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Questions related to the four canonical gospels-Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Questions may refer to narratives unique to a gospel or shared between gospels.

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I believe you are quoting the NASB version of John 6:65: And He was saying, “For this reason I have said to you, that no one can come to Me unless it has been granted him from the Father.” This, …
answered May 13 '19 by user33515
2
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The interpretation of this in antiquity seems to have been that Pilate was "getting even" with the Jews, so to speak, for essentially forcing him to crucify Jesus. Pilate had sought to release Him fr …
answered Oct 31 '18 by user33515
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There are actually two different Greek words being used here, which perhaps guides us to interpret the contexts differently. At the Wedding at Cana, Jesus uses the word ὥρα (ōra), from which comes …
answered Nov 13 '18 by user33515
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Gospels, writes: The miracle was so astounding that the Evangelist provides the name of the servant: if a reader of his Gospel doubted, he could investigate for himself and verify the facts.1 John …
answered Oct 27 '18 by user33515
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The Greek word is εὐθέως (eutheōs). It is the adverb form of the adjective εὐθύς (eythys), which means "straight" or "direct". εὐθέως seems to always has the meaning of "immediately" or "at once" …
answered Jan 10 '18 by user33515
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I think that the difference, as you suggest with the other Scriptures you cite, is that φιλέω conveys the sense of some demonstrated act of affection. Also, in John 20:2, the verb tense in Greek is a …
answered Mar 28 '17 by user33515
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Scripture - both Old Testament and New - is quite clear that one will be judged according to their works: Psalm 62:12 (KJV) For thou renderest to every man according to his work Job 34:1 …
answered Dec 22 '17 by user33515
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Also Mark 15:33 and Luke 23:44-45. In his commentary on Luke's passage (Sermon CLIII), Cyril of Alexandria (378-444) saw allusions to Amos and to Psalm 69 here: Amos 5:18 (NKJV) Woe to …
answered Feb 19 '18 by user33515
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I don't think it makes sense to read Scripture as a sort of collection of algorithms. Jesus' commandments were a fulfillment of the Old Testament commandments. They were the Old Testament commandmen …
answered Nov 27 '17 by user33515
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Augustine posed almost your identical question in his Harmony of the Gospels: It may also be asked how it is that Mark says: And they went out quickly, and fled from the sepulchre; for they … or completion of the action. We might translate Mark 16:8b as "Neither did they say anything to anyone (at that moment)". 1. Harmony of the Gospels, Book III, Chapter XXIV, No. 64 1. Ibid. …
answered Jun 17 '17 by user33515
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The NIV translation of Isaiah 59:20 may not be exactly accurate. There is a disagreement between the Masoretic Text and the Greek Septuagint here. The Septuagint version of the passage reads: An …
answered Dec 26 '17 by user33515