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In 2 Kings 4 we have the account of the Shunammite woman and her son. The child dies at noon after complaining of a headache of some description. Many commentators say this was dehydration or sunstroke.

Pulpit Commentary Verse 20. - And when he had taken him, and brought him to his mother, he sat on her knees till noon. It was in the morning, therefore, that the child received his sunstroke - an unusual, but not an unknown, occurrence. In the East the sun often becomes intensely hot by ten o'clock. And then died. There is no ambiguity here, no room for doubt; the child not only became insensible, but died. The historian could not possibly have expressed himself more plainly. 2 Kings 4:20

I disagree with these assertions as according to Israels temperature in the Galilee during harvest time (mar-apr) it would have been 70-79F or 21-26C no where near hot enough to induce such an event.

Best Time to Visit Israel | Climate Guide | Audley Travel https://www.audleytravel.com › ... › Israel vacations Destination Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Galilee 63°F 4" 66°F 3" 70°F 2" 79°F 1" 86°F 0" 91°F 0" 95°F 0" 95°F 0" 91°F 0"

I personally think is more likely to be a brain aneurysm or stroke or similar

When Elisha comes to the child he preforms an unusual sort of CPR, after the second time of which the child sneezes 7 times and wakes up.

  • Is there a significance in sneezing 7 times? (considering other occurrences of such are significant eg: 7 days of creation etc)
  • Is there any sort of head problem resulting in death that after CPR is preformed results in sneezing?
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The phrase "As the Lord lives" occurs seven times in 1 Kings and seven times in 2 Kings. Seven is the number of divine completion.

2 Kings 5:14

So he went down and dipped himself in the Jordan seven times, as the man of God had told him, and his flesh was restored and became clean like that of a young boy.

Seven is a signature of a divine act of God.

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    Up-voted +1, but some say that seven is the number of perfection, ten being the number (a full and complete decimal number) of completeness.
    – Nigel J
    Jun 29 at 17:41

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