed to a conjunctive is warranted or not. So to answer "why" ...


6

You do realise (I trust) that the verb bārakh “to bless” is not actually the same word as the noun bεrεkh “knee”, though they are written the same in unvocalised Hebrew script. But, historically they do seem to belong to the same root. In most Semitic languages the verb b-r-k means “to bow down to, praise, bless” (said of a man/woman praising/blessing a god),...


6

Legal Justification The underlying legal basis for Hezekiah's action is found in Numbers: The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the people of Israel, saying, If any one of you or of your descendants is unclean through touching a dead body, or is on a long journey, he shall still keep the Passover to the LORD. In the second month on the fourteenth ...


6

Here is a comparison of the pointed and unpointed text of 1 Kings: וְעָבְיֹו טֶפַח וּשְׂפָתֹו כְּמַעֲשֵׂה שְׂפַת־כֹּוס פֶּרַח שֹׁושָׁן אַלְפַּיִם בַּת יָכִֽיל ועביו טפח ושפתו כמעשה שפת-כוס פרח שושן אלפים בת יכיל The word in bold, אלפים, means simply "thousand." Thousand or two thousand is determined by how the word is pronounced: Thousand: ...


5

I have searched various Lexicons but there seems no clear connection between kneeling and blessing other then a general religious sense of the kneeling posture. However if we look at this good summary of uses of the word below we could trace a plausible link. bless = bestow power for success, prosperity, fertility: animals Gn 1:22, men 1:28, 7th day 2:3, ...


5

Josephus indicates that King Uzziah was buried alone according to Antiquities 9:10.4 §227. In the Masoretic Text, the phrase "in the burial field that belonged to the kings" appears as follows in the Hebrew: According to the HAL, this Hebrew phrase speaks to a field adjoining the burial area of the kings. One limestone inscription found in Jerusalem and ...


5

This question is an exact replica of the same question on Got Questions. The answer is - also - on Got Questions, after the question. So I have just copied the answer to here : Jehoram is anointed king of Judah (2 Kings 1:17), ruling with his father, Jehoshaphat, for the final 5 or 6 years of his father’s reign. Elijah is translated to heaven (2 Kings 2:1–...


4

If we imagine that the people did most of the killing and that the priest's only sprinkled from each on to the altar then a sacrifice every four seconds is quite possible. The large number indicates how many people were involved and how energetic they were in accomplishing the task. According to Josephus a Passover-feast at Jerusalem in Nero’s time, the ...


4

The text in Genesis 22:2 says, “אֶרֶץ הַמֹּרִיָּה” ’eretz hammoriyah (the land [of] Moriah); Chronicles II 3:1, “הַר הַמּוֹרִיָּה” har hammoriyah (Mount Moriah, lit. “the mountain Moriah”). The traditional assumption is that Mount Moriah is the particular “one of the mountains” in the Moriah district where the events in Genesis 22 took place, but this is ...


4

1. I Kings 7:13. he, son of a woman, a widow, of the tribe of Naphtali [Young's Literal] son of a woman, a widow, he, of the tribe of Naphtali [Green's Literal] A 'widow of the tribe of Naphtali' is a woman who was married to a man of Naphtali which man is now deceased. She is a widow of the tribe into which she married. It was her deceased husband who was ...


4

On the number of fighting men in Judah, I would say both are correct, in different contexts. In mathematical terms you can think in terms of rounding and significant digits. Most scholars accept that biblical authors often rounded large numbers, but not always which leads to apparent contradictions like this one. See this link for another example of rounding....


4

Solomon says in 2 Chronicles 7:14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land. To seek God's face is to turn from wicked ways, to look to his presence, strength, and precepts. Before Solomon, ...


4

In Exodus, it is written that “the LORD used to speak to Moses face to face, just as a man speaks to his friend” (Ex 33:11). But in the same passage (Ex 33:20), God tells Moses, “You cannot see My face, for no man can see Me and live!” Though Moses could speak to God with the level of intimacy of a friend, he had to be shielded from seeing the actual face of ...


3

The principle reason for the near unanimous sense of commentators that Uzziah was buried apart from his ancestors -- seemingly reading against the natural sense of 2 Chronicles 26:23 -- has to do with the relation of this verse to its counterpart in 2 Kings 15:7: +--------------------------------------+--------------------------------------+ | 2 ...


3

The phrase "covenant of salt" is likely used as a figure of speech in II Chronicles 13:4-5 to indicate an everlasting covenant rather than as a specific reference to the covenant of Aaron. The classical commentators suggest that the metaphor "covenant of salt" originated from the well known use of salt as a preservative. See also Leviticus 2:13. Abijah is ...


3

There is no way possible that the 36th year was during the reign of Asa, since Baasha only reigned 24 yrs (1 Ki 15:33), and that reign had only begun when Asa was already sitting as king in Judah for about 4-5 years. In other words, "in the 36th year" refers to the time when the person was king since the kingdom divided, which is the preference of the writer(...


3

First I should clarify that the reference in beginning of 2 kings is to a rebellion not a full fledged war (this can be proven from 3:4-5 cited later). Moab rebelled against Israel which led to a war between Israel and Moab (recorded in chapter 3). Israel sent for Judah to be her ally and to go with her to wage war against Moab. The king of Judah at that ...


3

There are several ways in which Uzziah's actions should be seen as "more serious" than Saul's and so would warrant a "more severe" response: Uzziah's actions occurred at the altar in Solomon's Temple, the dedicated location for national offerings. Saul's actions occurred in Gilgal and there is no record the altar or the Tabernacle of Moses were there. So ...


3

The simple answer to the question is: Ahaziah was 22 years old when he began to reign according to 2 Kings 8:26. The Hebrew text has been corrupted in 2 Chron 22:2 by recording "42 years old" - this can be deduced from several lines of evidence: The text of 2 Kings 8:26 differs Ahaziah's father was only 40 years old when he died (2 Chron 21:5, 20) making ...


3

The logic is simple; here are the facts from 2 Chron 25: v6 - 100,000 men hired from Israel Amaziah paid (to the leaders of Ephraim) 100 talents of silver for the soldiers If this money had been paid to the soldiers, it could have been 1/1000th of a talent of sliver each - not much money! Actually, the money would have been paid to the leaders only. The ...


3

Amaziah would have been better off had he not hired the Ephraimite troops. This was a lesson for trusting God in the first place and not in the second place.


2

The evidence, and the consensus of critical scholars, is that the Deuteronomic History (Joshua, Judges, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings and 2 Kings), written before the Babylonian Exile, was the main source for the Book of Chronicles (now 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles), but that the author of Chronicles probably had other material available as well. Chronicles ...


2

Exodus 29:1 gives Yahweh's instructions for the consecration of priests as, one young bull and two rams without blemish. All of the versions have "AND". Knowing Yahweh's requirements, Abijah has his tongue firmly planted in his cheek when he says to Jeroboam (with the conjunction as it should be): ... so that whosoever cometh to consecrate himself with a ...


2

When the Book of Kings (1 Kings and 2 Kings were originally a single book that was eventually split because of its length) talks of the book of chronicles of the kings of Israel, it could not be referring the the Book we know as Chronicles (1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles) because Chronicles was written centuries later. Most critical scholars attribute the ...


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