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Revelation 5:13-14 ESV:

13 And I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth and in the sea, and all that is in them, saying,

To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor and glory and might forever and ever!”

14 And the four living creatures said, “Amen!” and the elders fell down and worshiped.

Who is being worshipped? Him who sits on the throne? The Lamb? Both?

Context that motivated the question: link.

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  • Is really a question as to who? – Revelation Lad Mar 22 at 17:28
  • You might also include "the four living creatures" as another possibility for who the elders are worshiping. But Revelation 4:10 states the answer clearly. – 4castle Mar 22 at 17:45
  • @RevelationLad - yes. If you find the question strange, see the link provided as context to understand why I'm asking. – Spirit Realm Investigator Mar 22 at 18:10
  • @4castle The four living creatures are not included in the statement (which you missed out at the end of verse 14) 'him that liveth for ever and ever'. – Nigel J Mar 22 at 19:38
  • @NigelJ That ending appears to be an addition that is found in the Textus Receptus, but I agree with that interpretation because it still agrees with Rev 4:10. – 4castle Mar 22 at 19:52
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The throne and the Lamb are paired together in 4 places in Revelation.

Revelation 5:6 And between the throne and the four living creatures and among the elders I saw a Lamb standing, as though it had been slain, with seven horns and with seven eyes, which are the seven spirits of God sent out into all the earth.

Revelation 5:13 And I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth and in the sea, and all that is in them, saying, “To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor and glory and might forever and ever!”

Revelation 6:16 calling to the mountains and rocks, “Fall on us and hide us from the face of him who is seated on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb,

Revelation 7:9 After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, 10and crying out with a loud voice, “Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!” 11And all the angels were standing around the throne and around the elders and the four living creatures, and they fell on their faces before the throne and worshiped God

In the last passage, John made it clear that God is sitting on the throne and the Lamb is paired to Him as one and the same God that is being worshiped.

As pointed out by Dottard's comments, there are actually 3 more passages that the throne and the Lamb are paired. The total number of passages is 7.

Revelation 14:3 And they sang a new song before the throne and before the four living creatures and the elders. No one could learn the song except the 144,000 who had been redeemed from the earth. 4These are those who did not defile themselves with women, for they remained virgins. They follow the Lamb wherever he goes. They were purchased from among mankind and offered as firstfruits to God and the Lamb.

Revelation 22:1 Then the angel showed me the river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb

Revelation 22:3 No longer will there be any curse. The throne of God and of the Lamb will be in the city, and his servants will serve him. 4 They will see his face, and his name will be on their foreheads.

Again, Dottard insightfully saw that in the last passage, the singular "his" is used for God's/Lamb's servants, face, and name. To me, this is quite solid in proving that God and the Lamb are one and the same in the context of Revelation.

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  • And what exactly is your conclusion? – Revelation Lad Mar 22 at 18:26
  • The Lamb is God. – Tony Chan Mar 22 at 18:39
  • You should make that clear. To me "the same God" in your answer simply repeats the potential ambiguity present in the initial statement. – Revelation Lad Mar 22 at 18:46
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    Yes. I agree. 'The Lamb' is manifest. 'God sits' can only be true in manifestation. Thus God sits (I and the Father are One) and God sits as the Lamb, also. There is a deliberate double meaning. (Note : not an 'ambiguity' - there are two distinct meanings.) Upvoted +1./ – Nigel J Mar 22 at 19:46
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    "To me, this is quite solid in proving that God and the Lamb are one and the same in the context of Revelation." One ambiguous line is 'quite solid' in proving the God and the Lamb are the same thing - despite statement after statement throughout Revelation distinguishing the two! Seems more straightforward to think the word 'his' here refers to God, as that is what is explicitly mentioned after this line. – One God the Father Mar 22 at 23:32
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The Biblical Unitarian view is that both God and the Lamb are to be worshipped, where the Lamb = Jesus Christ. The natural reading of Revelation 5:14 as far as I can tell is that both are being worshipped, and this is not problematic for a Biblical Unitarian view.

Jesus is not God in the book of Revelation. They are distinguished repeatedly in Revelation, including Revelation 1:1, 1:5-6, 3:2, 3:12, 5:13, 6:16, 7:9, 7:10, and so on.

"The Book of Revelation is “the revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him” (1:1). From the very first verse we are told that Jesus is not God." (In the Book of Revelation, God is not the Lamb, and the Lamb is not God)

As for Revelation 5 in particular,

"The God of chapter 4 is worshiped because He is God who created everything. The Lamb of chapter 5 is worshipped not because he is God, but because he was slain and by his blood did ransom men for God (5:10)." (ibid.)

In Biblical Unitarian thought, both Jesus and God can be worshipped, although God is the ultimate object of worship.

IMO it is a poor hermeneutic to cherry-pick a few verses in Revelation (or elsewhere) that might suggest the Lamb = God (in this case, a background belief that only God can be worshipped might lead to that conclusion here, although this background belief is mistaken - Jesus is clearly worshipped as King, see the Magi in Matthew 2:2) when the overwhelming majority of evidence in Revelation suggests the Lamb and God are distinct.

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  • So in this point you guys differ from JWs. They cannot accept the possibility of worshipping the Son. – Spirit Realm Investigator Mar 22 at 20:39
  • Now I am confused - you mentioned "unitarian" which says that there is only one God, namely, the Father. yet you suggest that both God and the Lamb are to be worshiped? – Dottard Mar 22 at 20:41
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    @Dottard Yes. Deserved 'worship' does not require that someone be God from a Biblical Unitarian perspective - Jesus being the relevant case. Unitarian doesn't mean there is only one God (i.e., monotheism - but you know that, I assume you just mis-typed), unitarians don't believe God is composed of multiple 'persons' (whatever that means exactly) such that Jesus is also God and various references to 'God' in the Bible are actually shorthand for 'God the Father'. – One God the Father Mar 22 at 20:51

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