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In Hebrew (and most modern translations), Job 22:21 reads:

הַסְכֶּן־נָא עִמּוֹ וּשְׁלם בָּהֶם תְּֽבוֹאַתְךָ טוֹבָֽה׃
Agree with God, and be at peace; thereby good will come to you. (ESV)

The Vulgate says:

adquiesce igitur ei et habeto pacem et per haec habebis fructus optimos

which more or less matches the Hebrew. And then there's the Greek. In the Septuagint, it says this:

γενοῦ δὴ σκληρός ἐὰν ὑπομείνῃς εἶτ᾽ ὁ καρπός σου ἔσται ἐν ἀγαθοῗς
Be firm, I pray thee, if thou canst endure; then thy fruit shall prosper. (Brenton)

I don't see any relationship between the Greek and the other languages for the first phrase in this verse. What's going on here?

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  • There are lots of textual variants of the bible. Different manuscripts differ in literally thousands of ways. Most likely there are different versions of the Hebrew text that explain the differences you're seeing.
    – user39728
    Mar 28 at 23:22
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lxx/job/

In many places Job is difficult to translate because of its many unusual words and its style. For that reason, modern translations frequently differ widely. Even the pre-Christian translator(s) of Job into Greek (the Septuagint) seems often to have been perplexed. The Septuagint of Job is about 400 lines shorter than the accepted Hebrew text, and it may be that the translator(s) simply omitted lines he (they) did not understand. The early Syriac (Peshitta), Aramaic (Targum) and Latin (Vulgate) translators had similar difficulties.

Job 22:21 wasn't the only verse that the archaic LXX translators had trouble with. Job was an ancient book even to the LXX people.

Even though the wordings of Job 22:21 in LXX and MT are very different, the general directions are the same. In both versions, Eliphaz appeals to Job to endure the present hardship and follow God firmly, then he will see a good future that God would provide for him.

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