Hot answers tagged

46

First Enoch (or the Ethiopic Enoch) stands alone among the Jewish apocalypses for length, diversity, and richness.1 No other ancient non-canonical work influenced the Jewish world of the first century as much as Enoch.2 With its interest in suffering, evil, demons, and the Last Judgment, Enoch helps bridge the gap in life and thought between Malachi and ...


9

General Statements on Jesus' Son of Man and Enoch's Son of Man There is a literary connection. Brad Young (a scholar who seeks to illuminate the words of the New Testament by their parallels in rabbinic and intertestamental literature) includes a section on Enoch's use of the Son of Man in his work Jesus the Jewish Theologian.1 In 1 Enoch 46, we read: 1 And ...


7

The Connection is Unnecessary (Probably Unprovable) It seems unprovable that it is certainly a reference to 1 Enoch 69:27 (see Frank Luke's answer for a possible connection), simply because there is too much other canonical OT background material to support the statement without such a direct connection. The connection between the Son of Man and sitting on ...


4

If the question is asking whether the Holy Spirit validated Enoch 1 because Jude wrote ‘under the inspiration of the Spirit’ - then this can’t be done exegetical. It can only be argued. It becomes an academic exercise. Enoch 1 was accepted by the Jews living at the time Jude wrote this letter. Peter also references Enoch 1. These writers, the apostles knew ...


4

It's actually the opposite. Angels might be referred to as "sons of God" (see Job) but never as "a son of man." It should also be noted that his wording is awkward. 1 Enoch is a pre-Christian work, as you note in your question. To refer to an angel as a "son of man" goes against everything in Jewish thinking. They simply aren't. edit: Russell also seems to ...


4

Jude 1:8-13 (DRB) In like manner these men also defile the flesh, and despise dominion, and blaspheme majesty. 9 When Michael the archangel, disputing with the devil, contended about the body of Moses, he durst not bring against him the judgment of railing speech, but said: The Lord command thee. 10 But these men blaspheme whatever things they know not: and ...


3

The origin is of Hewbrew / Judaism mysticism. Some suppose it to be from the Midrash and Talmud oral traditions passed down from the 3rd - 1st century BC, and then later picked up and reprinted as the Book of Enoch. From Chabad.org, "Nephilim: Fallen Angels, Giants, or Men?" "The Midrash3 relates that when the generation of the Flood went astray, G‑d ...


2

The book of 1 Enoch (there is also 2 Enoch and 3 Enoch) was well known in the few centuries around the time of Christ and was then lost. It was only re-discovered in 1773 by the Scottish explorer, James Bruce, in Ethiopia, having been preserved only in the sacred Ge’ez language. Fragments of the book were also discovered among the Dead Sea scrolls at ...


2

When do heavenly hosts tremble if not here during the Gen 6 incursion referenced in 1 Enoch 13? One such place would be the liturgies of John Chrysostom and Basil the Great, which read: No one bound by the desires and pleasures of the flesh is worthy to approach you or draw near to you or minister to you, King of glory; for to serve you is great and ...


2

The verse numbering of the NT Pseudepigrapha is not completely standardized yet. Thus, the phrase, "And they (sons of heaven) all became terrified, and trembled" from 1 Enoch 13 is found in: V3 in the Charlesworth/Isaac translation V4 in the Lumpkin translation and the Charles translation V5 in the Lawrence Translation I could find no reference ...


1

This amazing “quote” in Jude 14, 15 could be due to any of the following phenomena: Jude actually quoted from the book of 1 Enoch 1:9. However, this does not make 1 Enoch a Biblical book any more than Cyrus or Epimenides – see appendix below. (The Book of Revelation also quotes from 1 Enoch, see appendix.) Jude quotes from the real book of Enoch, now lost,...


1

The short answer appears to be, "YES" - Heb 4:13 seems to quote 1 Enoch 9:5 as correctly observed by the OP. The author Hebrews does not say this explicitly, but such a lack of attribution is the norm in the NT, even when it quotes the OT. The "Comprehensive New Testament" (Cornerstone Publications) provides an extremely extensive list of ...


1

Of course, there is no way one can be absolutely certain whom the original author of 1 Enoch intended to be represented by the great horn. Robert Henry Charles, who produced an English translation of 1 Enoch in 1893, commented on p. 251, The horned lambs, as we have seen, must be the Maccabees, and in the “great horn’ it is impossible to find any other ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible