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1

I'm still a fledgling translating/interpreting the Hebrew. That said, I see no way that 'bread' can be interpreted from the Hebrew in the last phrase of 1Sam 21:5. Preliminary assessment is that David said something against anointed Saul and the scribe intentionally made the phrase ambiguous. 1Sam. 21:5 - ...vessels-of the-lads holiness. Saul/hua way-of/drk ...


2

In the next chapter, David encountered Saul in a cave as Saul relieved himself but David didn't kill him. Saul felt some remorse in 1 Samuel 24: 16 When David finished saying this, Saul asked, “Is that your voice, David my son?” And he wept aloud. 17“You are more righteous than I,” he said. “You have treated me well, but I have treated you badly. ... 20 I ...


0

Goliath's height was six cubits and a span (1 Samuel 17:4). NIV Footnotes: That is, about 9 feet 9 inches or about 3 meters If David could handle Goliath's sword, David wouldn't be too short.


1

An even earlier statistics is found in 1 Samuel 11:8 When Saul mustered them at Bezek, the men of Israel numbered three hundred thousand and those of Judah thirty thousand. One reason for mentioning Judah separately was the fact that Judah and Philistine shared borders. https://www.bible-history.com/maps/philistines.html Another reason has to do the ...


5

Yeah, good question. I think there are a couple of possibilities. First, we can probably rule out that it was just time passing, even though that's something that can happen between chapters. In other episodes, Saul does try to kill David; fails; repents; and things go back to normal for a while. But in this case, we can guess that it was under a month since ...


0

This is just as significant a libation as done in Africa particularly among the Ewe people of Ghana, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. The water offering (pouring) or libation serves the purposes of Thanksgiving, Requesting, Pacification and Adoration. The purpose in this context rests on thanking God for taking them through the fasting as well as adoring His ...


0

The "problem" here is the translation of the last part of 1 Sam 4:21. The immediate context present two pertinent facts: Hophni & Phinehas were killed in battle Eli died by misadventure when he fell from his seat and broke his neck The last part of 1 Sam 4:21 literally says (my translation): ... because the Ark of God had been capture and ...


3

1 Samuel 4:12 That same day a Benjamite ran from the battle line and went to Shiloh with his clothes torn and dust on his head. 13When he arrived, there was Eli sitting on his chair by the side of the road, watching, because his heart feared for the ark of God. When the man entered the town and told what had happened, the whole town sent up a cry. 14 Eli ...


0

The laws of ancient Israel were "kind" - the ceremonial laws particularly allow people, because of incapacity, or in this case, child rearing, not to attend the Tabernacle on the three occasions each year as specified in Ex 23:14-17, 34:23, 24, Deut 16:16, etc. In any case, the text quoted by the OP in Deut 12:11 only discusses the sacred gifts to ...


1

The operative verb in 1 Sam 17:49 is טָבַע (taba) which is "to sink down". It occurs 10 times in the OT and is always translated "sink down" or similar, Ex 15:4 - Egyptian army drowned in the Red Sea Job 38:6 - foundation sunk into the earth Ps 91:5 - The nations have sunk down in the pit Ps 69:2 - I have sunk in deep mire Ps 69:14 - ...


3

Exodus 23: 14 “Three times a year you are to celebrate a festival to me. 15“Celebrate the Festival of Unleavened Bread; for seven days eat bread made without yeast, as I commanded you. Do this at the appointed time in the month of Aviv, for in that month you came out of Egypt. “No one is to appear before me empty-handed. 16“Celebrate the Festival of Harvest ...


1

1 Samuel 22:1 David left Gath and escaped to the cave of Adullam. Adullam was located in Judah. http://www.jesuswalk.com/david/04_david_fugitive.htm When his brothers and his father’s household heard about it, they went down to him there. 2All those who were in distress or in debt or discontented gathered around him, and he became their commander. About ...


1

There are a couple of laws that directly relate marriage and war. Deuteronomy 20:7 Has anyone become pledged to a woman and not married her? Let him go home, or he may die in battle and someone else marry her." Deuteronomy 24:5 If a man has recently married, he must not be sent to war or have any other duty laid on him. For one year he is to be free ...


