20

The only Biblical answer I can find is that the men were at least 20 to be in the army. So David would have been less then twenty if he was considered too young to fight. Num 1:3 from twenty years old and upward, whoever is able to go out to war in Israel, you and Aaron shall number them by their armies. The following is only conjecture and can not be ...


14

The OP questions why translators take the root ברא (brʾ) here in the sense "to be fat" rather than the homonym "to create", which is more common in the Hebrew Bible. I see several good reasons. The word in 1 Sam 2:29 -- habriʾăkem -- is in the hifil stem. The word brʾ meaning "to create" is only used in the qal and nifil. Therefore, taking it as hifil would ...


13

The phrase "seven children" in the poem is almost certainly poetic and not intended to indicate that Hannah actually bore seven children. The number seven was a number of completion in the ancient Near East. It is readily seen elsewhere: Ruth 4:15 — He will renew your life and sustain you in your old age. For your daughter-in-law, who loves you and ...


11

Interacting with Frank Luke's response, I like the theory proposed by E.W. Bullinger, however it does not seem to fit with what immediately follows in Chapter 18. First of all I believe that Bullinger is correct in his analysis of the construction of the passage. I agree that the intent is to contrast the Spirit coming upon David and leaving Saul, and ...


11

This information is in further support of an answer close to Joshua Wilson's (which was not really much other information that the original link you posted), though leaning toward the older end of his range and perhaps even slightly older (15-18 years old). Reading commentaries and looking at various translations informs one that Saul's age and length of ...


10

David, in convincing Saul why he should be allowed to be Israel's representative on the battlefield says, "Your servant has struck down both lions and bears, and this uncircumcised Philistine shall be like one of them, for he has defied the armies of the living God." And to Goliath he says, You come to me with a sword and with a spear and with a ...


9

The World Health Organization reports that the average weaning age is 4.2 years worldwide at present, however the weaning age has declined in modern times and the weaning age would have been higher in the past. This is supported by the book of II Maccabees, 7:27 wherein a mother casually mentions giving milk to her son for three years which would be ...


9

In fact, David was obeying the law in 1 Sam 23:5 & 27:9 when he destroyed the cities and carried off the livestock. The Torah was quite clear about this: there were two cases to consider: Generally, when Israel attacked a city (only after offering terms of peace Deut 20:10-12), then the army was permitted to take booty and livestock. Deut 20:13, 14, ...


7

Does 1 Samuel 15 disprove the "Ancient Near East Warfare Rhetoric" theory? In short, no. Nothing about 1 Samuel 15 disproves the Ancient Near East Warfare Rhetoric. The concept within such rhetoric is that the language is exaggeration; that God did not actually require literally every single thing which breathed to be hunted down and killed. The article ...


7

Eli's Failure Somewhat regardless of whether the word כָּהָה (kāhâ) should mean "rebuke" or "restrain," at the point which the sons refused to obey their father Eli (1 Sam 2:25), Eli should have had his sons killed on the basis of two, and possibly three points of the Law (quotes from NASB): Dishonoring God's Law—Lev 3 and Lev 4 with Num 15:30-311 ...


7

OP (bold added): Exod 23: 17 Three times in the year all thy males shall appear before the Lord GOD. According to Exodus only males were allowed to appear before the Lord in the annual feasts,so how can we understand the above text? No, Exodus 23:17 does not delimit attendance at festivals to "your males" (זְכוּרְךָ) -- rather, it explicitly ...


7

The "chabod" part of the name Ichabod (אִיכָבוֹד) comes without doubt from the word כָּבוֹד, which is the word for glory in the latter portion of the verse. The "I" (אִי) has been interpreted variously as "woe" (Greek), making the name mean "woe honor!"; "no" (Rashi), for "no honor"; or "where" (Radak), for "where is honor?" אִי as "no" appears in the ...


6

What an excellent question! Aaron had four sons: two died an early death with no survivors, and the other two sons survived:-- Eleazar and Ithamar. Thus the Levites who served as priests at the time of David are all descended from one of these two priestly lines. In the Hebrew Bible, when we see the Ahimelech(father)/Abiathar(son) team, these two are the ...


6

Is dead Samuel's appearance to Saul 'real'? According to the plain declaration of Scripture the medium did, in fact, see Samuel (1 Samuel 28:12). Furthermore, in the same verse we see that, after a fashion, the medium herself attests to the genuineness of Samuel's appearance by crying out with a loud voice. Apparently this was something she had not expected....


6

"Jonathan, you are shaming your own mother (i.e. violating commandment 5 of the decalogue), not that I think that she is anything but a perverse and rebellious woman (who would produce a child like you)." That is, when stating "to the shame of your mother's nakedness" Saul is speaking to Jonathan in Jonathan's frame of reference of a child to his mother, i....


6

The short answer is: No, it was not the norm to kill men and women and children in war. The standard practice in ancient warfare was to offer peace when besieging a city, of course the peace terms were conditioned on complete surrender of the inhabitants and by reducing it to a vassal kingdom. If they didn't accept complete surrender, the male population ...


