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2 Corinthians 2:12-13 NASB

Now when I came to Troas for the gospel of Christ and when a door was opened for me in the Lord, I had no rest for my spirit, not finding Titus my brother; but taking my leave of them, I went on to Macedonia.

What does the door opening for Paul "in the Lord' mean, and how does that intersect with him finding "no rest for his spirit" due to Titus not being in Troas? Did Christ lead Paul to Troas and also give him unrest in his spirit so that he moved on to Macedonia, or was the unrest in spirit Paul's own feeling apart from the leading of Christ?

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The first time mentioned that Paul was in Troas is in Acts 16:8. It was there when he had a vision from a certain man in Macedonia appealing to him to come help them. He then concluded they God had called him to preach the gospel in Macedonia there so they left Troas. The door was shut at that time as stated in Acts 16:6

After the Holy Spirit had prevented them from speaking the word in the province of Asia, they traveled through the region of Phrygia and Galatia. 7And when they came to the border of Mysia, they tried to enter Bithynia, but the Spirit of Jesus would not permit them.…

The door was then opened for Paul to speak in Troas later on when the door was opened for him to speak as written in Acts 20:6-12.

He is back again in Troas intending to stay for one night. Instead he ends up speaking, discussing, arguing till midnight until a boy falls asleep and falls three floors and was picked up as dead. Paul embraced him and said don't be troubled his life is still in him and the boy was revived. The boy was alive and were greatly comforted.

Paul must've of been expecting Titus to meet him at Troas with news from Corinth. He was concerned to know how they had received his letter that he had written to them previously to right the wrongs that were going on with his beloved Corinthians.

He finally meets up with Titus in Macedonia and is comforted by hearing the good news how they responded to his letter. At times he seemed like he had regretted writing the letter because he did not want to cause them sorrow. He too was anxious to know how they responded to him as well. He could now rejoice and move on.

Corinthians 2:5-9 5For when we arrived in Macedonia, our bodies had no rest, but we were pressed from every direction—conflicts on the outside, fears within. 6But God, who comforts the downcast, comforted us by the arrival of Titus, 7and not only by his arrival, but also by the comfort he had received from you. He told us about your longing, your mourning, and your zeal for me, so that I rejoiced all the more. 8Even if I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it. Although I did regret it, I now see that my letter caused you sorrow, but only for a short time. 9And now I rejoice, not because you were made sorrowful, but because your sorrow led you to repentance.

Ouzo's questions: "What does the door opening for Paul "in the Lord' mean?"

We can see how the Lord spoke to his spirit about not going somewhere and then later on how circumstances opened up later on for him to preach.

"and how does that intersect with him finding "no rest for his spirit" due to Titus not being in Troas? "

It means he did not stay long in Troas even after a door had been open for him to preach because he was anxious to find Titus and hear a report from him.

"Did Christ lead Paul to Troas and also give him unrest in his spirit so that he moved on to Macedonia, or was the unrest in spirit Paul's own feeling apart from the leading of Christ?"

In looking at these passages we see a time where the Lord spoke directly to his spirit and other times He used natural worry that was heavy on his heart to move on to find Titus. He longed hear how the Corinthians had responded to a letter that he felt bad about writing. Titus is the one who could let Paul know what was going on with his beloved Corinthians.

The leading of Christ happens a lot of times in the most natural way. Like Scripture says, we make our plans but the Lord directs our steps.

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