3

It appears that the only regulation that 1 Sam 21:4 alludes to is found in Lev 15:18 - If a man lies with a woman and there is an emission of semen, both must bathe with water, and they will remain unclean until evening. This regulation had nothing specific relating to war. Thus, following sexual intercourse, a man and woman were "unclean" for ...


0

We need to read this very carefully in the light of what was happening between Israel and Philistia - a war! Note that the word for "wilderness" in 1 Sam 4:8 is מִדְבָּר which is the same word used in Ex 13:20 at Succoth at the Red sea where the Egyptian army drowned. Now, while there are two sets of events here: (1) the plagues on the Egyptians ...


1

I am not sure that this question is definitively answerable because we cannot know the judgements of God. However, the evidence is compelling: Saul wan anointed with oil and consecrated for a special task, 1 Sam 10:1 Saul was given a "new heart", 1 Sam 10:9 Saul had the gift of the Holy Spirit, 1 Sam 10:9 Saul prophesied, 1 Sam 10:10, 12 Saul ...


1

The "heart" is a frequent metaphor in the OT that has been adopted by many cultures 9including our modern culture) - the heart is viewed as a metaphor for the seat of emotions and the true self. Deut 6:5 - Love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. Deut 10:12 - And now, Israel, what does the LORD ...


0

The question "Did King Saul lose his salvation?" makes a very large assumption. What reason is there to believe that Saul was ever offered salvation? In the Hebrew scriptures, "salvation" tends to be of a physical kind, very unlike the salvation that Christians believe in. It's not possible to lose something that one never had.


2

1 Samuel 10:9 (ESV): When he turned his back to leave Samuel, God gave him another heart. And all these signs came to pass that day. What does it that "God gave him another heart"? Did Saul get saved or have a conversion experience at that moment? Gill answers it this way: God gave him another heart; not in a moral or spiritual sense, not a new ...


0

1 Samuel 10:10 When they came to Gibeah, behold, a group of prophets met him, and the Spirit of God rushed upon him, and he prophesied among them. Note that the Spirit was not in him. 1 Samuel 16:14 Now the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and a harmful spirit from the Lord tormented him. Did King Saul lose his salvation? It depends on how you ...


2

נָוִית (Naioth) only occurs six times in the OT and all in a few verses in the passage, 1 Sam 19:18 - 20:1. BDB gives the following entry: proper name, of a location in Ramah (possibly = habitations, but dubious, see Dr 1 Samuel 19:18 HPS); — adode of prophets 1 Samuel 19:18,19,22,23 (twice in verse) and 1 Samuel 20:1 (where Baer נוות Kt); followed by ...


2

What does this reveal about God? "God is love" (1 John 4:8, 16). ... and "Love is patient, love is kind. ..." 1 Cor 13:4 God gave the wicked Amalekites a very long probation beginning at the time of the Exodus to the time of Esther - about 1000 years! God is very patient and kind! It also reveals that king Saul, despite his boasts to the ...


1

1 Sam 16:10 makes clear that Jesse had (at that time) eight sons with David being the youngest. Thus Jesse made seven of his sons pass before Samuel, but Samuel told him, “The LORD has not chosen any of these.” 11And Samuel asked him, “Are these all the sons you have?” “There is still the youngest,” Jesse replied, “but he is tending the sheep.” However, 1 ...


1

The story in 1 Sam 16 comes immediately after the incidents of 1 Sam 15 in which a lowly prophet denounces the King!! Recall the main points of 1 Sam 15 - Samuel rebukes Saul very strongly so that an embarrassed Saul must confess his grievous sin Samuel then predicts that Saul's kingdom and dynasty was doomed because the Lord had rejected Saul When king ...


1

The history of the Amalekites is long and tortuous (see appendix below). However, I note that there are several prophecies of the final annihilation of the Amalekites such as: Ex 17:14-16 - Then the LORD said to Moses, “Write this on a scroll as a reminder and recite it to Joshua, because I will utterly blot out the memory of Amalek from under heaven.” And ...


3

1 Sam 13:1 is problematic because the Hebrew text is clearly missing something. Indeed, my ESV has this: Saul was ... years old when he began to reign, and when he had reigned ... and two years over Israel Both the Grammar and the text suggest that there are two gaps as shown above. The NIV has the following Saul was [thirty] years old when he became ...


2

New American Standard Bible 1 Samuel 13:1 Saul was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned for forty-two years over Israel. The words "thirty" and "forty" are not in the original Hebrew. Berean Literal Bible Acts 13:21 Then they asked for a king, and God gave them Saul son of Kish, a man of the tribe of Benjamin, for ...


4

Anger is not listed as the fruit (singular) of the Spirit that Christians cultivate, namely: Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control (Galatians 5:22). However, the Spirit of God is unique. The Spirit of God was involved in creation (Genesis 1:1-2). When Samuel anointed David the Spirit of God came upon David ...


3

Is anger a fruit of the Spirit? I don't think so. To be sure, I'm offering a New Testament interpretation of an Old Testament text. -- Fruit of the Spirit 22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, 23 Meekness, temperance...(Galatians 5:22-23) Contrast this with Paul's comments on the works of the flesh: ...


2

Mark 3:5 He looked around at them in anger and, deeply distressed at their stubborn hearts, said to the man, "Stretch out your hand." He stretched it out, and his hand was completely restored. Jesus was filled with the Spirit all the time and he was angry in Mark.


0

The significance is the weapon itself. It could be long and thick, enough to hold such a weighted head, but what else does a weaver's beam have? Some type of rope curling around it. Goliath's spear was unique (at least from our perspective and time period) in that there was a wrapped cord around it, where Goliath could put let's say, two fingers in it. You ...


2

The operative word here is בְּדָ֔ן which transliterates as "Bedan". However, as is well known, spelling in ancient times was far from uniform and standardized as today. thus, people could sometimes spell their own names differently. For this and some closely related reasons, the NIV uses the LXX text to read "Barak" as explained by ...


2

The OT is filled with "types" of Jesus and the OP has observed two more. One of the most famous is that of Joseph as a type of Jesus: both are rejected by their own people both became servants both are betrayed for silver both are falsely accused and face false witnesses both attain stations at the "right hand" of the respective thrones ...


4

The operative word translated "anger" in 1 Sam 11:6 is אַף = "nostril" or "nose". To understand this, one must recall that Hebrew has no abstract nouns like "anger" and so must represent abstract entities with concrete nouns. This same word אַף also occurs in many places such as: Gen 2:7, 3:19 (sweat of your nose), 7:...


1

There are three things given the name "Tabor": A mountain on the border of Issachar, Josh 19:22 (which may have been close to #2 below). It appears to be associated with an island mountain in Jer 46:18, and mount Herman in Ps 89:12, and served as the rallying point for Naphtali and Zebulun in Judges 4:6, 12, 14, etc. A town in the Territory of ...


2

Hannah and Mary had a lot in common. When the songs were written, Hannah had given birth to Samuel while Mary was carrying Jesus in her womb. Both songs open similarly with rejoicing: Hannah opens with "My heart rejoices in the Lord. In the Lord my horn is lifted high. My mouth speaks boldly against my enemies, Because I rejoice in Your salvation." ...


1

I'll attempt a bit of character analysis. First of all, Eli was the high priest. His words carried awesome authority. More than any other Israelites, Eli represented God. He should have been more careful with the words that came out of his mouth. Imagine your pastor incorrectly accuses you of wrongdoing while your heart is breaking. Let's see the context: 1 ...


2

What does 1 Samuel 1:13 reveal to us about Eli? "Now [Hannah] was praying in her heart; only her lips moved, but her voice could not be heard. So Eli thought she was drunk." ( וְחַנָּ֗ה הִ֚יא מְדַבֶּ֣רֶת עַל־לִבָּ֔הּ רַ֚ק שְׂפָתֶ֣יהָ נָּע֔וֹת וְקוֹלָ֖הּ לֹ֣א יִשָּׁמֵ֑עַ וַיַּחְשְׁבֶ֥הָ עֵלִ֖י לְשִׁכֹּרָֽה ) Regarding Eli's thoughts about Channah during 1 ...


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