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NIV Hebrews 11:24 By faith Moses, when he was grown, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. 25He chose to suffer oppression with God’s people rather than to experience the fleeting enjoyment of sin. 26He valued disgrace for Christ above the treasures of Egypt, for he was looking ahead to his reward.

Moses chose to suffer oppression with God’s people and left Egypt before he wrote the Pentateuch. What is the disgrace for Christ in connection with Moses who was born 1500 years earlier?

  • Curious? Which translation are you using? Interesting that it chose both ‘disgrace’ and ‘christ’. – Dave Oct 29 at 18:26
  • NIV : 24 By faith Moses, when he had grown up, refused to be known as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. 25 He chose to be mistreated along with the people of God rather than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin. 26 He regarded disgrace for the sake of Christ as of greater value than the treasures of Egypt, because he was looking ahead to his reward. – חִידָה Oct 29 at 18:43
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Moses refused to become one people with the Egyptians because they worshipped idols, not the Lord.

ESV Hebrews 11:26

He considered the reproach of Christ greater wealth than the treasures of Egypt, for he was looking to the reward.

What is the reproach of Christ?

Adam Clarke Commentary

The reproach of Christ - the reproach which God's people had, in consequence of their decided opposition to idolatry, may be termed the reproach of Christ, for they refused to become one people with the Egyptians, ... Many have been stumbled by the word ὁ Χριστος, Christ, here; because they cannot see how Moses should have any knowledge of him. It may be said that it was just as easy for God Almighty to reveal Christ to Moses, as it was for him to reveal him to Isaiah, or to the shepherds, or to John Baptist; or to manifest him in the flesh. After all there is much reason to believe that, by του Χριστου, here, of Christ or the anointed, the apostle means the whole body of the Israelitish or Hebrew people; for, as the word signifies the anointed, and anointing was a consecration to God, to serve him in some particular office, as prophet, priest, king, or the like, all the Hebrew people were considered thus anointed or consecrated; and it is worthy of remark that Χριστος is used in this very sense by the Septuagint, 1 Samuel 2:35; Psalm 105:15; and Habakkuk 3:13; where the word is necessarily restrained to this meaning.

Even though Moses was born so much earlier, Adam Clarke interpreted that the reproach of Christ was the reproach of the Hebrew people enslaved in Egypt. Moses took on that reproach by returning to Egypt to join his people. Compared with the Egyptians, the Hebrews were the chosen anointed.

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The context of, 'Moses regarding disgrace FOR Christ' or, 'considering the reproach of Christ greater' is a matter of faith as the whole chapter points out.

He knew well the promise of the Messiah to come, the one who would save - not just the nation of Israel as he was being led to do, but the entire creation.

The LORD your God will raise up to you a Prophet from the middle of you, of your brothers, like to me; to him you shall listen Deut 18:15

And I suspect that the unfortunate incident of 'striking the rock' instead of talking to it (as instructed) to release 'living water', Moses gathered what the typology represented. Of course, the typology was thick on the ground and he would be tripping over it constantly during his life!

Then Moses lifted up his hand and struck the rock twice with his rod; and water came forth abundantly Num 20:11

He knew well the strife they were in was because God had some lessons to teach His people and while it was difficult, extremely wearying and stressful, he happily endured this for the sake of the bigger picture - of which he was a small player.

Also glad to do this, (as viewed from an Egyptian perspective, a disgrace to now live as he was) than rest and relax in Egypt as a prince wanting for nothing. Better to work for God and suffer in it, than work for man and live on pleasure with no hope for a future.

v39 And all these (men and women of faith), having gained approval through their faith, did not receive what was promised, 40because God had provided something better for us, so that apart from us they would not be made perfect.

Time of ~1500 years has nothing to do with anything. Moses knew God's faithfulness and righteousness and trusted that whatever God said He would do would be done. All these mentioned in Heb 11 lived on a promise from God - for themselves, their nation and their future. Glimpsing only in part what glory lay ahead for the faithful servant. In Moses' case, the riches would be far greater than Egypt's and he reckoned it was worth the temporary suffering/disgrace !

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The "Disgrace for Christ" in [Hebrews 11:24-26] is a Midrashic statement referencing "the sin of The Anointed Priest" / Ha-Kohen Ha-Meshiach ( הַכֹּהֵ֧ן הַמָּשִׁ֛יחַ ) from [Leviticus 4:3, 4:5, 4:16].


Hebrews 11:24-26 [NIV]

"[24]By faith Moses, when he had grown up, refused to be known as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter [25]He chose to be mistreated along with the people of God rather than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin. [26] He regarded disgrace for the sake of Christ as of greater value than the treasures of Egypt, because he was looking ahead to his reward."


Moshe ( משֶׁה֙ ) valued witnessing the restoration of God's Anointed Priest (Leviticus 4:16, Hebrews 11:26) more than existing as an egyptian prince / son of Pharaoh's daughter [Bat-Pareoh, בַּת־פַּרְעֹה֙] (Exodus 2:10-15, Hebrews 11:24), because after the disgrace of Ha-Meshiach was resolved Moshe could celebrate the chance of atonement for Yisrael's sins.

  • Moshe would rather witness the Anointed Kohen's repentance to his God YHVH living in accordance to God's commandments instead of submitting himself to an unholy life with Egyptians who did not acknowledge YHVH.

Regarding the "Disgrace for Christ" or Sin of the Anointed Priest ( הַכֹּהֵ֧ן הַמָּשִׁ֛יחַ יֶֽחֱטָ֖א )

Leviticus / Vayikra (וַיִּקְרָ֖א) Chapter 4: verse 3 [MT] :

"If The-Kohen The-Meshiach sins, bringing guilt to the people, then he shall bring for his sin which he has committed, an unblemished young bull as a sin offering to YHVH." (אִ֣ם הַכֹּהֵ֧ן הַמָּשִׁ֛יחַ יֶֽחֱטָ֖א לְאַשְׁמַ֣ת הָעָ֑ם וְהִקְרִ֡יב עַ֣ל חַטָּאתוֹ֩ אֲשֶׁ֨ר חָטָ֜א פַּ֣ר בֶּן־בָּקָ֥ר תָּמִ֛ים לַֽיהֹוָ֖ה לְחַטָּֽאת)

Leviticus 4:16 " The-Priest The-Messiah shall bring some blood of The-Bull into the Tent of Meeting " (וְהֵבִ֛יא הַכֹּהֵ֥ן הַמָּשִׁ֖יחַ מִדַּ֣ם הַפָּ֑ר אֶל־אֹ֖הֶל מוֹעֵֽד )

Once the Christ / the Anointed / the Messiah / Ha-Meshiach (הַמָּשִׁ֖יחַ) atoned for his own sin, the sins of God's people could then be atoned for by the Anointed Kohen.

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