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15

This is an ancient question... The rabbis of the Talmud [BT Hullin 5a] discuss both opinions: What is meant by ‘the ravens’ ['orevim]? Ravina said: It means actual ravens. R. Ada ben Manyomi said to him: "Could it not mean two men whose names were Orev?" He replied, "How could it have happened that both were named Orev?" "But perhaps they were so named ...


11

Frankly, I also searched for but couldn’t find much of others addressing the parallels of Ruth and Elisha. Walfish was almost always the writer. What I did find were mostly studies of one book that had cross references to the other(s) (e.g. Ruth noting a Kings book or vice versa). For some other material I found, see the comment at the bottom of this ...


10

Was he insecure or unsure that God who performed miracle through him, would also save him from Jezebel? We aren't told explicitly of course, but we do know that he was afraid Jezebel would kill him: 2Then Jezebel sent a messenger to Elijah, saying, “So may the gods do to me and more also, if I do not make your life as the life of one of them by this time ...


10

we don't even know what the real numerical value of pi is. When written out as a number, it will always be rounded. The question is: At which decimal place will you believe God's Word is true? The hundredth decimal place, the thousandth decimal place? I'm guessing for most, there will never be enough decimal places. For me pi = 3 is close enough.


9

The original question contained a link to the interesting article by Rendsburg 1988: http://jewishstudies.rutgers.edu/docman/rendsburg/64-the-mock-of-baal-in-1-kings-18-27/file Has anyone else looked at it? The author argues that śiăḥ and śiḡ are a hendiadys. śiḡ or siḡ is well-known in the meaning “go away, step aside”, and can thus reasonably be ...


8

It is not uncommon for God to use animals to perform tasks in the Tanakh/Old Testament, so this would not be an anomaly. At the same time, ancient Near East (ANE) hospitality makes 'Arabs' a possibility (it is plausible). Concerning the issue of ritual impurity, Elijah was out in the wilderness, nowhere near the temple nor other Jews. Who cares if he became ...


8

The text does not give a direct answer to this question. That is not to say we must be left wondering! There are two common reasons why a text may omit details that would seem relevant to us. They are simply not relevant to what the author was trying to communicate.1 It is assumed that the immediate audience would have understood the scenario given their ...


6

1 Kings 17:23 = Lk 7:15 καὶ ἔδωκεν αὐτὸν τῇ μητρὶ αὐτοῦ The wording in Lk 7:15 agrees word for word with 1 Kings 17:23 (LXX). I think it is very likely that the author of Luke had the LXX version of the Elijah story in front of him (or at least in his memory) and took it as a literary model. Compare also: 1 Kings 17:10 εἰς τὸν πυλῶνα τῆς πόλεως, καὶ ἰδοὺ…...


6

Background In his paper The Mock of Baal in 1 Kings 18:27, Gary A. Rendsburg explains the issue: …Elijah began to taunt his opponents about the inefficacy of their god. His exact words are as follows: “shout in a loud voice, for he is a god, kî śîaḥ wêḵî śîg lō, or he may be on a journey, or perhaps he is sleeping or waking up.” (1 Kgs 18:27) The ...


6

I do not think that any lying or deception was involved here at all. After-all, everyone was aware of all the facts and Ahab did not provide and misleading information; nor did he with hold any. The reason for this almost bizarre behavior by Ahab is probably a much simpler reason: he harbored a guilty conscience and knew that Micaiah's prophecies 1 Kings 22:...


5

The Kerith Ravine is home to a river somewhere east of the Jordan, which marked the eastern border of the land given to Israel. On a purely physical level, it functions (unlike the Jordan) as a place far away and hidden from King Ahab who was seeking Elijah's life because of the drought. The name Kerith means a "cutting" or "separation." While having to do ...


5

Let us take a look at all the measures (of time, length, surface, and volume) involved in 1 Kings 6-7, describing the construction of Solomon's Temple : 1 Kings 6:1  In the four hundred and eightieth1 year after (the Exodus), in the fourth year of Solomon, in the second month. 1 The Septuagint has four hundred and fortieth. 1 Kings 6:2  The length ...


5

At the outset 1 Kings, King David is near death and he hasn't explicitly chosen a successor. David's first three children, Amnon, Absalom, and the unnamed child from II Samuel 12 are dead, so Adonijah is next in line for the throne. Adonijah thinks he will be king and he has an entourage, but he doesn't have the support of the whole nation (1 Kings 1:5-10). ...


