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Isaiah 6:9-13 to Mark 4:10-12 seem quite similar. One difference is that Mark 4:10-12 does specify (Mark 4:11) "outside" when referring to people who are Not Jesus Christ's followers along with the twelve. However, Isaiah 6:9-13 seems to be focusing on all of the Israelites.

In any case, could someone please provide a deep contextual Comparison & Contrast of Isaiah 6:9-13 to Mark 4:10-12 (esp. in regards to seeing & hearing but Not comprehending)?

Isaiah 6:9-13 (New American Standard Bible 1995)

9 He said, “Go, and tell this people:

‘Keep on listening, but do not perceive;

Keep on looking, but do not understand.’

10 “Render the hearts of this people [a]insensitive,

Their ears [b]dull, And their eyes [c]dim, Otherwise they might see with their eyes, Hear with their ears, Understand with their hearts, And return and be healed.”

11 Then I said, “Lord, how long?” And He answered,

“Until cities are devastated and without inhabitant, Houses are without people

And the land is utterly desolate,

12 “The Lord has removed men far away, And the [d]forsaken places are many in the midst of the land. 13 “Yet there will be a tenth portion in it, And it will again be subject to burning, Like a terebinth or an oak Whose stump remains when it is felled. The holy seed is its stump.”

Mark 4:10-12 New American Standard Bible 1995

10 As soon as He was alone, [a]His followers, along with the twelve, began asking Him about the parables. 11 And He was saying to them, “To you has been given the mystery of the kingdom of God, but those who are outside get everything in parables, 12 so that while seeing, they may see and not perceive, and while hearing, they may hear and not understand, otherwise they might return and be forgiven.”

Isaiah 6:9-13 to Mark 4:10-12 seem quite similar. One difference is that Mark 4:10-12 does specify (Mark 4:11) "outside" when referring to people who are Not Jesus Christ's followers along with the twelve. However, Isaiah 6:9-13 seems to be focusing on all of the Israelites.

In any case, could someone please provide a deep contextual Comparison & Contrast of Isaiah 6:9-13 to Mark 4:10-12 (esp. in regards to seeing & hearing but Not comprehending)?

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It has long been recognized that Mark 4:12 is a paraphrase of Isa 6:9, 10 as per the LXX. Thus it is listed in the UBS5 "Index of Quotations".

Further, Isa 6:9, 10 is also quoted by Luke 8:10, Matt 13:14, 15, Mark 4:12, Acts 28:26, 27 and John 12:40. The reason is simple - it was a very famous and pivotal passage and often referenced (as listed above) in the NT.

Commentators also reference the same thing: Ellicott has this to say (see https://biblehub.com/commentaries/mark/4-12.htm ):

(Mark 4:12) That seeing they may see. . . .—St. Mark characteristically gives the words of Isaiah 6:9, but not as a quotation, and perhaps in a less accurate form, and omits the addition in Matthew, “Blessed are your ears . . .”

In commenting on Isa 6:9, Ellicott observes (see https://biblehub.com/commentaries/isaiah/6-9.htm ):

(9) Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not.—No harder task, it may be, was ever given to man. Ardent dreams of reformation and revival, the nation renewing its strength like the eagle, were scattered to the winds; and he had to face the prospect of a fruitless labour, of feeling that he did but increase the evil against which he strove. It was the very opposite mission of that to which St. Paul was sent, to “open men’s eyes, and turn them from darkness to light” (Acts 26:18). It is significant that the words that followed were quoted both by the Christ (Matthew 13:14-15; Mark 4:12), by St. John (John 12:40), and by St. Paul (Acts 28:26-27), as finding their fulfilment in their own work and the analogous circumstances of their own time. History was repeating itself.

Similarly, Gill says this in commenting on Mark 4:12:

That seeing they may see,.... Which the end and reason of his speaking to them in parables. The passage referred to is in Isaiah 6:9. See Gill on Matthew 13:14. See Gill on Matthew 13:15.

Thus, the link between the two passages of Mark 4:12 and Isa 6:9 is well-known.

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The nation as a whole rejected their messiah Jesus Christ when He came to them. There were a few chosen by grace who believed in Him at the time. This blindness will continue until there's only a stump that remains with the holy seed in its stump.

This blindness is continued all the way through acts 28 where this verse is repeated again in Acts 28:26-27

Israel has not yet entered into the Kingdom, they are still outside of it for now. It was near to them at one time.

This prophecy has had a three fulfillment in Israel: when they rejected Jehovah (Isa. 6:10) when they rejected the Lord (Mt. 13:14-15) and, in this present instance, when they reject the testimony of the spirit through His apostles. Israel, in part has become calloused, until the fullness of the nations may be entering (Ro. 11:25) concordant Commentary

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Isaiah 6:9-10 and Mark 4:12 are parallel but there is difference. The main difference is God did not ask Isaiah talked to the people in parables. So even the Israelites heard Isaiah told them in plain words the command of God, they still did not understand.

Isaiah was called at the time of king Uzziah death (740BC). During the time of king Uzziah, Judah enjoyed a period of success and prosperity that the people moved toward materialism and spiritually deteriorated. When Isaiah was called, he was shocked to say:

5 “Woe to me!” I cried. “I am ruined! For I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips, and my eyes have seen the King, the Lord Almighty.” (Isaiah 6:5 NIV)

The Lord told Isaiah in advance that the people would not listen to him was likely to prepare his mind not to be disappointed to the result of his mission.

In contrary, Jesus paraphrased Isaiah account was in different situation. He was telling parables, not teaching in plain words in the public, only in plain words to his disciples when they were alone. He did not expect his disciples fully understood the parables, but at time the Advocate, the Holy Spirit came, they will fully understand.

33 With many similar parables Jesus spoke the word to them, as much as they could understand.

34 He did not say anything to them without using a parable. But when he was alone with his own disciples, he explained everything. (Mark 4:33-34 NIV)

13 But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you into all the truth. (John 16:13 NIV)

Though they were in two situations, but there is a similarity, that those who can't hear and can't see were same kind of people, who follow their own desire instead of the words of God.

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  • +1 for (Quote) "those who can't hear and can't see were same kind of people, who follow their own desire instead of the words of God" Commented Aug 19, 2023 at 12:46

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