6

According to the BDB Lexicon the Hebrew translated to "cover his feet" by the KJV (literal translation of לְהָסֵ֣ךְ אֶת־רַגְלָ֑יו) is a euphemism for emptying the bowels: Hiph. Impf. 3 ms. יָ֑סֶךְ לָךְ ψ 91:4, וַיָּ֑סֶךְ Ex 40:21 + 2 times; 2 ms. תָּסֵךְ ψ 5:12; Inf. cstr. הָסֵךְ 1 S 24:4; Pt. מֵסִיךְ Je 3:24 (Ges 67 );—screen, cover, 1. specif. c. אֶת־...


5

I Sam 12:11 in 4QSam Frg.d has only the word "Jerubal", the rest of the verse is missing. Leningrad and Allepo have "...Jerubbaal and Bedan and Jephthah and Samuel...", same in Brenton's English LXX. RASHI says Bedan is Samson as he was "in [the tribe of] Dan" ("b'Dan") or "of the tribe of Dan" ("ben Dan"). The targum has "...Gideon and Samson and Jephtah ...


5

The Idea in Brief Eli had done nothing to "tone down" his sons, or to mitigate their behavior. So while on the one hand he had rebuked them in Chapter 2, there is nothing in the text to suggest that he had done anything from that time onward to mitigate their behavior, which is the observation in Chapter 3. Later in the book, Samuel himself comes to have ...


5

The commentators all note the significant place that the root š.ʾ.l has in the opening chapter of Samuel. Because of the punch-line ("he is lent (šāʾûl) to the LORD") in v. 28, many also are minded to think that it belongs, rather, to a now missing birth narrative of Saul. This remains contentious. It is also the case that the forms that bother OP have ...


5

To take OP's main question in two stages, starting with the latter: [OP] ... could כה לחי mean something like "now to next year"? No, I don't think so. The main reason for this is already implicit in the information provided. For kōh to take on a temporal flavour, it really needs the help of ʿad to provide that nuance. Both HALOT and BDB (sub 3) list the ...


5

Excellent question. Indeed, cremation was not the accepted burial rite in Ancient Israel, and this was definitely an unusual practice by Israelite standards and almost unheard of in the ANE (The only people known to practice cremation were the Hurrians and the Hittites), so this must have been an exception to the rule, see here. However, this author ...


4

Samuel lived around 1100-900 BC. Esther lived around 475 BC (Assuming Xerxes I is the king referred to in that account). I wouldn't trust Wikipedia to offer an analysis proceeding from the assumption that the Bible is true and reliable. I can't speak about modern Jewish tradition, but Deuteronomy 25:17-19 is about the Amalekites attacking Israel after they ...


4

I believe that the text indicates that David wrote it in a reflectory fashion. In the annotation, the noun "טַ֭עְמוֹ" "his behavior" is the key to this. This noun is also used in 1 Samuel 21:14. The interesting thing about this noun is that it can also mean "taste", e.g. "אִם־יֶשׁ־טַ֝֗עַם בְּרִ֣יר חַלָּמֽוּת׃" "or is there any taste in the white of an ...


4

If you further read the text in 1 Samuel 2:5, AFTER Hannah leaves Samuel with Eli and when she is praising the Lord she says, "She who was barren has borne seven children, but she who has many sons pines away." Hannah is referring to herself in the first part of that sentence, so by the time she committed Samuel to the Lord as a servant of the priest (which ...


4

The Masoretic text of the phrase translated "young as he was" (NIV) and "the child was very young" (VDC) translates literally as "and the boy [was] a boy." This phrase is והנער נער. Both translations are in agreement that it indicates the youngness of Samuel. However, other translations assume a textual problem here. They conclude that the repetition of na'...


4

The Hebrew expression given in the KJV as "from the LORD" is מֵאֵ֥ת יְהוָֽה. It occurs 36 times in the Hebrew Text of the Old Testament (WLC). For example: Genesis 19:24 - brimstone and fire "from the LORD" rained on Sodom and Gomorrah Numbers 11:31 - quail "from the LORD" fell over the camp of Israel in the wilderness Numbers 16:35 - fire "from the LORD" ...


4

Dr. Berel Lerner has provided an answer to this question here. In short, the KJV translation of 1 Samuel 15:7 is inaccurate. The Hebrew reads: וַיִּתְפֹּ֛שׂ אֶת־אֲגַ֥ג מֶֽלֶךְ־עֲמָלֵ֖ק חָ֑י וְאֶת־כָּל־הָעָ֖ם הֶחֱרִ֥ים לְפִי־חָֽרֶב׃ The key word is הָעָ֖ם, which is usually translated as "the nation" or "the people." However, the term can also refer ...


4

Saul and Ahinoam - 6 children: Jonathan -> Mephibosheth - Mica - etc. Ishui (Abinadab) Melchishua Ishbosheth (Eshbaal) Merab (f) (eldest) - [five children by Adriel] Michal (f) - wife of David x2. (Michal raised Merab's children for some reason.) Saul and Rizpah (concubine) - [Armoni and Mephibosheth] So, David gave over to the Gibeonites the five ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible