2

Drawn from answers to several other questions

Part One

In Romans 10:9 we are told:

If you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.

The phrase "you will be saved" comes from the Greek σωθήσῃ; a form of the verb σῴζω (sózó). Several usages of σῴζω include:

  • To Save
  • To Heal
  • To Preserve
  • To Rescue

(see here)

Which of these meanings is meant, and how do we know that in context?


Part Two

If we conclude that "saved" is to be preferred over other meanings of σῴζω because the following verse speaks of σωτηρίαν ("salvation"), fair, but I'm asking something a step further than that:

  1. What do "saved" & "salvation" mean here?
  2. If we are being saved (or healed, preserved, rescued); what are we being saved, healed, preserved, or rescued from?
1

BDAG give two basic meanings for the verb σῴζω which are only the same meaning in different situations:

  1. to preserve or rescue from natural dangers and afflictions, save, keep from harm, rescue. Within this meaning, BDAG goes on to provide several sub-meanings/examples:

. (a) save from death, eg, Matt 14:30, 27:40, etc.

. (b) bring out safely, eg, Jude 5, Heb 5:7, etc

. (c) save/free from disease [this form is often translated "heal"], eg, Matt 9:22, Mark 5:34, etc.

. (d) keep, preserve

  1. to save or preserve from transcendental danger or destruction, save/preserve from eternal death, eg, 1 Cor 1:21, 2 Tim 1:9, etc.

BDAG also notes that some passages belong under both meanings such as Mark 8:35, Luke 9:24.

Rom 10:9

Note that in Rom 10:9, the verb form is σωθήσῃ which is passive (and future). As such, BDAG defines this under meaning #2 above, ie, to be saved or attain salvation.

Word meanings

Consider the following scenario where a drowning person is about to lose hope when they see a rescue boat approaching. The crew then attaches a life-vest and begins dragging the person towards the shore line. The person being rescued might then say:

  • when they see the boat approaching, "I am saved"
  • when the life vest is being attached, "I am being saved"
  • when being towed toward the shore, "I will be saved".

Thus, Rom 10:9 is a simple statement of the following facts:

(A) The passive voice says that the person did not save themselves but salvation/rescue from eternal death was provided from outside the person, namely Jesus

(B) The future tense means that at the resurrection, the person will be raised to be with Jesus rather than condemned as an eternal, unforgiven sinner.

0

Let's see the context:

Roman 10:9 If you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. 10 For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved. 11As Scripture says, “Anyone who believes in him will never be put to shame.” 12For there is no difference between Jew and Gentile—the same Lord is Lord of all and richly blesses all who call on him, 13for, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.”

The passage emphasizes believing, faith, and justification as necessary conditions for being saved or eternal salvation.

Anyone who believes in him will never be put to shame.

This sentence cannot be interpreted temporally/horizontally. Even Jesus suffered shame on the cross. The whole passage is about eternal/verticle salvation. It is not just about healing us from sickness.

If we are being saved (or healed, preserved, rescued); what are we being saved, healed, preserved, or rescued from?

Ultimately, we are being saved from the wrath of God.

Romans 5:9

Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God's wrath through him!

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