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I’ve read a book on these verses (Luke 1:1-4 that suggested the Greek wording in Luke 1:1-4 shows that “speedy writers” followed Jesus as “ministers of the spoken word” also being eyewitnesses of Christ Himself. My question is, does the Greek make it possible for such an interpretation? This goes along the bounds of the arguments for the “gospel of Q”. Especially knowing that the gospel of Luke was about Jesus:

“Inasmuch as many have taken in hand to set in order a narrative of those things which have been fulfilled among us, just as those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word delivered them to us, it seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write to you an orderly account, most excellent Theophilus, that you may know the certainty of those things in which you were instructed.” ‭‭Luke‬ ‭1:1-4‬

Book: Jesus Stenographers by Ben Van Noort

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  • Do questions like these prove that religious sites act like a magnet for bizarre ideas ?
    – Lucian
    Oct 6 '21 at 15:11
  • It’s not bizarre since it’s based on Scripture. Many people allude to Jesus’ words being mere oral tradition. I think people don’t realize that “ many have taken in hand to set in order a narrative of those things which have been fulfilled among us”. It’s simple.
    – Cork88
    Oct 6 '21 at 15:18
  • Yes, but it is bizarrely (as opposed to logically) based on scripture.
    – Lucian
    Oct 6 '21 at 15:36
  • @ Lucian What is the illogical basis on Scripture?
    – Cork88
    Oct 6 '21 at 15:45
  • You could also ask whether David time travelled, and changed his name to Joseph, so that Jesus could be called son of David. The mere fact that you genuinely don't seem to grasp how bizarre the question even is, is in and of itself extremely odd.
    – Lucian
    Oct 6 '21 at 16:01
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A very interesting question. A search of the Greek text in those passages failed to give any insight into (or support for) this, but that may be my limited understanding.

One thought does come to my mind: Matthew may well fit this description, as a tax-collector, may well be one who made a thorough written record of the work of Jesus. But again, I would think that the eye-witness testimony (following the "two or three witnesses" pattern of the Mosaic law) is the emphasis of Luke

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  • None of what Luke said, even in your Greek search makes any sense for stenography? “many have taken in hand to set in order a narrative of those things which have been fulfilled among us”(Luke 1:4). Do you think that the “many” is merely Matthew, Mark, John? How else were Jesus’ words written down? Hearsay? Telephone game? That’s what critics would imply. I think the case with Luke 1:1-4 is now at least obvious to me. ;)
    – Cork88
    Oct 6 '21 at 15:26
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    Thanks for the reply - I have a better sense of your point. First, I would suggest that "many" could easily refer to the other accounts; in ancient times accounts of events usually numbered one or two; three would be in contrast "many". Again, the Mosaic need for witnesses is the basis of this idea; two is sufficient, three is many. But I would suggest that the issue of writing down Jesus word's being the only way they were accurately passed on misses the point of John 14:26. Does that make sense?
    – Brainardo
    Oct 6 '21 at 16:06
  • Can you elaborate or put into other words what you meant by: “But I would suggest that the issue of writing down Jesus word's being the only way they were accurately passed on misses the point of John 14:26.“
    – Cork88
    Oct 6 '21 at 17:05
  • Thank you for asking for clarification. In John 14:26 Jesus states that the Holy Spirit would come to the Apostles and provide to them a recollection of the things that Jesus said to them. This would seem to be the most likely answer to the question "How else were Jesus’ words written down"? These Apostles themselves declared that it was the Holy Spirit who provided them the things to write (2 Peter 1:18-19). If there is a supernatural recollection of words available, there is no need for sternography to explain how the words of Jesus were recorded.
    – Brainardo
    Oct 6 '21 at 20:43
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    @ Brainardo I’ll reflect on what you said. I’ve heard of the 2-3 witness mosaic thing before, just not sure if it was used in relation to O.P. I can leave it at that, I can study more. If you have any book recommendations on the Gospels, I’m down to look at them! ;)
    – Cork88
    Oct 6 '21 at 23:43
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Does Luke 1:1-4 prove that stenographers followed Jesus to record His words?

No, at least not 100% proof because there are explanations other than stenographers.

Does the Greek make it possible for such an interpretation?

This is a better question. Still, I think the possibility/probability is low.

If there were stenographers around, I'd expect the details of recordings would be more uniform. E.g., what day of the week did the last supper take place? This was an important event; yet, we do not know exactly what the answer is. There are plenty of these kinds of non-uniform recordings found in the gospels.

On the other hand, the emphasis was on everyday eyewitnesses who could not write, Luk 23:

48 When all the people who had gathered to witness this sight saw what took place, they beat their breasts and went away.

OP: Luke 23:48 as you quoted, they did indeed “saw”, but who recorded that? It’s likely Luke took from the many narratives of what had been accomplished already, from the other eyewitnesses.

True, Luke could have access to early drafts of Mark and Matthew.

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  • That’s a reasonable reply, but Luke 23:48 as you quoted, they did indeed “saw”, but who recorded that? It’s likely Luke took from the many narratives of what had been accomplished already, from the other eyewitnesses. Unless we assume John 14:26 is the only means of how Jesus’ words were recorded, which I doubt is the main method. In John 7:53-8:11, when Jesus draws in the sand; it’s likely that - that is an eyewitness account. Hence why Luke drew upon those who wrote before him. (Could I be wrong? Certainly)
    – Cork88
    Oct 6 '21 at 15:22
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    Good questions. I added :)
    – Tony Chan
    Oct 6 '21 at 15:49

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