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John 15:19 ESV "If you were of the world, the world would love you as its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you".

There is on this site a question that looks at "world", here I want to look at "out":

A. "from" out of the world. [He chose a piece of fruit "from" a selection in a bowl].

"I have chosen you from the world", Aramaic Bible in P.E. We also find "from" in GWT and Coverdale.

B. I chose you "to" be out of this world. [He chose some fruit "to" sell, eat, give].

"I chose you to come out of the world", New Living Translation.

"I have chosen you to leave the world", CEV.

Does "ek" have a different meaning here than in the two previous places it occurs in this verse and if so why?

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  • KJV and YLT both have 'out of the world'. – Nigel J Feb 26 at 13:57
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English Standard Version

If you were of the world [ἐκ τοῦ κόσμου], the world would love you as its own; but because you are not of the world [ἐκ τοῦ κόσμου], but I chose you out of the world [ἐκ τοῦ κόσμου], therefore the world hates you.

In one verse, the phrase "of the world" [ἐκ τοῦ κόσμου] is used three times.

Why in the 3rd time, it is translated as "out of the world"?

In the first 2 times, the phrase is associated with the verb to be. In the 3rd time, it is associated with the verb to choose.

have chosen
ἐξελεξάμην (exelexamēn)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Middle - 1st Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1586: To pick out for myself, choose, elect, select. Middle voice from ek and lego; to select.

The lexeme for this Greek word is eklegó.
ek (g1537) means from or out of.

ἀλλ’ ἐγὼ **ἐξ**ελεξάμην ὑμᾶς   **ἐκ** τοῦ κόσμου
but I chose you                **out of** the world

Why in the 3rd time, it is translated as "out of the world"? Where does the sense of "out" come from?

It comes from the verb to choose, to pick out, ek-lego.

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  • Great assessment of the grammar tying the interpretation of the preposition to the verb (+1). Prepositions are tricky to translate; they are so idiomatic that a good translation must consider the verb associated with the preposition. – Hold To The Rod Feb 26 at 17:11
  • Exactly. Good point. – Tony Chan Feb 26 at 17:19

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