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Gen 1:2 BSB

Now the earth was formless and void, and darkness was over the surface of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the surface of the waters.

Gen 1:10 BSB

God called the dry land “earth,” and the gathering of waters He called “seas.” And God saw that it was good.

Is it the same earth?

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Is the earth the same in both verses?

It depends a lot what you bring into the question as to how you read it.

In Biblical cosmology and frankly all cosmologies until this recently invented secular cosmology the earth was the major part of the universe/cosmo. In today’s cosmology the earth is apparently irrelevantly small due to an ever expanding vacuum that occupies a larger proportion.

But, when you read Genesis you ought to see what the ancients had in mind. The earth and heavens were and are contained in an area much smaller than the distance in secular cosmology claimed between earth and the moon.

So when earth was said to have been made in v2 this same earth covered by waters/(heavens are the waters in v2) in v10. No earth was made in verse 10, earth was ותראה or it was revealed/exposed.

Yes it’s the exact same earth revealed in verse 10 that was made in v1 and mentioned in v2 as being covered by waters.

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In Genesis 1, the word "earth" appears 10 times. They all denote the same earth-concept. It is the concept of a place for human habitation.

Initially, Gen 1:

2a Now the earth was formless and void

Later:

10 God called the dry land “earth,” and the gathering of waters He called “seas.” And God saw that it was good.

In the future, Revelation 21:

1 Then I saw “a new heaven and a new earth,” for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.

The geological features of the earth change. Its purpose does not. It remains the place for human habitation.

Is the Earth in Gen 1:2 the same as the Earth in Gen 1:10?

same concept but different appearances.

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There is a theory, Of course not a popular one, based on the scripture that the second verse of Genesis clearly states that earth was already here (But in a ruined state) In the beginning

The great disruption chronicled in Genesis 1: 2

In the beginning God first created the heaven and the earth.

And the earth was without form, and void; That's how verse two is usually translated.

It's interesting though if you look at the word "was" is hayah which can mean to become. 1961. hayah ► Strong's Concordance hayah: to fall out, come to pass, become, be Original Word: הָיָה

Definition: to fall out, come to pass, become,

So the earth became void and chaotic...

We see that in Isaiah it was originally not created a waste. It was not created so According to Isaiah 45:18

For thus says the LORD who created the heavens, the God who formed the earth and made it, who established it and did not create it a waste, who formed it to be inhabited:

2 Peter3:5 Talks about they being ignorant about the heavens of old and the earth standing out of the water and in the water: Whereby The world that was then was, being overflowed with water perished.

For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water: 2 Peter 3:5

There are those who say this passage is not a reference to Noah's flood.
Compare the heavens and earth which are now to the phrase the heavens were of old. They heavens of Noah's day were the same heavens As an Adams day. Noah's flood had no effect on the upper heavens.

So in regards to your question "Is it the same earth?"

I would venture to say yes, and it is possible that it has been through destruction, and restoration. Of course we know there is a new heaven and new earth coming again.

Genesis is always such a fascinating study with a lot of very different interpretations. This one can be compelling with much more information that is out there in books on this subject.

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