5

Oxen were very expensive in biblical times. Few farmers owned even a single team of them. In ancient documents from elsewhere in the Near East, there are records of farmers renting them from wealthy owners or even government officials. My assumption that that Elisha owns both the oxen and the land is that he's in charge of the whole team of and yet he's ...


5

There are three ways to reconcile the two passages. First, the word of the LORD came to Elijah in the third year. In the third year could mean at some time during the third year. For example, Scripture describes David's 7-year reign from Hebron as 7-years and 7-years and 6-months (ESV): And the time that David reigned over Israel was forty years. He reigned ...


5

Here is a comparison of the pointed and unpointed text of 1 Kings: וְעָבְיֹו טֶפַח וּשְׂפָתֹו כְּמַעֲשֵׂה שְׂפַת־כֹּוס פֶּרַח שֹׁושָׁן אַלְפַּיִם בַּת יָכִֽיל ועביו טפח ושפתו כמעשה שפת-כוס פרח שושן אלפים בת יכיל The word in bold, אלפים, means simply "thousand." Thousand or two thousand is determined by how the word is pronounced: Thousand: ...


5

Apology: My Bible study took a couple of hours, by which time Dottard had posted his answer (which I think is very good). I had prepared my answer in a story-telling format, then hesitated to post it, thinking it would not be sufficiently scholarly for this site. Then I thought, why not share my findings with others? It's a fascinating account with all ...


4

The change is even more gradual than that. The narrative is intended to show Solomon very slowly becoming corrupted due to his power and wealth. For example: at the end of 1 Kings 6 it says he took 7 years to build God's temple (Heb: 'Beth'), and in the next verse (1 Kings 7:1) it says he took 14 years to beuild his own house (Heb: 'Beth'). So he already ...


4

The reference is to the daily sacrifice offered in the afternoon. Numbers 28 (4). Most non-Jewish translations use the word “twilight” for the Hebrew term The Mishnah about Passover (called Pesachim Chap 5) deals with the time of the OP’s “evening sacrifice”. “The daily burnt-offering' was slaughtered at the eighth hour and a half (note: After 6....


4

I found some interesting conenctions between the two: Both Ruth and Elisha are forceful and determined. Ruth "clung" to Naomi ("At this they wept aloud again. Then Orpah kissed her mother-in-law goodbye, but Ruth clung to her". Ruth 1:14, NIV) and is determined to go with her ("When Naomi realized that Ruth was determined to go with her, she stopped urging ...


4

If we imagine that the people did most of the killing and that the priest's only sprinkled from each on to the altar then a sacrifice every four seconds is quite possible. The large number indicates how many people were involved and how energetic they were in accomplishing the task. According to Josephus a Passover-feast at Jerusalem in Nero’s time, the ...


4

1 Kings 7:1-7 seems to come down in favor of (2), and v.8 to argue against (3). The reference to shields bears out the IVP Bible Background Commentary - O T's comment that, "Like other palace complexes in the ANE (such as those at Mari, Babylon and Susa), Solomon's ...palace itself was larger than the temple. It served as an administrative complex as well as ...


4

If you read the Elijah cycle carefully, and without prior assumptions of who Elijah is, you will notice a consistent pattern of untoward incidents and behavior. In this particular example: God send Elijah to the Cherit gulch. In Hebrew, "cherit" means "cutting off", "excommunicated" or "divorced". The fact that no such geographical place exists hints that ...


4

This is because the stone was already honed from the quarry from which it was taken so it did not require to be chizzeled or hammered at the building sight. It only required to be put in position. According to the blueprint each stone had its place and position relative to the other stones.Each stone had its own peculiarity and position In which it fits ...


4

When men war side by side in life or death battle, a lifelong brotherhood is formed. That brotherhood can cover a multitude of sins; Uriah's murder, the census, even the ugly reality of taking life in battle. David and Joab had been a lifetime of good and bad together. Since God put David in the position of King, King David was led by the Lord to protect ...


4

The word "brother" is commonly used in peace treaties. Here are some Hittite-Egyptian examples (not exactly contemporary, but still useful): Treaty between the Hittites and Egypt (1280 BCE) (ANET p. 199): ... while he is in brotherhood with me and he is at peace with me, and I am in brotherhood with him and I am at peace with him forever. Treaty ...


4

In the four hundred and eightieth year after the people of Israel came out of the land of Egypt, in the fourth year of Solomon's reign over Israel, in the month of Ziv, which is the second month, he began to build the house of the LORD. (1 Kings 6:1) [ESV throughout] As noted in the question, Paul's account of this period of history is 93 years longer: Paul ...


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