3

Romans 1:5 "through whom we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith for the sake of his name among all the nations". ESV

In Rom 1:5 grace brings about, comes before, the obedience of faith. "Obedience" as faith/pisteuete is commanded as in Mark 1:15.

Romans 5:2 "Through him we have obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God". ESV

In Romans 5:2 faith comes before grace. Faith being the means of access to grace.

2
  • And of his fulness have all we received, and grace against grace. John 1:16. (και χαριν αντι χαριτος). and grace over-against grace [YLT] . . . . . .(Up-voted +1.) – Nigel J Apr 30 at 15:38
  • It is in the order of Romans Ch 1 because of the timeline of sin. God had to first make freely available salvation by grace. Faith is merely the human acceptance of the gift. It is simple logical order. Someone choosing to take something that is not freely offered or purchased is engaging in an act of sin (stealing or theft). Jesus paid the price so that the free gift of grace may be offered to us such that it is not in breach of the commandment "thou shalft not steal". – Adam Apr 30 at 20:41
2

Grace is something that we do not deserve. It is personified by Jesus.

John 1:17

For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.

The Father sent his son Jesus so that we may be saved through him. We don't deserve it but God extended Grace anyway.

Eph. 2:8

For by grace you have been saved through faith; and this is not your own doing, it is the gift of God.

Here the word order is 'grace' then 'faith'. This is natural and logical. Faith needs an object of faith. Christ is the object. We have faith in Christ.

Romans 3:24

and all are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.

Romans 5:2

Through him we have obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

Why then in Romans 5:2, the word order is 'faith' then 'grace'?

Actually, the word order is 'faith' then 'this grace'. This grace refers to Christ. In other words, we have obtained access to the Father by faith into Christ's redemption, i.e., by faith, we believe into Christ's dying for us.

Why is grace mentioned before faith in Romans 1:5?

That's natural and logical.

but faith before grace in Romans 5:2?

Romans 5:2 reads "faith into this grace", i.e., "faith into Christ's redemption" where "this grace" is the object of "faith". The key to sorting this out is the preposition "into" which does not indicate that faith comes before grace.

1
  • I like the last sentence, some good old fashioned English theory..."The key to sorting this out is the preposition "into" which does not indicate that faith comes before grace" + from me – Adam Apr 30 at 20:46
1

Let us be very clear about this - Faith is not a work we perform in order to earn grace!! (If it were, grace would not be grace!)

"Faith" is an awkward translation to modern ears - "trust" or "faithfulness" would mostly be a better translation. That is, God extends grace that we must accept by trusting Him - there is nothing we can do to earn it.

Rom 3:22-24 - This righteousness is given through the faithfulness of Jesus Christ to all who believe. There is no difference between Jew and Gentile, for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and all are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.

Rom 1:5 tells us a very precious thing - trust in God brings about faithfulness and obedience to God.

The other side of the same coin is expressed in Rom 5:2 - we understand and accept God's initiative of grace via trusting in God's promise.

Salvation is God's initiative, Phil 2:13, John 6:44, Rom 2:4, 5:5, Eph 2:5, Is 65:1. We accept that initiative of grace by faith that brings about our faithfulness and obedience to God.

1
  • Right, grace means gift and faith is how we accept that gift. – Perry Webb Apr 30 at 23:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.