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We read at Matt 7 : 26-27 (NRSVCE) :

And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not act on them will be like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell—and great was its fall!

One sees that the allegory would have been complete even without the phrase "and great was its fall". That the Lord did use the phrase, indicates that it was not a causal expression. May be he was prophesying the ready-to-happen fall of Jerusalem . Or, may be he was doing a flash-back of the fall of Adam and Eve. So what did Jesus intend by saying "and great was its fall" at Matt 7: 27?

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Matthew 7:24-27 refers to the parables of the wise and foolish builders in Proverbs 14:1-14:11.

Proverbs 9:1-Proverbs 14:1 explains the "house upon the rock" is built with Wisdom = Chakmah ( חָ֖כְמָה ) for "Fear of YHVH" = Yiret YHVH ( יִרְאַ֣ת יְ֖הוָה ) by focusing on righteous obedience to יהוה through honesty, diligent learning, discipline & charitable works.

Proverbs 14:1 [MT] "The wisest of women builds her house, But folly tears it down with its own hands." ( חַכְמ֣וֹת נָ֭שִׁים בָּנְתָ֣ה בֵיתָ֑הּ וְ֝אִוֶּ֗לֶת בְּיָדֶ֥יהָ תֶהֶרְסֶֽנּוּ )

Proverbs 14:11 [MT] explains the "house of the wicked" ( בֵּ֣ית רְ֭שָׁעִים ) made by foolish builders who despise יהוה and will get destroyed : " The house of the wicked will be demolished, But the tent of the upright will flourish. " ( בֵּ֣ית רְ֭שָׁעִים יִשָּׁמֵ֑ד וְאֹ֖הֶל יְשָׁרִ֣ים יַפְרִֽיחַ )

Proverbs 14:11 is what Yeshua of Nazareth is referencing in Matthew 7:27, when he is quoted by Greeks:

"and" = kai ( καὶ ), "[great]" = megalē ( μεγάλη ), "was" = ēn ( ἦν ), "The" = hē ( ἡ ), "Fall" = ptōsis ( πτῶσις ), "of it" = ** autēs ( αὐτῆς )**.

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    Thanks for this. Very useful (+1)
    – Dave
    Feb 5 at 17:14
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Matthew 7:24 “Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. 25The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. 26But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. 27The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.”

It is a special effect of imagery. From the cinematography point of view, the story and the chapter ends with a big BANG!

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

and it fell: and great was the fall of it—terrible the ruin! How lively must this imagery have been to an audience accustomed to the fierceness of an Eastern tempest, and the suddenness and completeness with which it sweeps everything unsteady before it!

The Lord did use the phrase, indicates that it was not a causal expression.

Right. Further, it was an exceptional ending.

Bengel's Gnomen

We see, from the present example, that it is not necessary for all sermons to end in a consolatory strain.

In case, people miss the importance of this. Vincent's Word Studies explicitly point to Bengel

Great was the fall of it The conclusion of the Sermon on the Mount. "Thus," remarks Bengel, "it is not necessary for every sermon to end with consolation."

The crash serves as a contrast to the stability of the house built on the solid foundation.

May be he was prophesying the ready-to-happen fall of Jerusalem.

Not in Matthew 7. Jesus did not say that Jerusalem was built on sand, physically or figuratively. In fact, he plainly prophesies the fall of Jerusalem in Matthew 24:1-2.

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