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How does Jesus, in John 6, answer this question: “If someone has come, for life, to Jesus the Bread of life, (a) did he come as a result of the Father giving him to Jesus, or (b) did the Father give him to Jesus as a result of his coming to him?” ?

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John 6:

37a All those the Father gives me will come to me

Let P1 be a person.

If the Father gives P1 to Jesus, P1 will come to Jesus.

Did he [P1] come as a result of the Father giving him to Jesus?

Yes.

37b whoever comes to me I will never drive away.

If P1 comes to me, then Jesus will not drive P1 away.

Assume that 37a and 37b are independent sentences. Each is complete in itself.

Did the Father give him [P1] to Jesus as a result of his [P1] coming to him [Jesus]?

If you assume 37a and 37b are independent, then no.

As John Rowse pointed out in his comment, the two clauses have different subjects and different actions. A case for their independence can be made.

Now assume that 37a and 37b are dependent since the two clauses are joined by the word "and".

John 6:37

All those the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never drive away.

If the Father gives P1 to Jesus, P1 will come to Jesus.

AND (the first-order logical AND operator)

If P1 comes to me, then Jesus will not drive P1 away.

Did the Father give him [P1] to Jesus as a result of his [P1] coming to him [Jesus]?

Now the two if-statements are declared true by AND.

If you assume 37a and 37b are dependent, then yes.

However still, strictly speaking, there is no formal causation relationship between the two. There is only an association (pair) relationship.

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  • Thankyou for your answer, but could you please explain the second half? What do you mean by 37a and 37b being dependent/independent?
    – John Rowse
    May 7 at 20:16
  • Good question. I added. Ask again if further questions.
    – Tony Chan
    May 7 at 20:58
  • Granted that in 37b, the action of the Son as Recipient and faithful Steward of the gifts is not independent of his relationship to the Father as Giver of the gifts in 37a, and the Father’s purpose in giving them to him, nevertheless, the two have different roles, which should not be confused. The “and” in v37 links statements with different subjects and different actions. 37a ascribes to the Father the initiating action of giving to the Son a group who all come, and 37b–40 states what, in obedience to his Father’s will, the Son does with his gifts now that they have come.
    – John Rowse
    May 9 at 21:20
  • Good point. I added.
    – Tony Chan
    May 10 at 13:58

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